An Eye for Art: Hanka Wolterstorff – ‘Llama’

September 10, 2014 at 10:41 am (An Eye for Art) (, , , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed an informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week he talks about ‘Llama’, ceramics, 26 cm wide x 33 cm high x 25 cm deep, 2014, from Hanka Wolterstorff.

 

Hanka Wolterstorff, 'Llama', ceramics, 26wx33hx25d cm, 2014 - USD 200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, ‘Llama’, ceramics, 26wx33hx25d cm, 2014 – USD 200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

The European Ceramic Work Centre (also on Facebook) in ‘s Hertogenbosch exists for almost 25 years. Great artists such as Anish Kapoor, Tony Cragg, but also Dutch artists  such as Karin Arink (also on Facebook) and Thom Puckey had the opportunity to make ceramic art works there. Every year there are many artists who are ‘fighting’ for a place to work at the EKWC. It is a popular institute.

When Hanka Wolterstorff (Hoorn, 1943) started her career in ceramics, so much appreciation for ceramics was yet unheard of. Ceramics have had to live with the ‘vase trauma’ for a long time. Most people associated ceramics with vases, with decorative objects or with utilitarian objects. Art it could not be, let alone good art.

With her work Wolterstorff proves the absurdity of that idea. Her sculptures are abstract. They don’t want to portray anything, they don’t want to be useful, but they want to express something. Like movement for example. In this object she manages to create the suggestion of upward motion. As though the different segments are stretching themselves up. Because she uses lively colors, that sense of mobility is enhanced.

The colors are also there to reach a layeredness. They lie on top of and against each other. They run into and over one another. They also serve to seduce the viewer. You can hardly resist touching it.

Because it is ‘just’ made up of colorful, motile shapes, it is possible to imagine just about anything. Is the work a representation of nature, of the wind, of  rippling water, of plants that move in the wind or are budding? Or does it refer to cultural practices?

What is special, is that she succeeds in creating an illusion of weightlessness in her sculptures, while of course they are anything but.

Ceramics are a very old medium. It is also a medium that was used, and is used, all over the world. After all, the base material – clay – is easy to find almost everywhere. That is perhaps one of the reasons why for so long it was not considered ‘real’ art.

This work shows how striking it can be.

 

TEXT Rob Perrée, Paris, August 2014

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Want to see this and other work of Hanka Wolterstorff ‘up close and personal’? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Hanka Wolterstorff please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/hankawolterstorff.

Print

More work by Hanka Wolterstorff available in Readytex Art Gallery:

 

Hanka Wolterstorff, 'De golfslag van Coronie', ceramics, 60wx38hx32d cm, 2011 - USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, ‘De golfslag van Coronie’, ceramics, 60wx38hx32d cm, 2011 – USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, 'Speelbal van de natuur', ceramics, 40wx35hx30d cm, 2011 - USD 250 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, ‘Speelbal van de natuur’, ceramics, 40wx35hx30d cm, 2011 – USD 250 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, 'Vaas', ceramics, 28wx31hx18d cm, 2014 - USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, ‘Vaas’, ceramics, 28wx31hx18d cm,
2014 – USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, 'Untiltled I', ceramics, 2007 - USD 125 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, ‘Untiltled I’, ceramics, 2007 – USD 125 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

LOGO eye for art

The 19th edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on September10, 2014 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on September 10, 2014.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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An Eye for Art: John Lie A Fo – ‘Le Serpent bleu’

August 26, 2014 at 11:56 pm (An Eye for Art) (, , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed an informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week he talks about ‘Le Serpent Bleu’, screenprint (6/60), 70 cm wide x 49 cm high, 1990, from John Lie A Fo.

John Lie A Fo, ‘Le Serpent Bleu’, screenprint (6/60), 70x49cm, 2010 - USD 400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

John Lie A Fo, ‘Le Serpent Bleu’, screenprint (6/60), 70x49cm, 1990 – USD 400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

How much anger can you put into a relatively small screen print? John Lie A Fo (Paramaribo, 1945) has done a pretty good job of it. If looks could kill … If body language could swear … The work resembles a variation on the Adam-and-Eve story. Yet here the serpent has already put his diabolical seduction skills into practice. The woman confronts the man with this. A painful moment. Of course the story is more universal, and it is probably about the relationship between people in general, about what people do to each other.

The work of John Lie A Fo is basically figurative, but he distorts the reality with elemental, quasi-primitive forms. Those forms are often a visualization of feelings: the rounded body of the woman releases the anger, the angular man clenches his teeth and restrains himself. The colors are usually also elementary. Red, blue, black and light yellow. The bright colors enhance the contrasts and set the scene for the story. Moreover, anger knows no nuance, not even in color.

This work reminds me of paintings and drawings from Jean-Michel Basquiat. The angular male figure especially, could have walked straight out of one of his works. Basquiat also reduced his figures to more simple shapes. He used a similar flat manner to put them in the space, or rather onto the space, as though he didn’t know what perspective or depth are. Artists from the COBRA-movement are another source of inspiration for Lie A Fo: the colors, the motile, expressionistic shapes and the (supposedly) naive style.

John Lie A Fo was born in Suriname. He left the country after the December murders. He moved to French Guyana, but spends a lot of time in Europe.

His work is often engaged. Violence, and particularly violence directed towards a people, can evoke his anger. He calls his painting ‘Cri du Maroni’ his personal ‘Guernica’ (after Picasso’s political masterpiece).

John Lie A Foe, 'Le cri du Maroni', acryl on wood, 120x244cm, 1986  / PHOTO From publication 'John Lie A Fo; Messenger from the jungle'

John Lie A Foe, ‘Le cri du Maroni’, acryl on wood, 120x244cm, 1986 / PHOTO From publication ‘John Lie A Fo; Messenger from the jungle’

The culture of the interior of ‘the Guyanas’ and the Caribbean culture in general, encourage him to make reference to it in his work. Within that larger context, this ‘serpent’ is reasonably restrained.

TEXT Rob Perrée, Paris, August 2014

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Want to see this and other work of John Lie A Fo ‘up close and personal’? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about John Lie A Fo please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/johnlieafo.

