An Eye for Art: Dhiradj Ramsamoedj

April 9, 2014 at 8:54 am (An Eye for Art) (, , , , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed a new, informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This time the wooden sculpture, untitled, made from soemaroeba hardwood slats, 50 cm wide, 70 cm high, 40 cm deep, 2013, by Dhiradj Ramsamoedj.

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, untitled, hardwood, 50wx70hx40d cm, 2013 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, untitled, hardwood, 50wx70hx40d cm, 2013 – USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

The people in the work of Dhiradj Ramsamoedj (Paramaribo, 1986) are strange creatures.  In his paintings they scare you off with their large sculls and sagging faces.  He calls them ‘Ordinary People’, but adds to that the significant word ‘Reloaded’. He is apparently not much taken by them. They are too materialistic. He would prefer it if their brains would keep their longings and passions under control better. Is that the reason for the enlarged brain? Are they in need of being reloaded?

Aside from his drawings and paintings, Ramsamoedj also makes sculptural work. Striking amongst those are the ‘men’: constructed from boots and colorful pieces of cloth (‘The Flexible Man’) or from thin hardwood slats. The first are reminiscent of the ‘Sound Suits’ from the American Nick Cave. They also refer to a Shaman, or rather to a carnavalesque figure who ran away from a Mardi Gras parade.  Mobile, colorful, but without a face, without character. Flexible in literal and figurative sense, negative as well as positive. The wooden figures  - such as this untitled one from 2013 – also suggest mobility.  While in the case of ‘The Flexible Man’ there was some sort of packaging involved, this figure is empty. You can look right through him. He has no identity. He is a nameless abstraction.  It is only when light shines on it, that he makes a full shadow on the wall. He is no human, at best a shadow thereof.

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj has received his training at the Nola Hatterman Art Academy. His breakthrough came in 2010 during Paramaribo SPAN, the exchange exhibition between  Rotterdam and Suriname. In this he presented an installation in the home of his grandmother. Here his drawings, sculptures, objects (aluminum cups) and paintings (in a type of visual diaries), came together. An emotional whole, also because his grandmother walked through the rooms almost like some sort of performance artist.

I try to image myself,  with this wooden figure blown up to more than man-sized, in a new installation. A challenging thought.

TEXT Rob Perrée

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Want to take a closer, personal look at this work? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Dhiradj Ramsamoedj please visit the website www.readytexartgallery.com/dhiradjramsamoedj.

Print

More work byDhiradj Ramsamoedj:

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, untitled, hardwood, 60x105x31cm, 2013 - USD 400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, untitled, hardwood, 60x105x31cm, 2013 – USD 400
/ PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, 'You and me', oil on canvas, 150x110cm, 2010 - USD 800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, ‘You and me’, oil on canvas, 150x110cm, 2010 – USD 800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, 'A story of my own VI', acryl on canvas, 119x129cm, 2010 - USD 800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, ‘A story of my own VI’, acryl on canvas, 119x129cm, 2010 – USD 800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, untitled, oil on canvas, 58x65cm, 2008 - USD 225 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, untitled, oil on canvas, 58x65cm, 2008 – USD 225 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, 'Flexible Man' / PHOTO Roy Tjin, 2010

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, ‘Flexible Man’ / PHOTO Roy Tjin, 2010

Queen Beatrix with Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, looking at 'Mighty Man', Art Route Amsterdam / PHOTO J.W. Kaldenbach

Queen Beatrix with Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, looking at ‘Mighty Man’, Art Route Amsterdam / PHOTO J.W. Kaldenbach

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, 'Mighty Man' / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang, 2010

Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, ‘Mighty Man’ / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang, 2010

oog-voor-kunst-kleur-rgb

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on April 09, 2014 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on April 09, 2014.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

Permalink Leave a Comment

Thea Valk (1962-2014)

March 28, 2014 at 2:25 pm (Uncategorized) (, , )

Tuesday, March 25, many people in Suriname, especially in the field of art & culture, were shocked to hear of the sudden and unexpected death of Thea Valk. A mother, a daughter, a sister, a friend, owner of Falcon Advertising, cultural icon, painter, Rotarian: a very multifaceted and colorful woman.

