An Eye for Art: Dhiradj Ramsamoedj ‘I Sculpture Paramaribo II’ and ‘I Sculpture Paramaribo VI’

October 22, 2014 at 11:58 am (An Eye for Art) (, , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed an informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week he talks about ‘I Sculpure Paramaribo II’ and ‘I Sculpture Paramaribo VI’, acryl on canvas, 114 cm wide x 80 cm high, 2014, from Dhiradj Ramsamoedj.

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, 'I Sculpture Paramaribo II', acryl on canvas, 114x80cm, 2014 - USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, ‘I Sculpture Paramaribo II’, acryl on canvas, 114x80cm, 2014 – USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, 'I Sculpture Paramaribo VI', acryl on canvas, 114x80cm, 2014 - USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, ‘I Sculpture Paramaribo VI’, acryl on canvas, 114x80cm, 2014 – USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

He has been talking about it for years. Dhiradj Ramsamoedj (Paramaribo, 1986) would love to create a sculpture park somewhere around Paramaribo. Or place sculptures at characteristic locations in the city. Just like other plans of such a dreamy nature, it’s difficult to have them realized. They usually get stuck somewhere in the sketch phase and then quietly disappear in an ever greedy drawer.

These works attest to the fact that he did not let that happen. He has converted them into a series of paintings.

These works at least visualize what his intention was. Sculptures or sculpture groupings in clear view of recognizable, familiar buildings. But there is more that they visualize. In contrast to the buildings, the human figures of Dhiradj Ramsamoedj are far from the reality. They have deformed bodies with strange heads, but without faces. From their postures some information might possibly be derived. Arrogance? Despite their nakedness, their gender remains unclear. They look like creatures from another planet. The paintings remind me of scenes from a thrilling  science-fiction film. That sense of suspense is not just created by the strange creatures, but also by the surroundings. Although they might be familiar, the use of color, the shadows and the black lines make them seem ominous. As though there is dramatic change in weather coming up.

In all of his works Ramsamoedj ultimately portrays an image of people. His ‘Flexible Man’, constructed from colorful scraps of material is a prime example thereof. I cannot shake off the impression that his image of mankind shows negative traits. His people seem to withdraw from their environment. They seem to have no regard for these surroundings. Didn’t Ramsamoedj make an empty-plastic-bottle sculpture, drifting on the Suriname River, at the beginning of his art career? As a kind of symbol of pollution? Is the approaching storm sensation that these paintings generate, not a portrayal of the consequences?  Is his flexible man not just a disguised conformist who doesn’t want to stand for anything?

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, 'Flexible Man' / PHOTO Roy Tjin

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, ‘Flexible Man’ / PHOTO Roy Tjin

If this explanation makes sense, then there is every reason to place the sculptures of  Ramsamoedj on strategic locations in the city. They at least provide some food for thought. And in the meantime they break the code that sculptures in public spaces should always represent pride, glorification or remembrance.

TEXT Rob Perrée, Amsterdam, October, 2014

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Want to see this and other work of Dhiradj Ramsamoedj ‘up close and personal’? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Dhiradj Ramsamoedj please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/dhiradjramsamoedj.

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More work by Dhiradj Ramsamoedj available in Readytex Art Gallery:

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, 'I Sculpture Paramaribo III', acryl on canvas, 114x80cm, 2014 - USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, ‘I Sculpture Paramaribo III’, acryl on canvas, 114x80cm, 2014 – USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, 'De Beschermer' [The Protector], acryl on canvas, 114x100cm, 2014 - USD 700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, ‘De Beschermer’ [The Protector], acryl on canvas, 114x100cm, 2014 – USD 700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, 'You and me', oil on canvas, 150x110cm, 2010 - USD 800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, ‘You and me’, oil on canvas, 150x110cm, 2010 – USD 800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, 'A Story of My Own VI', acryl on canvas, 119x129cm, 2010 - USD 800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, ‘A Story of My Own VI’, acryl on canvas, 119x129cm, 2010 – USD 800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, '', oil on canvas, 40x65cm, 2008 - USD 165 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, ”, oil on canvas, 40x65cm, 2008 – USD 165 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, 'A Subtraction of a Memory 12', acryl on canvas, 36x54cm, 2009 - USD 100 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, ‘A Subtraction of a Memory 12′, acryl on canvas, 36x54cm, 2009 – USD 100 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, untitled, wood object, 60x105x31cm, 2013 - USD 400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, untitled, wood object, 60x105x31cm, 2013 – USD 400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