Print

A book about John Lie A Fo is available at Readytex Art Gallery for EURO 45. John Lie A Fo; Retrospective 1982 > 2012, Anne-Marie Pichart-Libert & David Redon (red.), Galerie L’Encadrier, 2012. ISBN 978-2-9543281

Cover

Cover

 

More work by John Lie A Fo available in Readytex Art Gallery:

John Lie A Fo, ’Gsembe - matjoema', acryl on canvas, 100x120cm, 2008 - USD 3200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

John Lie A Fo, ’Gsembe – matjoema’, acryl on canvas, 100x120cm, 2008 – USD 3200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

John Lie A Fo, ‘Rite’, mixed media on paper, 88x68cm, 2008 - USD 1750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

John Lie A Fo, ‘Rite’, mixed media on paper, 88x68cm, 2008 – USD 1750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

John Lie A Fo, ‘Untitled I '97’, mixed media on paper, 100x70cm, 1997 - USD 1750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

John Lie A Fo, ‘Untitled I ’97’, mixed media on paper, 100x70cm, 1997 – USD 1750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

LOGO eye for art

The 18th edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on August 27, 2014 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on August 27, 2014.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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Coming up: Opening ‘On the Move’ – Stedelijk Museum, August 28

August 25, 2014 at 10:07 am (Coming up) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

What: Opening On The Move – Stories in contemporary photography and graphic design. (also on Facebook).

on the move

Participating: Samira Ben Laloua, Ernst van der Hoeven and Frank Bruggeman │Marc Roig Blesa and Rogier Delfos │Verena Blok │ Sara Blokland │Olivier van Breugel and Simone Mudde │Persijn Broersen and Margit Lukács │Sarah Carlier │ Elspeth Diederix │ Meike Eggers and Michael Anhalt │ Ringel Goslinga │ Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen │ Robert Knoth and Antoinette de Jong │ Thomas Kuijpers │ Kadir van Lohuizen │ Anaïs Lopez, Eva Smallegange and Linda Braber | Hans van der Meer │ Theo Niekus │ Gábor Õsz │ Rune Peitersen │ Ahmet Polat │ Johannes Schwartz │ Petra Stavast │ Anoek Steketee and Eefje Blankevoort │ Martine Stig │ Nadine Stijns │ Andrea Stultiens │ Elisabeth Tonnard │ Witho Worms and Hans Gremmen

When: Opening night: August 28, 2014, 19:30-22:00 hrs. Open: August 29, 2014-January 18, 2015

Where: Stedelijk Museum, Museumplein, Amsterdam

 

Sarah Carlier, The Lamb (video still), 2013 / PHOTO Courtesy Sarah Carlier en LhGWR gallery

Sarah Carlier, The Lamb (video still), 2013 / PHOTO Courtesy Sarah Carlier en LhGWR gallery

The Stedelijk Museum opens the cultural season on August 28 with On The Move – Stories in contemporary photography and graphic design. On the Move (also on Facebook) is the new edition of the Voorstellen tot Gemeentelijke Kunstaankopen [Proposals for Municipal Art Acquisitions].

Sign up for the festive opening musical program compiled by the ‘Night Mayor’ of Amsterdam Mirik Milan, with DJs HOMEWORK and Cinema Royale!

More information via www.nachtburgemeesteramsterdam.nl.

On the Move (also on Facebook) shows the variety of ways in which artists and photographers working today, in dialogue with graphic designers. For the exhibition 28 projects have been selected, varying from young filmmakers to established artists.

More information about the exhibition: http://bit.ly/on-themove

OPENING PROGRAM
(do not be late because full = full)
19:30 hrs: Welcome
20:00 hrs: Opening by councilor for culture Kajsa Ollongren, Karin van Gilst (business director Stedelijk Museum), and Caroline Glazenburg and Anne Ruygt (curators of the exhibition).
20:15 hrs: Exhibition opening to the public.
22.00 hrs: End

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Sylvio Alatoe – Taking creative decisions founded on feelings

August 25, 2014 at 12:12 am (A Close Look, Outspoken) (, , , , , , )

Sylvio Alatoe (Galibi,1985) graduated from the Nola Hatterman Art Academy at the end of 2012. Even though he is no longer a student, he still always attends workshops and lessons when visiting-lecturers are present. He wants to keep developing himself as an artist and regards  it as being important to actively participate in artistic activities. He also conducts workshops for children. In his daily life he works as a government security officer. He hopes in the future to be able to fully devote himself to art. He was born in Galibi, in the district of Marowijne, and is proud of his indigenous origin.

Sylvio Alatoe with one of his paintings / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Sylvio Alatoe with one of his paintings / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Sylvio Alatoe was prominent at the National Art Fair 2013, which was held during Carifesta XI. He described his style in the catalogue as being ‘symbolic fantasy’. In a glance, when you look at the paintings, it is clear that there is a lot going on in the head (and heart) of this young , then still unknown artist.

PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2013

Sylvio Alatoe, ‘Dream’, 93×68,5 cm, 2013, National Art Fair 2013 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2013

PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2013

Sylvio Alatoe, ‘Paradise’, 86×70 cm, 2013, National Art Fair 2013 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2013

A work from the time that Alatoe was still a student at the NHAA. Sylvio Alatoe, 'My mother making cassava bread', installation at the expo 'A Kba, Ma A De Ete' in Fort Zeelandia, 2012 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2012

A work from the time that Alatoe was still a student at the NHAA. Sylvio Alatoe, ‘My mother making cassava bread’, installation at the expo ‘A Kba, Ma A De Ete’ in Fort Zeelandia, 2012 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2012

Detail from a work from the time that Alatoe was still a student at the NHAA. Sylvio Alatoe, 'My mother making cassava bread', installation at the expo 'A Kba, Ma A De Ete' in Fort Zeelandia, 2012 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2012

Detail from a work from the time that Alatoe was still a student at the NHAA. Sylvio Alatoe, ‘My mother making cassava bread’, installation at the expo ‘A Kba, Ma A De Ete’ in Fort Zeelandia, 2012 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2012

Even as a child he was always drawing. His mother said: ‘You always did those strange things. You were different.’ At the age of fourteen he went to the city. He stayed at Zaailand Boarding School in Zorg en Hoop. He was still continually busy with drawing. That was noticed and people asked that he come paint for them. That’s how he made a painting for a music formation, something which they could display during their performances. He laughs as he reminisces: ‘I bought water and oil paint and wanted to mix that. But that was totally unsuccessful.’ In the meantime Sylvio was stimulated by his brother-in-law to register himself at the Nola Hatterman Art Academy. ‘I thought that he was teasing me. I couldn’t believe that such a thing really existed: schooling for artists.’  He was taken there by his brother-in-law and Sylvio registered immediately.