Thea / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2010

Thea / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2010

It was at the end of January 2010. There was a big art event coming up: Paramaribo SPAN. On the occasion of its 145th anniversary, De Surinaamsche Bank N.V. offered its former directors residence, situated in the backyard of its head office in Paramaribo, Suriname, as a platform for 29 artists from Suriname and from the Netherlands, from February 27th to March 14th.  It would turn out to be a horizon broadening experience!

This was such an unprecedented large-scale event that in order to make it succeed, many people would have to work together. And that’s when I worked with Thea Valk closely and witnessed firsthand what a wonderful and truly unique person she was.

She always wore bright colors, fashionable clothes, and those heels … High as high heels gets! But what I found out was that she was there too, behind the scenes, in the middle of the night – or early morning, when people were busy working very hard to get the job done. She would be there, with a kind word, a helping hand, a hearty laugh!

When I think back, I can’t remember her complaining about anything, or anyone. Probably she did complain, but not ever in the open. She was very hands on, very positive, lifting the atmosphere. If there was something which was not to her liking she would be very decisive and pragmatic. The result was truly amazing.

Also, she could share. When we were preparing a guest list for this event and I suggested that we would combine our address lists, she didn’t hesitate even one second. That seems such a simple gesture, but that was an unprecedented gesture too. To me it showed that she had that magic trait, to make more than the sum of separate parts.

The photographs were taken during our preparation visit of the Paramaribo SPAN site. I think back and smile when I think of Thea. You will be missed girl!

Morea, Thea, Henna, Meredith, Ada, Ann, Chandra / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2010

Morea, Thea, Henna, Meredith, Ada, Ann, Chandra / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2010

Ann and Thea laughing / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2010

Ann and Thea laughing / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2010

Exploring possibilities: shoot for the moon / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2010

Exploring possibilities: shoot for the moon / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2010

TEXT Marieke Visser, March 2014

Permalink 2 Comments

Group exhibition ‘WAT – Working Apart Together’, at De Hal

March 28, 2014 at 1:31 pm (Exposed) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

The first vernissage of Readytex Art Gallery in 2014 just opened its doors. Starting from March the 26th, the public could enjoy the group exhibition WAT – Working Apart Together. In De Hal at de Grote Combéweg 45, where 14 artists present their most recent works of art. Though the artists each work independently, their works still contain a surprising amount of elements, turning this into a cohesive presentation. For visitors the exhibition WAT offers the exiting challenge to discover that cohesiveness and perhaps even identify it.

Banner

Banner

After the positive reactions of the public to the group exhibitions of the past two years, Readytex Art Gallery decided to work according to that same concept  for 2014. This year, instead of two large exhibitions with each time new artworks of just one artist, the gallery will organize two large exhibitions with new works of art by multiple artists. It is a concept that works quite well for the artists, the gallery and for the public as well.

Kurt Nahar and two RAG Team members in front of his installation / PHOTO Ada Korbee, 2014

Kurt Nahar and two RAG Team members in front of his installation / PHOTO Ada Korbee, 2014

Visitors admiring Sri's work / PHOTO Ada Korbee, 2014

Visitors admiring Sri’s work / PHOTO Ada Korbee, 2014

Opening Night / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang, 2014

Opening Night / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang, 2014

The exhibition WAT offers new work by the following artists affiliated to the gallery: Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, George Struikelblok, Hanka Wolterstorff, Kenneth Flijders, Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, Kurt Nahar, Reinier Asmoredjo, René Tosari, Rinaldo Klas, Roddney Tjon Poen Gie, Soeki Irodikromo, Sri Irodikromo, Sunil Puljhun and Wilgo Vijfhoven.

The exhibition provides the public with impulses other than those of a solo exhibition. In WAT Readytex Art Gallery presents a variety of art works: paintings, batik, and sculptures from wood and ceramics. Viewers can also enjoy a diversity of styles. Kurt Nahar for example, presents a selection that was inspired by his recent participation in the ‘Bienal de Pintura Mural Internos‘ in Cuba. In his new art Sunil Puljhun returns  to abstraction and color, contrary to the black and white works he’d been previously immersed in. Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi works from a renewed focus: she researches the Surinamese biodiversity, concentrating especially on bird species. Wilgo Vijfhoven shows transitions in his work and uses a somewhat different visual imagery. Dhiradj Ramsamoedj presents research on canvas, which provides insights into a project that he will soon develop into a series of outdoor, public sculptures.  George Struikelblok gives an exciting new twist to his work and with that offers a glimpse into what is to come at a larger presentation next year.