LOGO eye for art

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on October 22, 2014 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on October 22, 2014.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

 

 

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Elsewhere … in La Guyane Française: ‘Made in Surinam’

October 15, 2014 at 9:35 am (Elsewhere) (, , , , , , , , , , )

What: L.A.V.A.G. at L’Encadrier: Made in Surinam. Discover the works of Surinamese artists in an atmosphere of colors: Rinaldo Klas,  Kenneth Flijders, George Struikelblok, Wilgo VijfhovenSri Irodikromo, Reinier Asmoredjo and Dhiradj Ramsamoedj. All artists are core artists affiliated with Readytex Art Gallery.

When: October 17-November 22, 2014. Vernissage: October 17, 2014, 19:00 hrs. Opening hours: Wednesday and Thursday from 18:00-20:00 hrs, Friday and Saturday from 18:00-21:00 hrs. Saturday October 18, the day after the opening: from 10:00-13:00 hrs

Where: L.A.V.A.G. (L’Encadrier), 70, rue Léopold Heder, Cayenne, La Guyane Française

Poster

Poster

In 2010 Readytex Art Gallery and Galerie L’Encadrier in Cayenne, La Guyane Française, started a pleasant cooperation which would create wonderful opportunities for artists working with Readytex Art Gallery. Since then several partner artists of Readytex Art Gallery in Paramaribo have been invited yearly, to exhibit their work at Galerie L’Encadrier. Here a report from 2011, from DevSur.

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An Eye for Art: Kenneth Flijders – ‘Untitled I’

October 8, 2014 at 9:58 am (An Eye for Art) (, , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed an informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week he talks about ‘Untitled I’, mixed media on paper, 57 cm wide x 38 cm high, 2013, from Kenneth Flijders.

Kenneth Flijders, 'Untitled I', mixed media on paper, 57 cm wide x 38 cm high, 2013 - USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders, ‘Untitled I’, mixed media on paper, 57 cm wide x 38 cm high, 2013 – USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Many artists hesitate to give their work titles. I can well imagine so. A title can easily come across as an explanation or an illustration of the work. That takes all the fun out of it for the viewer. His curiosity is undermined and his creativity is lulled into sleep. The artist has already told him that which he wanted to find out by himself. That is indeed also the reason why many artists choose to give their work a very mysterious title. A title that offers endles possibilities. If that title then also has a beautiful or poetic sound to it, it even seems to improve the quality of the work.

For this work Kenneth Flijders (Paramaribo, 1956) chooses not to give a title. To emphasize that neutrality he has attached a number to it. He could hardly be any more businesslike. Still I think that this was a conscious and well thought out choice.

This work does not give much away. What am I actually looking at? What do I see? Nothing, and yet so much. Is it a creature? If that is so, then it must be an animal. A flat fish for example. That seems unlikely. It is a collection of lively shapes. Shapes that appear to be moving and are concentrated in the center into a strong core.  A crater. Not just the color red seems to confirm that strength, but certainly also the material that has been adhered to the left side. That gives the powerful center something seemingly against the grain. It contrasts with the transparently applied paint, yet at the same time, through its shape, it searches for a connection with the red surface.

Especially because of that adhered material – is it jute or perhaps palmtree fibre? – it is impossible to call this work a painting, a watercolor or a drawing. For the sake of convenience and to hide our ineptitude we describe these works as ‘mixed media’. A vague term which you can never be overly criticized for.

Important in a work of art is that it unsettles me, that it puts me on the wrong track. Flijders has done so by taking from me the possibility to ascribe it to any particular genre. He has done so by forcing me to think about the content, about what I see. That as a whole ‘Untitled I’ delivers a powerful image, is a not an insignificant detail.

 

TEXT Rob Perrée, Amsterdam, September, 2014

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Want to see this and other work of Kenneth Flijders ‘up close and personal’? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Kenneth Flijders please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/kennethflijders.