Uitgesroken Sylvio Alatoe vrouw My Red Culture

Only women ‘write’ and decorate. The painted sun is a ‘maluana’, called a ‘tumero’ in Kalinha, with which Sylbi expresses his appreciation for women. Sylvio Alatoe, detail from untitled work, from ‘My Red Culture’, 2014 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Detail from untitled work, from 'My Red Culture', 2014 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Only women ‘write’ and decorate. The painted sun is a ‘maluana’, called a ‘tumero’ in Kalinha, with which Sylbi expresses his appreciation for women. Detail from Sylvio Alatoe’s untitled work, from ‘My Red Culture’, 2014 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

At Nola he especially learned to  utilize his feelings. To take creative decisions by listening to his feelings. ‘That is the foundation. And I also apply that in my daily life.’ Teachers as Humphrey Tawjoeram, George Struikelblok, Sunil Puljhun, Kurt Nahar, Kenneth Flijders . . . Their lessons  have made a deep impression on the young artist. Marcel Pinas is a big example. ‘He utilizes his culture, he doesn’t allow his things to die out. He doesn’t write it down, but displays it. I find that fantastic.’ He is also inspired by Anand Dwarka, especially due to his use of colors.

Sylvio Alatoe, untitled work, from 'My Red Culture', 2014 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Sylvio Alatoe, untitled work, from ‘My Red Culture’, 2014 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Sylvio Alatoe, untitled work, from 'My Red Culture', 2014 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Sylvio Alatoe, untitled work, from ‘My Red Culture’, 2014 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Sylvio Alatoe, untitled work, from 'My Red Culture', 2014 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

When a ‘piayman’ is deceased, music is made ​​with the ‘maraka’, and dancing until dawn. The colors in the background refer to the night turning into day. Sylvio Alatoe, untitled work, from ‘My Red Culture’, 2014 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Sylvio Alatoe’s most recent works are all about his indigenous culture: ‘My Red Culture’ is the tentative title of the exposition towards which he is working.  For Alatoe it is important to document something of his Carib culture. He explains that  little to nothing has been written down; the knowledge and stories are passed on orally. ‘The Piayman (Pronounce: p-eye-man) was and is the source of all knowledge. Everything goes through him, orally. I want to transfer such things.’

Sylvio Alatoe, untitled work, from 'My Red Culture', 2014 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Sylvio Alatoe, untitled work, from ‘My Red Culture’, 2014 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

He currently signs his work with “Sylbi”: ‘This symbolizes the cooperation between the spiritual and the physical. Sylvio is the name I got at birth, I use the first part of that: Syl. And bi comes from Galibi, which stands for the spiritual.’

What does he want to achieve with his art? ‘ I want to give people as my message that you can learn from art, and that you can express your feelings in art.’ I ask him how his mother finds it, what he does now. ‘She is happy.  “This is what you always were”, she says.’

Sylvio Alatoe, untitled work, from 'My Red Culture', 2014 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

The two sides that are part of life are depicted on the face of this indigenous man. Sylvio Alatoe, untitled work, from ‘My Red Culture’, 2014 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Sylvio Alatoe, detail from untitled work, from 'My Red Culture', 2014 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

The two sides that are part of life are depicted on the face of this indigenous man. Sylvio Alatoe, detail from untitled work, from ‘My Red Culture’, 2014 / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

TEXT Marieke Visser, Boxel, May 2014

TRANSLATION David F. Michael

Marieke Visser (Bennekom, the Netherlands, 1962) studied journalism and language and literature in the Netherlands. As publicist she writes a lot about art, culture, history and tourism from her own news agency Swamp Fish Press. Three large art projects to which she has recently contributed are: Wakaman Drawing lines, connecting dotsParamaribo SPAN and  Kibii Wi Koni Marcel Pinas The Event. She is currently editor in chief of Sranan Art Xposed.

This article was previously published, in Dutch, in the quarterly EFM Magazine (also on Facebook), nr. 9, July 2014. Subscripe to the free EFM newsmailing here. Sranan Art Xposed is in collaborates with EFM Magazine on the art & culture content.

aug2014front

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Dagmar de Kok – Fables from the oven

August 19, 2014 at 4:16 pm (A Close Look) (, )

Why do zebras have stripes, is the hippo hairless and do almost all birds fly except for the chicken? To find an answer you don’t have to consult the internet or the National Geographic, but need only to turn towards the ceramic works of Dagmar de Kok-Ngobese (1977).

Dagmar de Kok, work from the series 'Fabelachtig' [Fable-like], at the Ouder- en Kindcentrum [Parent- and Child  center] (OKC) Gaasperdam in Amsterdam Zuidoost / PHOTO Auke VanderHoek

Dagmar de Kok, work from the series ‘Fabelachtig’ [Fable-like], at the Ouder- en Kindcentrum [Parent- and Child center] (OKC) Gaasperdam in Amsterdam Zuidoost / PHOTO Auke VanderHoek

Because laying at the foundation of her newest series  ‘Fabelachtig’ [Fable-like] is the oral  tradition of South-African fairytales.  In these stories the animals native to Africa are the main characters.  Just as in the Caribbean  Anansi stories, each story contains life lessons. Both oral traditions have many similarities. Quite logical, because they share the same roots.

Dagmar de Kok, work from the series 'Fabelachtig' [Fable-like] / PHOTO Auke VanderHoek

Dagmar de Kok, work from the series ‘Fabelachtig’ [Fable-like] / PHOTO Auke VanderHoek

The need to express herself artistically and her passion for Africa, a continent which she has explored during two artist residencies, are palpable. De Kok does not literally translate the African fairy tales in clay, but always gives them her own twist. This results in new images, with new iconographic interpretations.

Dagmar de Kok, work from the series 'Fabelachtig' [Fable-like], at the Ouder- en Kindcentrum [Parent- and Child  center] (OKC) Gaasperdam in Amsterdam Zuidoost / PHOTO Bart Krieger

Dagmar de Kok, work from the series ‘Fabelachtig’ [Fable-like], at the Ouder- en Kindcentrum [Parent- and Child center] (OKC) Gaasperdam in Amsterdam Zuidoost / PHOTO Bart Krieger

Even more so, it is the humor and playfulness that link the work of De Kok with the original African stories.  Just like the images in clay, the stories speak to the imagination and bring a smile to your face. Take for instance the story about why the chicken and the dog are animals for in the yard. According to traditional African lore, the chicken and the dog originally lived in the sky, just like the birds. Until on one ill fated day all the food in the sky had run out. The dog was sent to the earth to look for food. He did not return. What was going on? The birds decided to send the chicken down to investigate. But they never returned either. What happened: the chicken and the dog found everything they needed in the yards of the humans and thus permanently exchanged the skies for the earth. This is why the chicken no longer flies, the dog is ‘man’s best friend’ and the skies are rife with ‘hungry’ birds.