Readytex Art Gallery and her partner artists invite the public to visit the exhibition WAT – Working Apart Together.  Everyone is welcome in De Hal from Wednesday the 26th until Sunday the 30th of March from 19:00 – 21:00 hrs.

Banner

Banner

TEXT / TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

 

Permalink Leave a Comment

An Eye for Art: Soeka

March 27, 2014 at 5:01 pm (An Eye for Art) (, , , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed a new, informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This time he discusses the work ‘Een trio indiaan met fluit’ [A Trio Amerindian with flute], mixed media on canvas, 78 cm wide x 136 cm high, 2010, by Soeka.

Soeka, Een trio indiaan op fluit [A Trio Amerindian on flute], 2010 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Soeka, Een trio indiaan met fluit [A Trio Amerindian with flute], mixed media on canvas, 78x136cm, 2010, / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

He names the work simply ‘Een Trio indiaan met fluit’ [A Trio Indian with flute] (2010). As if he wants to say: that is what it is, nothing more. That is typical for Henry Soekarman Kartotaroeno, in short Soeka (1957). An artist who is not hindered by any pretentions. Yet his paintings, drawings and gouaches are more than just reproductions of reality.

Soeka is a self taught artist. He was enrolled at the Nola Hatterman Institute for a short while, but has for the most part developed himself. His skill is, in the good sense of the word, old-fashioned. You don’t see much of this anymore. He has no problems whatsoever to depict the human figure, in whatever position. But he does more. The Indian in this work is a man who is visibly absorbed in that which he is doing, for one moment forgetting his surroundings to ensure that his music sounds good. Soeka has succeeded in portraying his inner reality.

I also suspect a hidden reality. The Indigenous form a small minority in Suriname. So small that they hardly count. The Trio-Indians are again a minority thereof. The painting of an Indigenous man is therefore a statement. I dare to say this, because the Indian in this work has been given a striking background. It could be that this is a natural background, somewhat abstracted, but I also see this background as a decoration. As a decoration of the man, a tribute to the Indian. That interpretation adds an extra charge to the work, additional proof that Soeka has more to offer than a skillful representation of reality.

This series of works is done primarily in black and white. One contrasting color – pale pink or pale blue –, he does not seem to need much more to bring his models to the forefront and make them have an impact. The dimensions also contribute to this. ‘Een Trio indiaan met fluit’ is a large work (78 x 136 cm). The limited reality of this blog post cannot handle these proportions. How unfortunate.

TEXT Rob Perrée

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Want to take a closer, personal look at this work? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Soeka please visit the website www.readytexartgallery.com/soeka.

Print

More work bySoeka:

Soeka, 'Vrouw / paloeloe' [Woman / Flower], mixed media on canvas, 95x70cm, 2010, USD 450/ PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Soeka, ‘Vrouw / paloeloe’ [Woman / Flower], mixed media on canvas, 95x70cm, 2010, USD 450/ PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Soeka, 'Kotomisie II', oil on canvas, 67x83cm, 2008, USD 400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Soeka, ‘Kotomisie II’, oil on canvas, 67x83cm, 2008, USD 400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Soeka, 'Djamoe', conté on paper, 40x30cm, 2007, USD 100 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Soeka, ‘Djamoe’, conté on paper, 40x30cm, 2007, USD 100 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on March 26, 2014 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on March 26, 2014.

oog-voor-kunst-kleur-rgb

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

Permalink Leave a Comment

An Eye for Art: Sunil Puljhun

March 12, 2014 at 11:27 am (An Eye for Art) (, , , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed a new, informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This time he discusses the work ‘The Dancer’, mixed media on paper, 55 cm wide x 75 cm high, 2011, by Sunil Puljhun.

Oog voor kunst 6 Sunil Puljhun

Sunil Puljhun, ‘The Dancer’, mixed media on paper, 55x75cm, 2011 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

In 2011, Sunil Puljhun (Paramaribo, 1978) creates a series of works which remind me, from some distance, of tattered black and white photographs. Towards the bottom they seem to have given up.