Print

 

More work by Kenneth Flijders available in Readytex Art Gallery:

Kenneth Flijders, 'Untitled 2', mixed media on paper, 50 cm wide x 42 cm high, 2013 - USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders, ‘Untitled 2′, mixed media on paper, 50 cm wide x 42 cm high, 2013 – USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

From a series of three: Kenneth Flijders, 'Every day a drop creates us 3', mixed media on paper, 100 cm wide x 80 cm high, 2013 - USD 350 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

From a series of three: Kenneth Flijders, ‘Every day a drop creates us 3′, mixed media on paper, 100 cm wide x 80 cm high, 2013 – USD 350 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders, 'Untitled V', screenprint, 63 cm wide x 46 cm high, 2010 - USD 225 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders, ‘Untitled V’, screenprint, 63 cm wide x 46 cm high, 2010 – USD 225 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders, 'Untitled 5', mixed media on paper, 27.5 cm wide x 34.5 cm high, 2012 - USD 200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders, ‘Untitled 5′, mixed media on paper, 27.5 cm wide x 34.5 cm high, 2012 – USD 200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders, 'Mamio I', acryl on canvas, 143 cm wide x 140 cm high, 2013 - USD 1200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders, ‘Mamio I’, acryl on canvas, 143 cm wide x 140 cm high, 2013 – USD 1200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders, 'I shall call you Adam', mixed media on hardboard, 55 cm wide x 125 cm high x 2.5 cm deep, 2011 - USD 750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders, ‘I shall call you Adam’, mixed media on hardboard, 55 cm wide x 125 cm high x 2.5 cm deep, 2011 – USD 750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders 'brokopondo' work was chosen as a design for one of the art wraps, a unique product from the Readytex Art Gallery, 180x100cm, 100% cotton / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders ‘Brokopondo’ work was chosen as a design for one of the art wraps, a unique product from the Readytex Art Gallery, 180x100cm, 100% cotton / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

LOGO eye for art

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on October 8, 2014 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on October 8, 2014.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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Elsewhere, in Amsterdam, the Netherlands: ‘Tekeningen op tafel’ [Drawings on the table]

October 1, 2014 at 9:07 pm (Elsewhere) (, , , , , , )

What: Tekeningen op tafel [Drawings on the table], a group exhibition with work by Neil Fortune, Paul Nassenstein, Tammo Schuringa a.o.

When: Opening: Friday October 3, 17:00-19:00 hrs, with a performance by Ina van den Heuvel. Saturday & Sunday October 4 & 5, 12:00-17:00 hrs 

Where: Buiksloterkerk,Buiksloterkerkpad 10, Amsterdam

tentoonstelling

Buiksloterkerk

Buiksloterkerk

An exhibition with 36 artists who present works on paper. Unframed or matted on tables. In order to protect the works, there is only a glass plate over the drawing. Straight from the workbench in the workshop to the presentation table in the church. This elementary and uniform method of presentation emphasizes the focused, intuitive and direct apects of the drawing process. The artists come from different disciplines and show a wide range of works on paper. They are also present to answer questions. Visitors can also, without the intervention of third parties, buy work. The prices of the drawings range from € 1 to € 1000 in consultation with the artist, a frame can be an additional charge.

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Call for Entries: New Dates for the 2014 Jamaica Biennial

September 30, 2014 at 1:24 pm (Uncategorized)

Originally posted on National Gallery of Jamaica Blog:

Patterson, Ebony - Bush Cockerels - small

Ebony G. Patterson – The Observation (Bush Cockerel) — A fictitious History, video installation (detail), National Biennial 2012

The National Gallery of Jamaica wishes to announce the new dates for the 2014 Jamaica Biennial.

The Jamaica Biennial, previously known as the National Biennial, is the National Gallery’s flagship biennial exhibition. Designed to encourage the development of art in Jamaica and its local and international exposure, the Biennial It includes work in all media and genres by a wide variety of artists who enter the exhibition through the jury system or by special invitation. The juried section is open to all artists resident in Jamaica and of immediate Jamaican descent, irrespective of residence. While thus mainly focused on the Jamaican and Jamaican Diaspora artists, the exhibition now also includes a select number of specially invited Caribbean and other international artists. As another new feature, there is also a call for…

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An Eye for Art: Paul Chang – ‘Blue Serenade′

September 24, 2014 at 9:04 am (An Eye for Art) (, , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed an informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week he talks about ‘Blue Serenade’, acrylics on canvas, 90 cm wide x 100 cm high, 2012, from Paul Chang.