De Kok, has executed this story in two separate sculpture groups. The part with the dog on a richly ornamental base, suggesting abundance. Attached to the ceiling above that, a cloud that is inhabited by the birds. Through the use of material, color, mass and not in the least the connecting story, a synergy is unearthed. However, both parts in and of themselves posses sufficient expressiveness and iconographical value, which is why they can also be displayed separately. Stronger yet, De Kok aims to continue the artistic investigation into ‘fable-like’, to increasingly experiment with disconnecting parts of fables, and thus tell never existing fables ‘all over again’ in ceramic sculpture groups.

Dagmar de Kok / PHOTO Courtesy Dagmar de Kok

Dagmar de Kok / PHOTO Courtesy Dagmar de Kok

In the artistic application of glazed and unglazed material, a cross-pollination seems to occur between flora and fauna. The skin of the animals for example, is often reminiscent of a grassy plain, a lunar landscape, or a rock formation eroded by a river.  The landscape elements of her sculpture, on the other hand, often have animal-like characteristics and look like coral reefs where things are quite beastly and the law of the fittest applies.

Dagmar de Kok, zebra / PHOTO Courtesy Dagmar de Kok

Dagmar de Kok, zebra / PHOTO Courtesy Dagmar de Kok

Dagmar de Kok, deer / PHOTO Courtesy Dagmar de Kok

Dagmar de Kok, deer / PHOTO Courtesy Dagmar de Kok

Her most recent work is in front of the Ouder- en Kindcentrum [Parent- and Child  center] (OKC) Gaasperdam in Amsterdam Zuidoost. This is where her first outdoor sculpture was unveiled on February 19th 2014. Here she also found inspiration in African storytelling tradition.  As inspiration for this sculpture group ‘Stoet’ De Kok choose the story of the discarded dog. While looking for a better future, the dog playfully found new animal friends.  The moral of the story being, that through friendship and  cooperation, even the largest of obstacles can be successfully overcome. Growing up and making friends naturally also has everything to do with the task of the OKC as supporter in raising children.

Dagmar de Kok, work from the series 'Fabelachtig' [Fable-like] / PHOTO Courtesy Dagmar de Kok

Dagmar de Kok, work from the series ‘Fabelachtig’ [Fable-like] / PHOTO Courtesy Dagmar de Kok

Dagmar de Kok, work from the series 'Fabelachtig' [Fable-like] / PHOTO Courtesy Dagmar de Kok

Dagmar de Kok, work from the series ‘Fabelachtig’ [Fable-like] / PHOTO Courtesy Dagmar de Kok

Dagmar de Kok, work from the series 'Fabelachtig' [Fable-like] / PHOTO Courtesy Dagmar de Kok

Dagmar de Kok, work from the series ‘Fabelachtig’ [Fable-like] / PHOTO Courtesy Dagmar de Kok

With outdoor art there are however several aspects involved, that ‘studio artists’ are never faced with. The sculpture-group had to, for instance, consist of multiple sculptures, be climbable, safe and  it had to be developed in collaboration with the users of the OKC, according to the client Stadsdeel Zuidoost. Through a series of workshops, the students from two elementary schools near the OKC, shared their ideas with De Kok. The students also came up with various inspiring ideas for the skin in their works.

Dagmar de Kok, work from the series 'Fabelachtig' [Fable-like], at the Ouder- en Kindcentrum [Parent- and Child  center] (OKC) Gaasperdam in Amsterdam Zuidoost / PHOTO Bart Krieger

Dagmar de Kok, work from the series ‘Fabelachtig’ [Fable-like], at the Ouder- en Kindcentrum [Parent- and Child center] (OKC) Gaasperdam in Amsterdam Zuidoost / PHOTO Bart Krieger

Dagmar de Kok, work from the series 'Fabelachtig' [Fable-like], at the Ouder- en Kindcentrum [Parent- and Child  center] (OKC) Gaasperdam in Amsterdam Zuidoost / PHOTO Bart Krieger

Dagmar de Kok, work from the series ‘Fabelachtig’ [Fable-like], at the Ouder- en Kindcentrum [Parent- and Child center] (OKC) Gaasperdam in Amsterdam Zuidoost / PHOTO Bart Krieger

Dagmar de Kok, work from the series 'Fabelachtig' [Fable-like], at the Ouder- en Kindcentrum [Parent- and Child  center] (OKC) Gaasperdam in Amsterdam Zuidoost / PHOTO Bart Krieger

Dagmar de Kok, work from the series ‘Fabelachtig’ [Fable-like], at the Ouder- en Kindcentrum [Parent- and Child center] (OKC) Gaasperdam in Amsterdam Zuidoost / PHOTO Bart Krieger

De Kok however, is used to working small. That has everything to do with clay, the medium that she works with. The oven in which she fires her pieces, is also a restricting factor. The choice was made to have the models blown up in polyutherane foam and subsequently have them coated in polyester by Blowups Reclameobjecten B.V. In this partnership De Kok got the opportunity to, while in the process of enlargement, put the finishing touches to the animals in the studio of  Blowups.

They have become a kind of contemporary, three-dimensional totem poles, that also bring to mind the European folk tale  ‘De Bremer straatmuzikanten’. Just as in her smaller work, she went in search of an artistic interpretation for the animals. She once again found this in the  finishing of the skin.

To increase the ability to climb it, De Kok decided to stack the animals in three separate sculptures. By positioning the animals in one walking direction towards the entrance of the building, not only is the entrance emphasized, but a cohesion is achieved between the sculpture-group, the plaza and the building. This cohesion is further underlined by the safety surfacing (to prevent playing children from getting hurt) which frames the whole like an oasis complete with shadows.

Dagmar de Kok is also affiliated with Galerie De Ploegh, in Soest, the Netherlands.

 

The above analysis was written in response to the unveiling of ‘Stoet’ on February 19, 2014, and the exhibition Nieuw! Buitenkunst in Zuidoost, in CBK Zuidoost, Amsterdam Zuidoost. This was on display until March 22, 2014.

TEXT Bart Krieger

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld

Bart Krieger (1970) writes about art and culture for among other things, the digital magazine SAX and newsmagazine Parbode. After his education in art history at the  ‘Vrije Universiteit’, he started as a journalist for Het Parool (art- and city editor). For the past six years he was employed as a policy officer at the art councils of Rotterdam and Amsterdam.