When I take a better look, I discover that they are paintings after all. Not average paintings,  because occasionally charcoal, sand and glued on elements supplement the acrylic paint, literally giving them depth.

And with regards to content, Puljhun also throws me off.  Through the sophisticated use of black and white – shadow and light – and by giving the figures a high silhouette appearance, they radiate a seductive beauty. The scarcely applied colors strengthen that image. A second look offers more insight to this as well. Hidden behind the deceptive beauty, lies a dark world in which pain, fear and sadness dominate. The beautiful figures are threatened. The deep black appears to be a symbol of gloom and death.  ‘The Dancer’ is not an elegant young man making beautiful jumps, but a man who is pursued by life threatening flames.  The titles of other works – ‘Run for your Life’ and ‘Slavery’ – even more clearly  point towards similar interpretation.

Also in stock: Sunil Puljhun, 'Slavery', mixed media on paper, 74x102cm, 2011 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Also in stock: Sunil Puljhun, ‘Slavery’, mixed media on paper, 74x102cm, 2011 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Oog voor kunst 6 Sunil Puljhun Slavery

That the paintings of Puljhun remind me of photographs, is also due to the fact  that the artist uses photos as a source. I know that he’s been experimenting with existing images which he finds on the internet, since 2011. With Photoshop or some other photo editing program he distorts these images, so that not only do they become his, but they also incorporate his emotions. A logical and interesting experiment of which I hope to one day see the results. Sunil Puljhun was once an artist who in his work seemed to only bring tribute to beauty.  ‘The Dancer’ shows that he is capable of providing beauty with poignant content.

TEXT Rob Perrée

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Want to take a closer, personal look at this work? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Sunil Puljhun please visit the website www.readytexartgallery.com/sunilpuljhun.

Print

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on March 12, 2014 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on March 12, 2014.

oog-voor-kunst-kleur-rgb

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

Permalink Leave a Comment

Elsewhere … in Curacao – ‘Exploring the Past to Envisage the Future’

March 9, 2014 at 10:10 pm (Elsewhere) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Within the framework of the commemoration of the abolition of 150 years of slavery, several exhibitions will take place in the first half of this year in Curacao, under the auspices of Foundation Arte ’99. The aim of these exhibitions is to give visual artists the possibility to express and visualize their concepts and ideas on this theme. The organizers aim to create moments of reflection through the visual arts. A constructive dialogue and interchange with the public is also being stimulated for everyone to reflect on this theme that has played and still plays an important role in the national, post colonial consciousness of the island population.

Several successful exhibitions already took place in 2013 in a selection of galleries and museums within this same framework. Landhuis Bloemhof (Facebook), the Maritiem Museum (Facebook), Kas di Kultura, the National Archaeological – Anthropological Memory Management (NAAM) and Pietermaai hosted several exhibits that lit the theme in their own way. This year the Museo di Kòrsou (Curaçao Museum), Gallery Alma Blou, Mon Art Gallery (Facebook) and once again Landhuis Bloemhof (Facebook) will follow.

Opening night / PHOTO Rene Bergsma

Opening night / PHOTO Rene Bergsma

The kick-off for the series of exhibitions was held at the Museo di Kòrsou (Curaçao Museum) where on February 14, 2014, the opening took place of the exhibition Exploring the Past to Envisage the Future. It can be visited until May 14, 2014.

Curator is Curacaon art historian Jennifer Smit. She chose to let the general public be introduced to the work of promising young artists as well as the artistic creations of more renowned and internationally acclaimed artists. All ten participating artists are local and work and live in Curacao.

Opening night / PHOTO Rene Bergsma

Opening night / PHOTO Rene Bergsma

Some of the art works were especially made for this exhibition. Others were inspired by the NAAM collection. Existing works of art were also chosen that depict the theme of slavery. This exhibition will include a variety of media such as: photography, sculptures, painting, drawings, assemblages, installations and multimedia work.

A glimpse of the installation by Ailsa Anastatia

A glimpse of the installation by Ailsa Anastatia

Ailsa Anastatia, installation representing Curacao's foundation / Courtesy Facebookpage 1000 Awesome Things About Curacao

Ailsa Anastatia, installation representing Curacao’s foundation / Courtesy Facebookpage 1000 Awesome Things About Curacao

Herman van Bergen, 'Harvest'

Herman van Bergen, ‘Harvest’
Tirzo Martha / PHOTO Rene Bergsma

Tirzo Martha / PHOTO Rene Bergsma

The participating artists are Tirzo Martha, Felix de Rooy, Tony Monsanto, Avantia Damberg, Ailsa Anastatia, Ivanah Suares, Philip Rademaker, Yubi Kirindongo, Herman van Bergen and Omar Kuwas.