Paul Chang, 'Blue Serenade', acrylic on canvas, 90x100cm, 2012 - USD 1400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Paul Chang, ‘Blue Serenade’, acrylic on canvas, 90x100cm, 2012 – USD 1400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

The work that Paul Chang made several years ago, still mostly held on to reality.  Sometimes it’s a big step for an artist to let go of that reality, and jump head first into the depth of abstraction. Although I cannot predict what he will be doing in the future, his works from 2012 and 2013 seem to have left reality behind them. The surroundings serve only to inspire the freedom of the loose, expressionistic style he employs to search for a composition that touches, that stimulates curiosity.

This painting, ‘Blue Serenade’, is a good example thereof.  Of course it depicts shapes that refer to reality – the flowery foreground, the ‘trunk’ in the center – but it is mostly a sophisticated exercise in the use of color. The bright light-blue background makes it appear as though the other shapes are moving around within the space. This is probably also because as a viewer, you tend to quickly associate blue with the sky. The background also makes the other colors stand out better. It makes the whole cheerful. As though the sun is shining down upon it.

A serenade is also a musical piece. In that regard the different shapes in this work are the springy notes on a stave. To whom the serenade is brought, is not that hard to find out. Given his other work, it is in the first place a serenade to the beauty of nature. That of Suriname and that of Florida, where Paul Chang has been living and working for over 25 years, but especially to nature in general. By abstracting the nature, he has lifted her to universal level.

This work reminds me, not in the last place, of the water lilies of Claude Monet (1915/1916). Those are admittedly closer to reality, but the colors, the style of painting and the composition could have influenced Paul Chang.

 

TEXT Rob Perrée, Paris, August 2014

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Want to see this and other work of Paul Chang ‘up close and personal’? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Paul Chang please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/paulchang.

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More work by Paul Chang available in Readytex Art Gallery:

Paul Chang, 'Sawgrass I', giclée on canvas, 38x40cm, 2013 - USD 250 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Paul Chang, ‘Sawgrass I’, giclée on canvas, 38x40cm, 2002 – USD 250 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Paul Chang, 'Blue Serenade', 2012

Paul Chang, ‘Savannah trees’, giclée on paper, 38x38cm, 2008 – USD 275 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Paul Chang, 'Blue Serenade', 2012

Paul Chang, ‘Savannah’, acryl on canvas, 76x90cm, 2011 – USD 900 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Paul Chang, 'Fish', acrylic on canvas, 76x90cm, 2013 - USD 900 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Paul Chang, ‘Fish’, acrylic on canvas, 76x90cm, 2012 – USD 900 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

LOGO eye for art

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on September 24, 2014 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on September 24, 2014.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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The Power of Art in Education

September 23, 2014 at 9:46 am (Interesting reads) (, , , , , , )

In 1943 Herbert Read turned the world of education upside down with his book Education Through Art. Art was for him an educational, formative process; and education an artistic process, a process of self-creation. Teachers view the process from on the outside, while artists view the process from on the inside. A complete human being emerges when both processes are integrated.

Making the library of children's home Saron child friendly / PHOTO Ada Korbee, 2014

Making the library of children’s home Saron child friendly / PHOTO Ada Korbee, 2014

Art possesses unique qualities which makes it an important catalyst in the learning process. Art is as such really vital to general education. Knowledge is better absorbed if the pupils are actively involved. Art makes pupils active; they look at/listen to art or make art themselves. It doesn’t matter what type of art. The words of Herbert Read, “Art leads the child out of itself’, speaks for itself.

Teachers and policy makers often actually know that art education is important for each individual, but don’t actually realize as yet how important the subject is. These lessons are mostly seen as ‘means of relaxation’ but not as  means of support. Surely not before tests and examinations, then these subjects must make way for hours in which to catch-up on the ‘important subjects’, while being correctly active with these subjects is no ‘lost time ’for the educative learning process but a ‘fat profit’.

Examples

I remember our teacher who gave Spanish lessons. She became almost desperate, because tests about applying adverbs were a catastrophe;  low scores rained continuously. One good day she said: “Everyone stand up, we are going to dance!” She walked up front rocking her hips and shaking her shoulders: “habia, habias, habia . . .”, with now and again a step to the left or the right and we had to follow. We were thereafter allowed to make up our own steps. We had great fun and had learned a lot. In the following test there were much fewer low scores and up to today I still dance when placing Spanish adverbs.