 

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Collected by Michel and Cynthia Frangie – René Tosari

August 15, 2014 at 5:28 pm (Collected) (, , , , )

You step into a tasteful home filled with colors and shapes. Their appreciation for the work of Surinamese artists  shows clearly on every wall of every room in the house. The couple Michel and Cynthia Frangie has, through the years, acquired a significant art collection, which time wise spans almost half a century. Some time ago they generously made a number of their paintings available for use in the two greatest overview exhibitions of art from Suriname, Twintig Jaar Beeldende Kunst in Suriname, 1975-1995 [Twenty years visual art in Suriname], which were held in the Surinaams Museum in Fort Zeelandia in Paramaribo (November 24, 1995-February 1996) and subsequently in the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam (December 16, 1996- February 16, 1997). They gladly share their love for art with others.

René Tosari, untitled / PHOTO Marieke Visser

René Tosari, untitled / PHOTO Marieke Visser

Amongst the many paintings of at least fifteen prominent artists  – such as Remy Jungerman, Reinier Asmoredjo, Ron Flu, William Lie, Jules Chin A Foeng, Oetoen, Soekinta, Winston van der Bok, Erwin de Vries and Glenn Fung Loy it is noticeable that one artist in this group is represented very well indeed.  Etchings, prints and paintings from several of his style-periods are carefully framed; they are hung in important places throughout the home, or in some cases, hidden in intimate spaces which encourage relaxation and introspection. Why such an obvious preference for René Tosari?

René Tosari, untitled / PHOTO Marieke Visser

René Tosari, untitled / PHOTO Marieke Visser

René Tosari, untitled / PHOTO Marieke Visser

René Tosari, untitled / PHOTO Marieke Visser

Between the Frangies and this artist, there exists a friendship of more than 30 years.  At one time they met for purely practical reasons: the businessman from the manufacturing business was in need of advice about printing and painting on textiles which he imported, and the artist was brought forward as the most suitable expert. Tosari invited Michel Frangie to visit his studio and ever since that initial encounter they have remained friends. At one of his first exhibitions, in Theater Thalia (May 24-31, 1989), the couple bought several of the works on display. To some extent this was intended as encouragement and support, but also because they were truly  moved by his creations. One of their favorite paintings by Tosari is ‘Hongersnood’ [Famine] (it shows a mother with a baby). But the blue portrait of a woman and a landscape in which a ‘kappa’, an iron sugar pan, are portrayed, are also amongst the favorites.

René Tosari, 'Hongersnood' [Famine] / PHOTO Marieke Visser

René Tosari, ‘Hongersnood’ [Famine] / PHOTO Marieke Visser

René Tosari, untitled / PHOTO Marieke Visser

René Tosari, untitled / PHOTO Marieke Visser

René Tosari, untitled / PHOTO Marieke Visser

René Tosari, untitled / PHOTO Marieke Visser

Of the two, Cynthia Frangie is truly the large art lover.  “I love art, I love beautiful things. Very modern paintings don’t appeal to me. Although I can occasionally appreciate abstract works because of the colors, I want to be able to tell what it is that a painting portrays.”

René Tosari, untitled / PHOTO Marieke Visser

René Tosari, untitled / PHOTO Marieke Visser

Michel Frangie especially admires his friends character: “If Tosari wants to do something, he does his utmost to achieve it.”, he says. Cynthia has more of an eye for his artistic nature and calls him a truly good painter. She started buying his work since early in his career and says proudly: “I think that we have the most beautiful collection of etchings by Tosari.”

René Tosari, untitled / PHOTO Marieke Visser

René Tosari, untitled / PHOTO Marieke Visser

René Tosari, untitled / PHOTO Marieke Visser

René Tosari, untitled / PHOTO Marieke Visser

TEXT Chandra van Binnendijk

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld

Chandra van Binnendijk (Paramaribo, 1953) is editor and publicist. From 1977 until 1988 she was part of the news editors of various newspapers and radio stations, and was a correspondent for various Caribbean media. After ten years she said goodbye to active journalism and is since focusing mostly on culture, art and history. She has co-written several art publications amongst which  Twintig jaar beeldende kunst in Suriname 1975 – 1995 (Amsterdam, KIT Publishers, 1995) and she was author and compiler of the art catalogue Zichtbaar (Paramaribo, 2005) about the art collection of De Surinaamsche Bank. Recent publications in which she was involved as co-author and co-compiler are Bouwstenen voor een betere wereld. 250 jaar vrijmetselarij in Suriname (Paramaribo, 2011) and TOR. A People’s Business (Paramaribo, 2012).

 

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‘Wanderlust’ – Group exhibition in CBK Amsterdam Zuidoost, August 21–October 18, 2014

August 15, 2014 at 2:14 pm (Coming up) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

What: Wanderlust (also on Facebook), a group exhibition with Yasser Ballemans, Wouter Klein Velderman, Charlotte Schleiffert, Lydia Schouten, Berend Strik, Su Tomesen and Jolijn de Wolf. Curator: Sasha Dees

When: August 21-October 18, 2014. Tue, Wed: 11:00-17:00 hrs, Thu: 11:00-20:00 hrs, Fri: 11:00-17:00 hrs and Sat 10:00-17:00 hrs. The opening reception will be held August 21, 2014 from 17:00-19:00 hrs 

Where: CBK Zuidoost (also on Facebook), Anton de Komplein 120, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

At the moment the exhibition is being installed. A photo album of the installation can be seen here

Installing ... / PHOTO Courtesy Sasha Dees

Installing … / PHOTO Courtesy Sasha Dees

Special event: September 18, 17:00-18:30 hrs. Art café, in conjuction with the exhibition Wanderlust (also on Facebook). A panel discussion about the meaning, importance and value of international artist in residencies. Guests: Berend Strik (artist in Wanderlust), Mayke Jongsma (Mondriaan Foundation), Jaco Brinkman or Rob Knijn (Heden) & Sasha Dees (curator Wanderlust), moderated by Renske De Jong (curator CBK Zuidoost). Several perspectives will be discussed: the artist, the art critic, the sponsor and the participating art institution.

Poster

Poster

 

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness” – Mark Twain

Central to the exhibition is the importance and influence travel has on artists and their work. Most of the selected artists wander(ed) to a great number of countries, for shorter or longer times, supported by the Mondriaan Foundation or on their own merits. There is always that strong desire and impulse to travel and explore the world, to learn and be inspired. They continuously expand their art practice by applying their encounters, experiences, new insights and knowledge, acquired while wandering, in their work and/or work methods.