Curator Smit calls it a ‘cutting edge’ selection. The artists show work within their own discipline, which brings forth the theme in a surprising, exciting and unconventional way. According to Smit, these works will encourage reflection and above all a constructive dialogue about the intense theme of slavery.

This exhibition is made possible by financial aid of: Mondriaan Fonds, Maduro & Curiel’s Bank, MCIS, Coca-Cola, Spigt Dutch Caribbean, CUROM Broadcasting (Z86) and Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds Caribisch Gebied.

Avantia Damberg / PHOTO Courtesy artist

Avantia Damberg / PHOTO Courtesy artist

This art project is being organized under the auspices of Foundation Arte ’99The art exhibitions will run a year long from July 2013 to July 2014. On this page you will find all information and updates on these cultural events. 

Read ARC Magazine‘s article about the exhibition.

On the website of Curacao Art a post about the exhibition.

Anf more (p)reviews:

A preview in 'Antilliaans Dagblad', February 8, 2014

A preview in ‘Antilliaans Dagblad’, February 8, 2014

A review in 'Antilliaans Dagblad', February 17, 2014

A review in ‘Antilliaans Dagblad’, February 17, 2014
A review in 'Amigoe', February 18, 2014

A review in ‘Amigoe’, February 18, 2014

An ‘in memoriam’ for Tony Monsanto.

An 'in memoriam' for Tony Monsanto

An ‘in memoriam’ for Tony Monsanto

Permalink Leave a Comment

Egbert Lieveld (Berg en Dal, Para District, January 10, 1919-Paramaribo, March 2014)

March 8, 2014 at 3:47 pm (Headlines) (, , , )

Egbert Lieveld (Berg en Dal, Para District, January 10, 1919-Paramaribo, March 2014) , visual artist, honorary FVAS-member, started painting as a pastime in 1980. He became a very productive painter, popular with his colleagues and the audience, also because of his amiable nature.

Egbert Lieveld, 'Cultuurtuinlaan LVV [Cultuurtuinlaan LVV], mixed media on canvas, 54x60cm, 1986 / PHOTO Roy Tjin, 2007

Egbert Lieveld, ‘Cultuurtuinlaan LVV’ [Cultuurtuinlaan LVV], mixed media on canvas, 54x60cm, 1986 (Collection: Centrale Bank van Suriname) / PHOTO Roy Tjin, 2007

“For as long I as remember I have been painting. Even while I was still in my mother’s womb! It is part of me; it was a gift from heaven.” It is a typical element of Egbert Lieveld’s painting technique that he often combines paint with other materials, thus creating a hint of three-dimensionality in his work. “I am by profession a designer and builder of structures, not an artist. My method of painting is based on the way one builds a house, using roofing, wood and sand.”

Egbert Lieveld, Schoeners te Coronie [Schooners at Coronie], oil on canvas, 66x97cm, 1985 (EBS Collection) / FOTO  Cliff San A Jong/Roy Tjin/Lucien Chin A Foeng, 2000

Egbert Lieveld, ‘Schoeners te Coronie’ [Schooners at Coronie], oil on canvas, 66x97cm, 1985 (EBS Collection) / PHOTO Cliff San A Jong/Roy Tjin/Lucien Chin A Foeng, 2000

Egbert Lieveld, 'Zoetwaterkanaal te Totness'  [Fresh Water Canal in Totness], oil on canvas, 64x95cm, 1985 (Collection: Centrale Bank van Suriname) / PHOTO Roy Tjin, 2007

Egbert Lieveld, ‘Zoetwaterkanaal te Totness’ [Fresh Water Canal in Totness], oil on canvas, 64x95cm, 1985 (Collection: Centrale Bank van Suriname) / PHOTO Roy Tjin, 2007

The Coronie District is prominent in Egbert Lieveld’s work. That special bond dates from 1946 when he spent some months in the coastal district as a surveyor employed by the Ministry of Public Works. The special atmosphere of the district appealed to him right from the start and even after many decades it is still almost tangible. “I often paint from nature. I observe my surroundings, and then after a while I start painting. It is just as when you’ve taken a photograph; only when it is printed can you see the final result. But all along you had captured the image in your mind.” Sometimes it takes years before such an image actually becomes a painting; according to the painter that is because it must ripen. “Once it’s ripe I bring it out into the open. My secret is: I never start painting without saying a prayer first. And then I find the inspiration for my hands to create.”