In 1996, while working as a practical teacher in handwork at a teachers’ training school, I once instructed student teachers to use the subject of a lesson for which a test had already be done as reason for a handwork lesson. A student teacher chose the subject ‘high and low Suriname’ from the geography lesson. The pupils had to portray this subject in clay. The class had a more than good score for this test, and as such the future teacher had very high expectations. The lesson really turned out different. The majority of the class didn’t understand where the hills should be placed. The aspirant teacher again had to explain the high and low Suriname lesson, using the map of Suriname. What was the case? The pupils had learned the contents of the lesson mentally, but had totally no imagination of what was high and low country.

On my advice, another  student teacher chose the subject ‘reptiles’ from the Nature Studies lesson because the test results were very poor. Understandably, this student teacher didn’t expect much from the lesson. She was really astonished when she saw that the pupils had formed various reptiles in clay within a very short space of time. Her amazement was even greater when the pupils easily named the body parts and the differences between the reptiles during discussions about the pieces of work, while they had earned a very low score for that test.

Expressive education and games

During a workshop which I recently conducted for teachers from the 3rd school year, I pointed to the importance of expressive education and games in the educational system. On that occasion the teachers themselves developed a board game in the shape of a worm and named their creation ‘the tone worm’. The ‘worm’ is curled and divided into little boxes, with a tone or a picture in each little box. The aim of this game is the stimulation of tone understanding. When they arrive at a tone the children must think of a word, and when they arrive at a picture they must name the word that fits. They must spell the words on both occasions. Who has the highest number and may start first, along with how many steps may be taken, is decided with the help of dice. This activity therefor also promotes the understanding of numbers by the child. Additionally this game stimulates the understanding of colors. The pawns that are needed to indicate at which place you are, have different colors. A maximum of four children can participate in the game. The game can also be played with two groups of pupils. Each group has one pawn and the children play in turns. In this game the children therefor also learn to play together, to learn together and orderly await their turn; social skills which they would need for the rest of their lives.

During the evaluation it turned out that the teachers found the workshop informative. They were then also very enthusiastic about the new insights which they have acquired. But shortly after this workshop I met an angry media center teacher who had helped to develop the game. Two happy-faced pupils from the 3rd school year were walking behind her carrying the 60x75cm board game as a trophy. “Mrs. Dragman, can you please keep the game in your possession, the children want to play with it all day and that is already beginning to irritate me. It is really annoying, because I cannot complete my program in this way. . .”.  I immediately thought about a verse from Loriz Malaguzzi’s poem ‘The hundred languages of children’: “The child has a hundred languages (and a hundred, hundred, hundred more) but they take away ninety nine. The school and the community separate the head from the body.” (See below for complete text.)

From isolation to integration

If expressive education is given correctly, the cognitive, socio-emotional, sensitive, motoric, affective and creative development of the child will be stimulated. It is therefore very important that this subject be not only presented as an isolated subject, but be also integrated in the other school subjects.

Motivation starts with a nice start, especially when laying the foundation. The learning of tones would be a bit easier if we presented that playfully and in a creative manner. The tones should be presented from simple to difficult. The letter “a” is a little circle with a little stick on the right. A “b” is a little circle with on the left a long stick going up. A “p” is a little circle with on the left a long stick going down. The pupils could better determine these letters because they are made-up of basic forms which are already known to them. This type of letters which have to be learnt also corresponds better with the type of letters in books. Children develop their own handwriting. It is therefore not very useful that we impose a manner of writing upon them at the beginning of their development which they often find to be very difficult. On top that we are now in the computer era, writing with the hand shall therefor gradually decrease.

ill kunst ENG

Writing / PHOTO Courtesy Carmen Dragman

Physical education is also for the lower primary school classes a very good instrument in the educational learning process. Assignments must be formulated in such a manner that the knowledge which the children have already experienced in the other lessons can be applied during the gym assignments. For example: the teacher draws two large circles with the short tone “a” and the long tone “aa”. He/she then names words and the children must listen carefully if they hear the “a” or the “aa” and run to the correct circle.