Yasser Ballemans, 'Carrus Navalis no. 11', porcelain, 46x30x33cm, 2012 / PHOTO Courtesy artist

Yasser Ballemans, ‘Carrus Navalis no. 11′, porcelain, 46x30x33cm, 2012 / PHOTO Courtesy artist

Yasser Ballemans went to Institute Buena Bista in Curacao in the carnival period and engaged with carnival as sculptural and cultural manifestation. He is interested in the relationship between the identity of the individual participant and the disappearing into the mob. He continued this research and it has become a continuous theme in his work. Yasser Ballemans works with sculpture, installation and performance. Ballemans works are physical manifestations of a highly negotiable reality. Is the sculpture more real than the model of the sculpture? Is the body, in its carnival-posture and temporary outfit, less real in its claiming a new identity and new roles that are different from our everyday habits? www.yasserballemans.nl

Charlotte Schleiffert, 'Despite armed guards, Africa’s rhino’s losing battle to poachers', mixed technique on paper, 300×150cm, 2013 / PHOTO Courtesy artist

Charlotte Schleiffert, ‘Despite armed guards, Africa’s rhino’s losing battle to poachers’, mixed technique on paper, 300×150cm, 2013 / PHOTO Courtesy artist

Travel is an ongoing well of inspiration for Charlotte Schleiffert‘s choice of subject and materials as is shown in the works made in Indonesia where her figurines wear masks as we know them from the Indonesian traditional performing arts as she comments in text on international news events and their impact. Charlotte Schleiffert life-size figures in her drawings and paintings are fertile soil for Charlotte Schleiffert’s fantasy, based on power and suppression. Besides the fact that passionate women are central in her work, she feels committed to the social and political movements of our global society in general. “Schleiffert’s area of interest comprises outspoken physical figures and human impulse. She does not subdue this drive with gentle amorousness nor does she eroticize. Her topics serve her expressive capacities, as she pursues the right painting with intellect and fury.”(W.A.L. Beeren).Her work is raw and sensual, direct without hypocrisy. It is suggestive, balancing between abstract compositions and figurative forms. www.charlotteschleiffert.com

Lydia Schouten, 'Plantage Wechi’, mixed media, 100x140cm, 2010 / PHOTO Courtesy artist

Lydia Schouten, ‘Plantage Wechi’, mixed media, 100x140cm, 2010 / PHOTO Courtesy artist

Lydia Schouten while reading the book Zoutrif by Miriam Sluis explored Curacao with a machete looking for old plantation mansions that found their way into her work. Lydia Schouten is a multimedia artist, performer and video artist. Schouten’s work can be divided into three periods: an exploration of performance art from 1978 to 1981; a period of work in video from 1981 to 1988; and since then, an ongoing interest in installation, often combining video, sound, photographic components and drawing. In all three periods certain thematic elements are apparent at Schouten’s work. Femininity, isolation and the relation of mass media with sex and death are a few of the most frequent ones. www.lydiaschouten.com

Berend Strik, 'Homeless people living in Jogjakarta cemetery', 140x70cm, mixed media, 2013 / PHOTO Courtesy artist

Berend Strik, ‘Homeless people living in Jogjakarta cemetery’, 140x70cm, mixed media, 2013 / PHOTO Courtesy artist

Berend Strik found in Indonesia the excitement, passion and curiosity for the arts that he feels has been missing in Europe lately. It relit his fire and his own passion for making art and he became actively involved in the western discourse about contemporary art in non – western settings and their importance. Berend Strik prefers the word “stitching” over “embroidery” in reference to his own practice; for Strik, the latter is necessarily image-based, whereas the former simply refers to attaching one material on top of another. Strik makes c-prints of photographs he takes during his travels, and then highlights parts of the compositions by sewing fabric onto the images. In his words, he uses “stitching to make part of the photographs more physical.” By perforating them with a needle and thread, the two-dimensional quality of the image is disrupted, creating a work that is both tactile and conceptually driven. www.berendstrik.com

Su Tomesen  'Warung Makan Kakilima', video, 1.11 min, 2012 / STILL Courtesy artist

Su Tomesen ‘Warung Makan Kakilima’, video, 1.11 min, 2012 / STILL Courtesy artist

Su Tomesen met her Javanese husband and divides her time between the Netherlands and Indonesia: “My speed of working decelerated. When doing a residence of three or four months it’s like being in a rice cooker, right now I have a lifelong relationship with a place.” Su Tomesen is a visual artist working in the media video, photography and installation. Most of her work evolves from traveling, and immersing herself in urban (sub) cultures. A recurring theme in her socially involved work is expressions of ingenuity and human resourcefulness in public space. Her previous education as a historian, and work as a director and researcher for television, is integrated in her art practice. She has been fortunate to see a lot of the world as artist-in-residence on various continents. She considers herself a type of cross-cultural ambassador when showing works she realized elsewhere in the world; for example, exposing an audience in Amsterdam to an installation from Amman, presenting her videos from Johannesburg in Yerevan, or giving artist talks wherever she goes. www.sutomesen.nl

Wouter Klein Velderman, 'Ivory & Pride edition 9', 16.5meterx30cmx30cm, PVC/wood, 2014 / PHOTO Courtesy artist

Wouter Klein Velderman, ‘Ivory & Pride edition 9′, 16.5meterx30cmx30cm, PVC/wood, 2014 / PHOTO Courtesy artist

Wouter Klein Velderman‘s sculptures where all conceived by his own hands. While in residence at Tembe Art in Moengo, Suriname he found himself expanding to trust others as decision makers. Working with a group of people accelerated his work into bigger site specific projects that involve workers, volunteers and collaborators. Wouter Klein Velderman uses materials and themes for his sculptures and installations that often have an industrial-like character. Metal, PVC-canvas and wood are the ingredients to depict matters like transport, mobility and storage. Even though their subjects tend to have an industrial character, the sculptures have quite an opposite feeling to them: vulnerable, delicate, and refined. By treating the harsh, impersonal materials endlessly, with great care and tenderness, the sculptures come into contrast with their subject. A huge pile of wood waste in the jungle of Suriname could result into the tallest Mickey Mouse sculpture of South America that somehow becomes a functional object. www.wouterkleinvelderman.nl

Jolijn de Wolf, 'Thanksgiving', video 4.41 min, 2011 / STILL Courtesy artist

Jolijn de Wolf, ‘Thanksgiving’, video 4.41 min, 2011 / STILL Courtesy artist

Jolijn de Wolf’s stay at ARTCEB in the Amazon jungle in Suriname felt like an awakening, it forced her to think about her art practice and became a more conscious artist looking for an honest and mindful connecting between the viewer and her. Jolijn de Wolf investigates the connection between the self, the others and the universe. She emphasizes on the use of our intuition in this process. Our intuition often seems to be heavily overruled by our rational thoughts. Therefore we forget this amazing skill we have: the ability to connect to each other and the world around us. What would happen if we would allow ourselves to connect? de Wolf tries to capture this process of connecting or disconnecting by freezing a moment in time. Materializing inner processes by making an image. Making an image of this blissful state we can be in when we are totally connected. Or how alone and lost we can feel when we are disconnected. Capturing the consciousness we need to understand life and to live it fully. Wolf continued working in nature in remote places and after Surname spend extensive time in Iceland. www.jolijndewolf.com

This exhibit is in part made possible by: Stadsdeel Amsterdam Zuidoost.