© TEXT Marieke Visser, from: Talent. Uit de kunstcollectie van de Centrale Bank van Suriname, Paramaribo (Centrale Bank van Suriname) 2007. © English translation: Anne-Marie Reeder

Egbert Lieveld, De Hindostaan [The Hindustani], oil on canvas, 1980 (EBS Collection) / FOTO  Cliff San A Jong/Roy Tjin/Lucien Chin A Foeng, 2000

Egbert Lieveld, ‘De Hindostaan’ [The Hindustani], oil on canvas, 77x90cm, 1980 (EBS Collection) / PHOTO Cliff San A Jong/Roy Tjin/Lucien Chin A Foeng, 2000

Egbert Lieveld, 'De Surinaamsche Bank in 1934', collage on board with acrylic, 123.5x99cm, 1994 (De Surinaamsche Bank N.V. Collection) / PHOTO Roy Tjin, 2005

Egbert Lieveld, ‘De Surinaamsche Bank in 1934′, collage on board with acrylic, 123.5x99cm, 1994 (De Surinaamsche Bank N.V. Collection) / PHOTO Roy Tjin, 2005

From an interview I had with Egbert Lieveld:
“Ma’am, I went to the Louvres and I wanted just one thing: I had to see the Mona Lisa. So I went over there and there she was. It is a small painting.”

He indicated with his hands, indeed much smaller than you expect.

“So, finally, I am alone with her, and there I stand. I said: So, you’re the famous Mona Lisa ma’am. And she said, Yes, Mr. Lieveld, yes. And I ask her what is so special about her. She tells me: Look, and tell me what you see. You laugh, I say. And she nods, she says: That’s right, so you have to go to meet people with a smile. But, what more do you see? And I say. I do not know. She tells me to look to the left. I look to the left, and she still looks at me. I say: You still look at me, your eyes follow me. And she says: And then, what more do you see ? I say: You’re dressed. A woman is always beautiful as she is dressed. “

TEXT Marieke Visser, 2007

Egbert Lieveld, 'Woningnood' [Housing shortage], acryl on board, 80x60.5cm, 1991 (De Surinaamsche Bank N.V. Collection) / PHOTO Roy Tjin, 2005

Egbert Lieveld, ‘Woningnood’ [Housing shortage], acryl on board, 80×60.5cm, 1991 (De Surinaamsche Bank N.V. Collection) / PHOTO Roy Tjin, 2005

Egbert Lieveld, 'Lantidan' [Lantidan], acryl on board, 80x60.5cm, 1991 (De Surinaamsche Bank N.V. Collection) / PHOTO Roy Tjin, 2005

Egbert Lieveld, ‘Lantidan’ [Lantidan], acryl on board, 80×60.5cm, 1991 (De Surinaamsche Bank N.V. Collection) / PHOTO Roy Tjin, 2005

Permalink Leave a Comment

An Eye for Art: Kurt Nahar, ‘War Monument 8’

February 26, 2014 at 8:53 am (An Eye for Art) (, , , , , , , , , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed a new, informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This time he discusses the collage ‘War Monument 8’, collage on paper, 40 cm wide x 30 cm high, 2011, by Kurt Nahar.

Kurt Nahar, War Monument 8’, collage on paper, 40 cm wide x 30 cm high, 2011 | PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, War Monument 8’, collage on paper, 40 cm wide x 30 cm high, 2011 | PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar (1972) is not an artist who aims to please, nor does he try to seduce his audience with beauty. He has a mission. In fact, with his work he wants awaken the viewer and he does this by paying attention to themes many would rather avoid talking about. The December murders for example. This may not make him popular, but it does earn him respect. It takes guts to express your opinion in a small community.  