Creative day

Maybe it is in the beginning still difficult for the higher classes to present the lessons integrated every day. A solution could be that the lessons are presented in a creative manner on Friday. Pupils, teachers and student teachers should develop educational games during the school year and in an Education Fair organized at the end of the school year, must be allowed to exhibit their innovations.  In this way “Trust in our own abilities” shall also become visible in our education.

Drawing & writing / PHOTO Courtesy Carmen Dragman

Drawing & writing / PHOTO Courtesy Carmen Dragman

Making the library of children's home Saron child friendly / PHOTO Ada Korbee, 2014

Making the library of children’s home Saron child friendly / PHOTO Ada Korbee, 2014

Making the library of children's home Saron child friendly / PHOTO Ada Korbee, 2014

Making the library of children’s home Saron child friendly / PHOTO Ada Korbee, 2014

Making the library of children's home Saron child friendly / PHOTO Ada Korbee, 2014

Making the library of children’s home Saron child friendly / PHOTO Ada Korbee, 2014

Making the library of children's home Saron child friendly / PHOTO Ada Korbee, 2014

Making the library of children’s home Saron child friendly / PHOTO Ada Korbee, 2014

Making the library of children's home Saron child friendly / PHOTO Ada Korbee, 2014

Making the library of children’s home Saron child friendly / PHOTO Ada Korbee, 2014

 

TEXT Carmen Dragman

TRANSLATION David F. Michael

Carmen Dragman is originally a youth dental care worker. She thereafter did expressive art  (plastic space forming) at the AHKCO. In Amsterdam she obtained the 1e grade educational qualification in handwork and art history; and in Santo Domingo a master’s degree in preservation of monuments and cultural heritage. From 1995-2011 she has been a lecturer in expressive forming at the IOL. She is now researching the power of art and culture in education, especially on the young child. In 2013 she attended a 4 day workshop in the Loriz Malaguzzi Institute in Reggio Emilia. Her overseas vacations are to a large extent spent visiting art museums  and primary schools.

+++

The child
is made of one hundred.
The child has
A hundred languages
A hundred hands
A hundred thoughts
A hundred ways of thinking
Of playing, of speaking.
A hundred always a hundred
Ways of listening of marveling of loving
A hundred joys
For singing and understanding
A hundred worlds
To discover
A hundred worlds
To invent
A hundred worlds
To dream
The child has
A hundred languages
(and a hundred hundred hundred more)
But they steal ninety-nine.
The school and the culture
Separate the head from the body.
They tell the child;
To think without hands
To do without head
To listen and not to speak
To understand without joy
To love and to marvel
Only at Easter and Christmas
They tell the child:
To discover the world already there
And of the hundred
They steal ninety-nine.
They tell the child:
That work and play
Reality and fantasy
Science and imagination
Sky and earth
Reason and dream
Are things
That do not belong together
And thus they tell the child
That the hundred is not there
The child says: NO WAY the hundred is there–

 

TEXT Loris Malaguzzi, Founder of the Reggio Approach

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An Eye for Art: Hanka Wolterstorff – ‘Llama’

September 10, 2014 at 10:41 am (An Eye for Art) (, , , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed an informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week he talks about ‘Llama’, ceramics, 26 cm wide x 33 cm high x 25 cm deep, 2014, from Hanka Wolterstorff.

 

Hanka Wolterstorff, 'Llama', ceramics, 26wx33hx25d cm, 2014 - USD 200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, ‘Llama’, ceramics, 26wx33hx25d cm, 2014 – USD 200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

The European Ceramic Work Centre (also on Facebook) in ‘s Hertogenbosch exists for almost 25 years. Great artists such as Anish Kapoor, Tony Cragg, but also Dutch artists  such as Karin Arink (also on Facebook) and Thom Puckey had the opportunity to make ceramic art works there. Every year there are many artists who are ‘fighting’ for a place to work at the EKWC. It is a popular institute.

When Hanka Wolterstorff (Hoorn, 1943) started her career in ceramics, so much appreciation for ceramics was yet unheard of. Ceramics have had to live with the ‘vase trauma’ for a long time. Most people associated ceramics with vases, with decorative objects or with utilitarian objects. Art it could not be, let alone good art.

With her work Wolterstorff proves the absurdity of that idea. Her sculptures are abstract. They don’t want to portray anything, they don’t want to be useful, but they want to express something. Like movement for example. In this object she manages to create the suggestion of upward motion. As though the different segments are stretching themselves up. Because she uses lively colors, that sense of mobility is enhanced.