Thanks to: Tirzo Martha / IBB; Marcel Pinas / Tembe Art Studio; Mella Jaarsma / Cemeti Art House; Rob Knijn / Heden; Rinaldo Klas, Ada Korbee, Mayke Jongsma / Mondriaan Foundation.

Sasha Dees (Amsterdam/New York) lives and breaths wanderlust. Dees is an independent curator / cultural producer working on international collaborative or exchange projects. Her focus is on emerging interdisciplinary artists that push boundaries. With her projects she creates a dialogue that offers a new perspective.  www.sashadees.com

Instituto Buena Bista (IBB) The residency programs (AIR, IPS and the local residency) at the Instituto Buena Bista Curacao Center for Contemporary Art are created to challenge the visiting artists to get out of their comfort zone and to step into an experimental creative wild ride. The rural and basic context of the island defies al the structures and systems the artists are used to. The challenge will manifest itself starting in the way they communicate their concepts to the students and the public, the limitations of available materials and the context available for the presentation of their works. www.mondriaanfonds.nl/Aanvragen/item/IBB/Buitenland_ateliers/

Cemeti Art House gives artists the opportunity in their work processes to undertake research, experiment and eventually collaborate. The residency activities will be divided into several phases: an orientation and an introduction, a work period and a final presentation. The artists get connected to diverse arts communities in Yogyakarta and interaction with the public and contribution to the art discourse are important in this programme. 

www.mondriaanfonds.nl/Aanvragen/item/cemeti_art_house/Buitenland_ateliers

ARTCEB functions as a laboratory where participants are encouraged to experiment with technical and artistic possibilities to develop new work. The participants are expected to work with the highest possible degree of independence. Artists from all over the world are welcomed to the opportunity to encounter this inspiring environment in all its essence and experience working in primeval forests. ARTCEB is located in Botopasi located at the Suriname River near the Amazon rainforest.

Tembe Art Studio welcomes artists of all disciplines to apply for a residency at the Tembe Art Studio. For a period of 1 to 3 months the AiR will complete its project in the district of Marowijne. Artists will be greatly impressed and inspired by the wealth of natural and cultural resources of Suriname. The artists who are visiting Moengo use the time they spend there for inspiration and reflections. They get their inspirations from the nature and culture. Moengo is neither a city nor a village and has other ways of living than many are accustomed to. This encourages creativity. The place Moengo is a natural tranquility, which is unprecedented for city dwellers and is therefore an ideal place for reflection. www.mondriaanfonds.nl/Aanvragen/item/Tembe_Art_Studio/Buitenland_ateliers

Also read: ARC Magazine and Africanah.org.

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An Eye for Art: Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi – ‘Window 32′

August 13, 2014 at 1:39 pm (An Eye for Art) (, , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed an informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week he talks about ‘Window 32’, acrylics on wood, 30 cm wide x 30 cm high, 2013, from Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi.

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Window 32’, acrylics on wood, 30x30cm, 2013 - USD 275 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Window 32’, acrylics on wood, 30x30cm, 2013 – USD 275 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

It might seem strange to call an exhibition of your paintings Short Stories. For Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi that is not so. Although her work might tend towards realism, she does no more than give a suggestion of the reality. As a viewer she leaves you with enough room to imagine your own ‘short story’. This work, ‘Window 32’, is a good example thereof. It depicts a window as you are likely to encounter in many places in Suriname. By painting it on wood, she incorporates a peculiar sort of alienation. As if she has taken a bite out of the real house and then mounted it on a wall. Painting is after all, usually done on canvas or paper. Because of the way in which she paints – streaky, with open spaces – she does indicate clearly that the viewer is indeed dealing with a painting. Confusing.

It is also confusing that people are missing in the painting, but that as a viewer you are instantly inclined to imagine them in it. It is a window of a house where people live. The curtain at least, is proof of that.

In short, with her works Tjon Pian Gi conjures up stories. She stimulates the fantasy of the viewer by initially putting him on the wrong track. And then, in addition to this, she puts herself in the place of the viewer: she writes short stories inspired by her own work. She falls into the category of double talents such as Lucebert, Hugo Claus, Jan Wolkers, Charlotte Mutsaers and others. Because her stories are also suggestive – they are more like poems – she manages to stimulate the viewer with those as well. What she does with paint, she does also with words.

When you look at the oeuvre of Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, it becomes clear that women play an important role in her work. Strong women, women who are trying to survive. But that attention for women, can also be indicative of attention for her immediate surroundings. That includes other people who are living out their fantasies, or colorful birds, or the overwhelming nature of Vermont, or the street scenery of Paramaribo in which houses determine the decor.

Contrary to what you may think of this work, tempted by the content, it is in fact very small. Tjon Pian Gi plays with multiple strange elements.

TEXT Rob Perrée, Amsterdam, July 2014

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Want to see this and other work of Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi ‘up close and personal’? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/kitlingtjonpiangi.

Print

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi also published two books, still available at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo.

De kracht van vrouwen/The Strength of Women

De kracht van vrouwen/The Strength of Women, available for SRD 10 at Readytex Art Gallery.