He opts for wide variety of forms of expression: installation, drawing, painting, collage and poetry. The latter is less surprising than it may seem. Words, texts: they appear in many of his works. Sometimes as a visual element, often as a suggestive exclamation.

In this work – ‘War Monument 8’ from 2011 – he illustrates the madness and cruelty of war and violence by juxtaposing vulnerability and liveliness versus power and death. That sculls rest on and in a red field is no coincidence, nor is it that he portrays vulnerability with a ballet-like young girl. He may not choose aesthetic images, but in this piece he does show that he has a good sense of imagery.  It is a war memorial with a powerful presence, an image that will stay with you always.

In much of his work Nahar refers to DADA, an art movement from the 1910s and 1920s, which was characterized by engagement, provoking controversial debate and ignoring the prevailing codes and art laws. His collages and photo-montages are certainly influenced by artists such as Raoul Hausmann and Hanna Höch, but also by Rodchenko and Lissitzky. His texts remind me more of those by Walter Mehring and Paul van Ostaijen. Through that broad frame of reference he takes his local mission to an international level.

TEXT Rob Perrée, January 2014

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Want to take a closer, personal look at this work? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Kurt Nahar please visit the website www.readytexartgallery.com/kurtnahar.

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on February 26, 2014 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on February 26, 2014.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

Permalink Leave a Comment

Outspoken – René Tosari: an Artist on the Move

February 24, 2014 at 12:57 pm (Outspoken) (, , , , , , , )

For the last few years visual artist René Tosari (Meerzorg, 1948) has lived and worked in the Netherlands, in Amsterdam-Zuidoost. However, he never lost contact with Suriname, and every other year he would spend several months here. To exhibit and to work. And since May 2013, he is back for good.  Back in Meerzorg, where he was born.

René Tosari | PHOTO Sranan Art Xposed/Marieke Visser, 2013

René Tosari | PHOTO Sranan Art Xposed/Marieke Visser, 2013

2014 will be an exciting year for Tosari. In the first half of the year he will hold a new exhibition. Furthermore, going on behind the scenes, are the work and preparations for a book about this passionate artist.  A monograph in which every aspect of his artistry will be included. The writers team working on this book: Chandra van Binnendijk, Rob Perrée, Priscilla Tosari and Marieke Visser.

The move back to Suriname, for good,  has kept him quite busy: he is only now returning to his painting. ‘I was itching to get started again! If you haven’t worked for a month, you need three months to make up for it.’ The first new canvases are already laid out,  he is working on a series of small paintings with childhood memories. A larger painting that he is working on also catches the attention.

René Tosari, untitled, 2012 | PHOTO Sranan Art Xposed/Marieke Visser

René Tosari, untitled, 2012 | PHOTO Sranan Art Xposed/Marieke Visser

The first steps on his path towards becoming an artist were made when in 1967, he starts taking lessons at the Nationaal Instituut voor Kunst & Kultuur [National Institute for Art and Culture] (NIKK). In 1970 Tosari continues his studies in the Netherlands, at the Academie Beeldende Kunsten [Visual Arts Academy] in Rotterdam. In the first decade of his artistry René Tosari‘s work is for the most part very engaged,  consisting of a lot of graphic prints. Etchings, linocuts, screen prints. Themes that come up in the 70′s and 80′s are among others: the war in Vietnam, the rights of the working class,  Anton de Kom, the importance of agriculture, production.

René Tosari, untitled | PHOTO Sranan Art Xposed/Marieke Visser

René Tosari, untitled | PHOTO Sranan Art Xposed/Marieke Visser

Throughout the years Tosari’s work has become more personal, although his great social involvement remains. ‘That I now focus more on myself, has given me more freedom. But even though I feel as if I work freely, you are naturally constantly confronted with current issues. You either have that type of engagement or you don’t.’ In a fairly recent  painting we see someone who is looking through binoculars, and the lenses reflect that which is observed.  In it are boat refugees, caught on canvas, months before the shipwrecks took place at Lampedusa.