The colors are also there to reach a layeredness. They lie on top of and against each other. They run into and over one another. They also serve to seduce the viewer. You can hardly resist touching it.

Because it is ‘just’ made up of colorful, motile shapes, it is possible to imagine just about anything. Is the work a representation of nature, of the wind, of  rippling water, of plants that move in the wind or are budding? Or does it refer to cultural practices?

What is special, is that she succeeds in creating an illusion of weightlessness in her sculptures, while of course they are anything but.

Ceramics are a very old medium. It is also a medium that was used, and is used, all over the world. After all, the base material – clay – is easy to find almost everywhere. That is perhaps one of the reasons why for so long it was not considered ‘real’ art.

This work shows how striking it can be.

 

TEXT Rob Perrée, Paris, August 2014

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Want to see this and other work of Hanka Wolterstorff ‘up close and personal’? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Hanka Wolterstorff please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/hankawolterstorff.

Print

More work by Hanka Wolterstorff available in Readytex Art Gallery:

 

Hanka Wolterstorff, 'De golfslag van Coronie', ceramics, 60wx38hx32d cm, 2011 - USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, ‘De golfslag van Coronie’, ceramics, 60wx38hx32d cm, 2011 – USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, 'Speelbal van de natuur', ceramics, 40wx35hx30d cm, 2011 - USD 250 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, ‘Speelbal van de natuur’, ceramics, 40wx35hx30d cm, 2011 – USD 250 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, 'Vaas', ceramics, 28wx31hx18d cm, 2014 - USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, ‘Vaas’, ceramics, 28wx31hx18d cm,
2014 – USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, 'Untiltled I', ceramics, 2007 - USD 125 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, ‘Untiltled I’, ceramics, 2007 – USD 125 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

LOGO eye for art

The 19th edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on September10, 2014 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on September 10, 2014.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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An Eye for Art: John Lie A Fo – ‘Le Serpent bleu’

August 26, 2014 at 11:56 pm (An Eye for Art) (, , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed an informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week he talks about ‘Le Serpent Bleu’, screenprint (6/60), 70 cm wide x 49 cm high, 1990, from John Lie A Fo.

John Lie A Fo, ‘Le Serpent Bleu’, screenprint (6/60), 70x49cm, 2010 - USD 400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

John Lie A Fo, ‘Le Serpent Bleu’, screenprint (6/60), 70x49cm, 1990 – USD 400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

How much anger can you put into a relatively small screen print? John Lie A Fo (Paramaribo, 1945) has done a pretty good job of it. If looks could kill … If body language could swear … The work resembles a variation on the Adam-and-Eve story. Yet here the serpent has already put his diabolical seduction skills into practice. The woman confronts the man with this. A painful moment. Of course the story is more universal, and it is probably about the relationship between people in general, about what people do to each other.

The work of John Lie A Fo is basically figurative, but he distorts the reality with elemental, quasi-primitive forms. Those forms are often a visualization of feelings: the rounded body of the woman releases the anger, the angular man clenches his teeth and restrains himself. The colors are usually also elementary. Red, blue, black and light yellow. The bright colors enhance the contrasts and set the scene for the story. Moreover, anger knows no nuance, not even in color.

This work reminds me of paintings and drawings from Jean-Michel Basquiat. The angular male figure especially, could have walked straight out of one of his works. Basquiat also reduced his figures to more simple shapes. He used a similar flat manner to put them in the space, or rather onto the space, as though he didn’t know what perspective or depth are. Artists from the COBRA-movement are another source of inspiration for Lie A Fo: the colors, the motile, expressionistic shapes and the (supposedly) naive style.

John Lie A Fo was born in Suriname. He left the country after the December murders. He moved to French Guyana, but spends a lot of time in Europe.

His work is often engaged. Violence, and particularly violence directed towards a people, can evoke his anger. He calls his painting ‘Cri du Maroni’ his personal ‘Guernica’ (after Picasso’s political masterpiece).

John Lie A Foe, 'Le cri du Maroni', acryl on wood, 120x244cm, 1986  / PHOTO From publication 'John Lie A Fo; Messenger from the jungle'

John Lie A Foe, ‘Le cri du Maroni’, acryl on wood, 120x244cm, 1986 / PHOTO From publication ‘John Lie A Fo; Messenger from the jungle’

The culture of the interior of ‘the Guyanas’ and the Caribbean culture in general, encourage him to make reference to it in his work. Within that larger context, this ‘serpent’ is reasonably restrained.

TEXT Rob Perrée, Paris, August 2014

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Want to see this and other work of John Lie A Fo ‘up close and personal’? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about John Lie A Fo please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/johnlieafo.

Print

A book about John Lie A Fo is available at Readytex Art Gallery for EURO 45. John Lie A Fo; Retrospective 1982 > 2012, Anne-Marie Pichart-Libert & David Redon (red.), Galerie L’Encadrier, 2012. ISBN 978-2-9543281

Cover

Cover

 

More work by John Lie A Fo available in Readytex Art Gallery:

John Lie A Fo, ’Gsembe - matjoema', acryl on canvas, 100x120cm, 2008 - USD 3200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

John Lie A Fo, ’Gsembe – matjoema’, acryl on canvas, 100x120cm, 2008 – USD 3200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

John Lie A Fo, ‘Rite’, mixed media on paper, 88x68cm, 2008 - USD 1750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

John Lie A Fo, ‘Rite’, mixed media on paper, 88x68cm, 2008 – USD 1750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

John Lie A Fo, ‘Untitled I '97’, mixed media on paper, 100x70cm, 1997 - USD 1750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

John Lie A Fo, ‘Untitled I ’97’, mixed media on paper, 100x70cm, 1997 – USD 1750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

LOGO eye for art

The 18th edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on August 27, 2014 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on August 27, 2014.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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Coming up: Opening ‘On the Move’ – Stedelijk Museum, August 28

August 25, 2014 at 10:07 am (Coming up) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

What: Opening On The Move – Stories in contemporary photography and graphic design. (also on Facebook).

on the move

Participating: Samira Ben Laloua, Ernst van der Hoeven and Frank Bruggeman │Marc Roig Blesa and Rogier Delfos │Verena Blok │ Sara Blokland │Olivier van Breugel and Simone Mudde │Persijn Broersen and Margit Lukács │Sarah Carlier │ Elspeth Diederix │ Meike Eggers and Michael Anhalt │ Ringel Goslinga │ Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen │ Robert Knoth and Antoinette de Jong │ Thomas Kuijpers │ Kadir van Lohuizen │ Anaïs Lopez, Eva Smallegange and Linda Braber | Hans van der Meer │ Theo Niekus │ Gábor Õsz │ Rune Peitersen │ Ahmet Polat │ Johannes Schwartz │ Petra Stavast │ Anoek Steketee and Eefje Blankevoort │ Martine Stig │ Nadine Stijns │ Andrea Stultiens │ Elisabeth Tonnard │ Witho Worms and Hans Gremmen

When: Opening night: August 28, 2014, 19:30-22:00 hrs. Open: August 29, 2014-January 18, 2015

Where: Stedelijk Museum, Museumplein, Amsterdam

 

Sarah Carlier, The Lamb (video still), 2013 / PHOTO Courtesy Sarah Carlier en LhGWR gallery

Sarah Carlier, The Lamb (video still), 2013 / PHOTO Courtesy Sarah Carlier en LhGWR gallery

The Stedelijk Museum opens the cultural season on August 28 with On The Move – Stories in contemporary photography and graphic design. On the Move (also on Facebook) is the new edition of the Voorstellen tot Gemeentelijke Kunstaankopen [Proposals for Municipal Art Acquisitions].

Sign up for the festive opening musical program compiled by the ‘Night Mayor’ of Amsterdam Mirik Milan, with DJs HOMEWORK and Cinema Royale!

More information via www.nachtburgemeesteramsterdam.nl.

On the Move (also on Facebook) shows the variety of ways in which artists and photographers working today, in dialogue with graphic designers. For the exhibition 28 projects have been selected, varying from young filmmakers to established artists.

More information about the exhibition: http://bit.ly/on-themove

OPENING PROGRAM
(do not be late because full = full)
19:30 hrs: Welcome
20:00 hrs: Opening by councilor for culture Kajsa Ollongren, Karin van Gilst (business director Stedelijk Museum), and Caroline Glazenburg and Anne Ruygt (curators of the exhibition).
20:15 hrs: Exhibition opening to the public.
22.00 hrs: End

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