KL F

More work by Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi available in Readytex Art Gallery:

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Window 33’, acrylics on wood, 30x30cm, 2013 - USD 275 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Window 33’, acrylics on wood, 30x30cm, 2013 – USD 275 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Mercredi des Cendres 9 Witch 2’, acrylics on wood, 30x30cm, 2012 - USD 275 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Mercredi des Cendres 9 Witch 2’, acrylics on wood, 30x30cm, 2012 – USD 275 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Petrogliefen uit het land van Jayvredice 4’, acrylics on canvas, 80x80cm, 2009 - USD 750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Petrogliefen uit het land van Jayvredice 4’, acrylics on canvas, 80x80cm, 2009 – USD 750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Woman Artist I’, acrylics on canvas, 90x90cm, 2008 - USD 750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Woman Artist I’, acrylics on canvas, 90x90cm, 2008 – USD 750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Down Stream’, oil on hardboard, 80x80cm, 2006 - USD 500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Down Stream’, oil on hardboard, 80x80cm, 2006 – USD 500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

For the project The Strength of Women Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi made a video production. This is a fragment:

LOGO eye for art

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on August 13, 2014 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on August 13, 2014.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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Lazy Nights @ DeKuS – August 15, 16 & 17, 2014

August 13, 2014 at 12:32 pm (Coming up, Hot Spots) (, , , , , , , , , , )

laz

What: Lazy Nights @ DeKuS, with the spectacular introduction of the new high end super luxurious hammocks and hammock stands and other cozy lounge furniture. Also in da house: Tan Bun Skrati (also on Facebook), Daniel’s Deli, Cocktail Masters, fine wines, a DJ and more! Don’t be late, just be lazy!

When: August 15, 16 and 17, 2014. Every evening from 17:00-22:00 hrs

Where: Frederik Derbystraat 44, Paramaribo, Suriname

Lazy Nights @ DeKuS - Tan Bun Skrati

Lazy Nights @ DeKuS – Tan Bun Skrati

 

Lazy Nights @ DeKuS

Lazy Nights @ DeKuS


HOT SPOTS – DeKuS, Design en Kunst van Suriname [Design and Art from Suriname]

Those wanting to look at art in Suriname, have several venues to choose from. But … first you need to know that they exist! The most obvious spot is Readytex Art Gallery, a familiar address amongst art lovers for over twenty years now. But there is more, and SAX takes you along on a journey past the hot spots, the best locations when it comes to art! In this first  edition: DeKuS, Design en Kunst van Suriname [Design and Art from Suriname] (website, also on Facebook). In July 2014 DeKuS celebrated her third birthday.

IMG_9539

 

Owner/founder Annette Bijman is clear about it: “I do not pretend to be a gallery. I don’t organize vernissages; I don’t hold any exhibitions here. I work with a fixed group of people who have simply come across my path. Everything is a result of circumstance. I want to work only with nice people.” This she has succeeded in.

She works with among others Warda Marica, Janny Banssia, Debora Linga from Atelier Folo (on Facebook), Ken Doorson, Oscar Adogo, Tan Bun Skrati (also on Facebook), Matoekoe and Lloyd Strijder, to name a few.

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The folder states: “DeKuS is a platform where Surinamese designers, photographers, artists and craftsmen offer their exceptional products.” While talking with Annette Bijman it becomes apparent that furniture forms the ‘core business’ of this charming art/crafts store, which indeed functions as a platform.  Furniture with a sustainable character and a special charisma: certainly no standard benches and stools. Samba Furniture (on Facebook) has been visibly present right from the start.  Sleek design, radiating warmth, made from hardwood harvested from the manmade lake called ‘stuwmeer’.  There are also products from the Guyanese furniture company Liana Cane, and from the Surinamese company Sewa Furniture (also on Facebook). And of course, that unique table by Ken Doorson, from his furniture line Space is the place.

Ken Doorson, 'Saturn', frame: tropical hard wood zwarte kabbes (Sucupira)/glass: Ken Doorson painting printed on glass

Ken Doorson, ‘Saturn’, frame: tropical hard wood zwarte kabbes (Sucupira)/glass: Ken Doorson painting printed on glass

Samba Furniture

Samba Furniture

Samba Furniture

Samba Furniture

There are plans galore.  The garden at the back of the store will be used for the Caribbean High Tea-happening. “DeKuS is also a location provider, for instance also for an After Work @ DeKuS-drink. Furthermore I want to create a separation between DeKuS Living and DeKuS Fashion. And we will also start spreading our wings towards the Caribbean.”

Except for ‘sustainability’ and ‘quality’, words like ‘dynamic’ and ‘original’ also  apply to this location.

IMG_9560IMG_9561 IMG_9563

  • DeKuS, Design en Kunst uit Suriname, Frederik Derbystraat 44, Paramaribo, +597 470 121 / (0)719 9461, e-mail info@de-kus.com, website, also on Facebook | Open: Monday thru Friday 09:00-16:30 & Saturday 08:30-13:30

IMG_9562

TEXT Marieke Visser, 2014

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Previously published in Sranan Art Xposed, nr. 9, April 2014

 

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Coming up: A. Murugesan – ‘Beyond Horizons: An Exhibition of Watercolours’

August 7, 2014 at 9:17 am (Coming up) (, , , , , , , )

What: solo-exhibition Beyond Horizons: An Exhibition of Watercolours, by A. Murugesan (artist’s blog)

Where: De Hal (Facebook), Grote Combéweg 45, Paramaribo

When: August 8-11, 2014. Opening hours: 17:00-21:00 hrs

Entrance: free

A. Murugesan, 'Banana plantation' / PHOTO Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan, ‘Banana plantation’ / PHOTO Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan, 'Boats of Luneberg' / PHOTO Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan, ‘Boats of Luneberg’ / PHOTO Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan, 'Bonistraat' / PHOTO Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan, ‘Bonistraat’ / PHOTO Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan, 'Cosmos white' / PHOTO Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan, ‘Cosmos white’ / PHOTO Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan, 'Lotus II' / PHOTO Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan, ‘Lotus II’ / PHOTO Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan, 'Sunrise over Suriname River' / PHOTO Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan, ‘Sunrise over Suriname River’ / PHOTO Courtesy A. Murugesan

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A quote from a preview of the exhibition by the critic Ivan A. Khayiat: “Muru’s art is lifelike and direct; it is full of vitality – a refreshing spectacle to behold!”

A. Murugesan, also known as Muru, the husband of India’s top diplomat in Suriname, was born more than five decades ago in Tamil Nadu, India. Initially Muru studied art in The Hague, the Netherlands. He presented his first work as part of an exhibition in the Ukraine in 2005.

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Artist’s Statement

The freshness and immediacy of watercolours, their translucency and vibrancy always attracted me, Though difficult to master, watercolour kindles my passion and throws a challenge every time I approach the paper with paint. I hope you enjoy the paintings as much I enjoyed painting them!”

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A. Murugesan Catalogue front / IMAGE Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan Catalogue front / IMAGE Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan Catalogue back / IMAGE Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan Catalogue back / IMAGE Courtesy A. Murugesan

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