René Tosari, untitled, 2012 | PHOTO Sranan Art Xposed/Marieke Visser

René Tosari, untitled, 2012 | PHOTO Sranan Art Xposed/Marieke Visser

Occasionally he is called a nomad. As long as he can remember, he is on his way: on the move. He is at home in both worlds; in the Netherlands as well as in Suriname he seems to effortlessly find his way. Without hesitation he picks up the thread on both sides of the ocean. ‘When I was in the Netherlands I stayed in constant contact with Suriname. For me it was essential not to become estranged from my own roots.’ He does notice a difference in the work that he makes in the two worlds.  ‘In Suriname you are immediately busy with actualities, you are confronted by them. That is different in the Netherlands, because there you symbolize more. In the work that has taken shape there, you see more static figures, while the paintings made here are more alive, there is more action.  Your perception, your involvement, is different in both countries.’

René Tosari, untitled | PHOTO Courtesy René Tosari

René Tosari, untitled | PHOTO Courtesy René Tosari

For Tosari it is important that his art has depth to it. ‘I am happy if the viewer can taste what I want to convey.’

René Tosari, untitled (From 'Dichtbij de oorsprong') | PHOTO Sranan Art Xposed/Marieke Visser

René Tosari, untitled (From ‘Dichtbij de oorsprong’) | PHOTO Sranan Art Xposed/Marieke Visser

In Suriname René Tosari is represented by Readytex Art Gallery (Facebook), Maagdenstraat 44-48, Paramaribo. The last large solo exhibition in Suriname was Dichtbij de oorsprong [close to the origins] in cooperation with Readytex Art Gallery, in De Hal, in 2010. His webpage: http://readytexartgallery.com/renetosari/.

René Tosari, untitled | PHOTO Sranan Art Xposed/Marieke Visser

René Tosari, untitled | PHOTO Sranan Art Xposed/Marieke Visser

René Tosari, untitled (from 'De Nieuwe Oogst') | PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, untitled (from ‘De Nieuwe Oogst’) | PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, untitled (from 'De Nieuwe Oogst') | PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, untitled (from ‘De Nieuwe Oogst’) | PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, untitled | PHOTO Courtesy René Tosari

René Tosari, untitled | PHOTO Courtesy René Tosari

TEXT Marieke Visser

Marieke Visser (Bennekom, the Netherlands, 1962) studied journalism and language and literature in the Netherlands. As publicist she writes a lot about art, culture, history and tourism from her own news agency Swamp Fish Press. Three large art projects to which she has recently contributed are: Wakaman Drawing lines, connecting dotsParamaribo SPAN and  Kibii Wi Koni Marcel Pinas The Event. She is currently editor in chief of Sranan Art Xposed.

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld

This article was previously published, in Dutch, in the quarterly EFM Magazine, nr. 7, January 2014. Subscripe to the free EFM newsmailing here. Sranan Art Xposed is in collaborates with EFM Magazine on the art & culture content.

dec_2013_cover

Permalink Leave a Comment

Workshops Atelier 1059, Lelydorp, Suriname

February 22, 2014 at 4:55 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , )

Atelier 1059 is a place at the Indira Gandhiweg 1059, in Lelydorp, Suriname, which aims to support artistic, social and cultural development for the people Suriname.

On the program for the months February, March and April 2014 there are three workshops: drawing & painting (by Ellen van Beeck), working with clay (by Leonnie van Eert) and basketry (mats and baskets) (by Louise Wakiran).

New Picture

 

There are three different workshops on the program during the months February, March and April 2014.

February 23 – Drawing and painting (theme: light and dark), Ellen van Beeck

Time: 09:00-14:00 / SRD 75 (material, drinks and lunch included)

March 9 – Basketry, Louise Wakiran

Time: 09:00-14:00 / SRD 75 (material, drinks and lunch included)

March 16 – Drawing and Painting (theme: light and dark), Ellen van Beeck

Time: 09:00-14:00 / SRD 75 (material, drinks and lunch included)

March 23 – Working with clay, Leonnie van Eert

Time: 09:00-14:00 / SRD 75 (material, drinks and lunch included)

April 6 – Basketry, Louise Wakiran

Time: 09:00-14:00 / SRD 75 (material, drinks and lunch included)

New Picture

If you are interested, please send Ellen van Beeck an email at ellenvanbeeck @ hotmail.com (leave out the blank spaces before and after @).

Indira Gandhiweg 1049, Lelydorp from Paramaribo, please take the PL bus and then a taxi, our take the PO bus and stop at Palisadeweg.

 

Permalink 1 Comment

Next page »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 387 other followers

%d bloggers like this: