An Eye for Art: Wilgo Vijfhoven – ‘Sfeer III′

July 16, 2014 at 11:14 am (An Eye for Art) (, , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed a new, informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week ‘Sfeer III’, mixed media on canvas, 71 cm wide x 101 cm high, 2009, by Wilgo Vijfhoven.

Wilgo Vijfhoven, ‘Sfeer III’, mixed media on canvas, 71 cm wide x 101 cm high, 2009 - USD 650 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Wilgo Vijfhoven, ‘Sfeer III’, mixed media on canvas, 71 cm wide x 101 cm high, 2009 – USD 650 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Most of the time the canvases of   Wilgo Vijfhoven (Paramaribo, 1964) are occupied by female figures. Or should I say: claimed by? Figuratively,  but depicted in a haze, in colors that transition from yellow, to orange, to red. That haze represents the mystery that surrounds women. The admiration, it seems, is in the greedy way in which he often puts the woman onto his canvas in paint. This suggests that the physical aspect is of great importance. But he deniesthat. His admiration stems mainly from the way in which women deal with stress and from how they manage to stay strong when they are abandoned for example. The strong woman, more than the beautiful woman.

This work – ‘Sfeer III’ from 2009 – is different in more than one way and thus special. It has no subject, but wants only to express an atmosphere. A poetic atmosphere, allowing space for a personal story and personal interpretation.

The familiar colors have made way for cooler variations. Although Vijfhoven may still have used paint – watercolor and no longer oil – this work is for the most part a collage. On top of a transparent layer of paint, he has glued pieces of paper. From various sources. Sometimes crumpled or creased, sometimes a bit neater, but never tidy. Those pieces of paper loose a great deal of their identity due to the layers of paint that have been painted over them. Result: a fan-like composition, but at the same time a powerful image despite the fragile and everyday materials from which it is constructed. A work that shares the mysterious quality of his paintings, but that emphatically refuses to have any content. It is not exaggerated to call it a visual definition of ‘atmosphere’.

After the Nola Hatterman Art Academy  Wilgo Vijfhoven continued his studies at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts in Jamaica. There he learned that you have more options as an artist, when you let go of realism and exchange the local for the universal.

This work is most convincing proof thereof.

 

TEXT Rob Perrée, Amsterdam, July 2014

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Want to see this and other work of Wilgo Vijfhoven ‘up close and personal’? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Wilgo Vijfhoven please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/wilgovijfhoven.

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More work by Wilgo Vijfhoven available in Readytex Art Gallery:

Wilgo Vijfhoven, 'Model’, acrylic on canvas, 73 cm wide x 109 cm high, 2009 - USD 750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Wilgo Vijfhoven, ‘Model’, acrylic on canvas, 73 cm wide x 109 cm high, 2009 – USD 750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Wilgo Vijfhoven, ‘Swinging Beauty’, acrylic on canvas, 80 cm wide x 100 cm high, 2012 - USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Wilgo Vijfhoven, ‘Swinging Beauty’, acrylic on canvas, 80 cm wide x 100 cm high, 2012 – USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Wilgo Vijfhoven, ‘Kotomisi’, acrylic on canvas, 60 cm wide x 130 cm high, 2010 - USD 675 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Wilgo Vijfhoven, ‘Kotomisi’, acrylic on canvas, 60 cm wide x 130 cm high, 2010 – USD 675 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

 

LOGO eye for art

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on July 16, 2014 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on July 16, 2014.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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Exhibition “Camara”, by Kodzo ‘Camara’ Wilkinson, July 5 & 6, 2014, Spice Quest

July 5, 2014 at 1:03 am (Exposed) (, , , , )

What: Exhibition “Camara”, by Kodzo ‘Camara’ Wilkinson

When: Saturday July 5 & Sunday July 6, 2014, 11:30-15:00 hrs & 18:30-23:00 hrs

Where: Spice Quest, Dr. J.F. Nassylaan 107, Paramaribo

Kodzo Wilkinson, "CAMARA" / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Kodzo Wilkinson, “CAMARA” / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

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Kodzo WIlkinson, 'Unforgiven / Courtesy Kodzo Wilkinson

Kodzo WIlkinson, ‘Unforgiven / Courtesy Kodzo Wilkinson

Kodzo Wilkinson / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Kodzo Wilkinson / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

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Kodzo ‘Camara’ Wilkinson (1980) is an artist who has recently returned from  Guyana to once again settle in his country of birth, Suriname. It is his second return.

As a boy he was briefly enrolled at the Nola Hatterman Institute, and after that at the E.R. Burrowes School of Art in Guyana. To his feeling, he only really got into art once he started teaching it himself. That was almost ten years ago.

In his latest series of paintings the tree has a central role, not so much because of its representation in nature, in reality, but in a symbolic sense. Various interpretations thereof are possible. It is striking that he often explicitly paints also the roots of the trees, and that the leaf cover is left to a minimum. It is most probable that this imagery refers to his own experience of being uprooted. That the tree of wisdom is left behind in a rather bare state, can possibly be seen in that context as well. His forced emigrations are possibly the evidence of wisdom in decline.

In this particular work – ‘Unforgiven’ from 2014 – it seems as though he has translated this latest aspect into his painting technique. He has burned off part of the edges of the image and in the center of the canvas holes appear to have turned up. There he has once again (roughly) removed the paint.

That application of different layers – he paints on linen but prepares it first with a soft layer of latex and wood filler – is a conscious choice. Manipulating the surface therefore becomes easier. The work literally gets depth. In the end he seems to finish his paintings with a transparent gloss. They glisten. They are hidden beneath a protective layer. A finish that, given his penchant for symbolism, is undoubtedly more than just a form of beautification.

Kodzo Wilkinson / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Kodzo Wilkinson / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Kodzo Wilkinson / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Kodzo Wilkinson / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Kodzo Wilkinson / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Kodzo Wilkinson / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Kodzo Wilkinson / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Kodzo Wilkinson / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Kodzo Wilkinson / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Kodzo Wilkinson / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

In fact, Wilkinson is an artist who is still searching. He has little experience as a full time artist. His latest series of works do indicate that he is finding his way. I think that it is good then, that he sticks to the country that is most dear to him.

TEXT Rob Perrée, Amsterdam, May 2014

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

Kodzo Wilkinson / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Kodzo Wilkinson / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Kodzo Wilkinson / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Kodzo Wilkinson / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Kodzo Wilkinson / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

Kodzo Wilkinson / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2014

 

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An Eye for Art: George Struikelblok – ‘Lob Makandra 2′

July 2, 2014 at 9:08 am (An Eye for Art) (, , , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed a new, informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week ‘Lob Makandra 2’, mixed media on canvas, 35 cm wide x 60 cm high, 2012, by George Struikelblok.

‘Lob Makandra 2’, mixed media on canvas, 35 cm wide x 60 cm high, 2012 - USD 350 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

‘Lob Makandra 2’, mixed media on canvas, 35 cm wide x 60 cm high, 2012 – USD 350 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

George Struikelblok (Paramaribo, 1973) is a multifaceted artist. Paintings, installations, sculptures, assemblages, art in public spaces: no medium seems taboo for him. Several years ago he even brought one of his paintings literally to life, by making a performance out of it, a dance led by live music.

Yet it is especially because of his paintings that he is so well known, not just in Suriname, but also abroad.

There are several possible explanations for this, the most important one being their recognizability. Struikelblok often works in the same style. There are almost always moving, black outlined figures, which refer to people. Their heads look like balloons. Faces, let alone facial expressions, are missing. Their bodies resemble a type of fan. Often they are surrounded by a row of numbers or letters. There are always, as are in the bottom right of this painting, two rows of ‘teeth’ somewhere. The shapes contrast in color with their background. That background has no identity. It reminds me of a palette asking for fresh paint. The color panes always incorporate drops. His ‘Pollockian’ working method probably has something to do with that: Just like the American artist Jackson Pollock he lays his canvases on the floor and works on them straight from the paint can.

The colorfulness of his canvases is another thing that really catches the eye. They radiate happiness. They are a visual translation of optimism. Also in their symbolic significance, they refuse to become bleak.

That colorfulness is more than a stylistic device. Struikelblok’s theme revolves around love, in many varieties. This work is a clear example thereof: two figures, seeking contact with one another, who are about to embrace. Whereas in his earlier work his absent father was a recurring theme, it seems as though since becoming a father himself, this personal drama has been dealt with, or at least pushed towards the background.

George Struikelblok is a successful artist. That is in the first place due to the type of work that he makes, but also because he realizes that as an artist you have to be active, must take the initiative, and direct your view towards the wider world. Struikelblok is a Surinamese artist who thinks internationally.

TEXT Rob Perrée, Amsterdam, June 2014

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Want to take a closer, personal look at this work? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about George Struikelblok please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/georgestruikelblok.

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More work by George Struikelblok available in Readytex Art Gallery:

George Struikelblok, 'Mi lobi yu', mixed media on canvas, 57 cm wide x 145 cm high, 2013 - USD 800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

George Struikelblok, ‘Mi lobi yu’, mixed media on canvas, 57 cm wide x 145 cm high, 2013 – USD 800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

George Struikelblok, 'Untitled 4', mixed media on vinyl, 40 cm wide x 40 cm high, 2013 - USD 200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

George Struikelblok, ‘Untitled 4′, mixed media on vinyl, 40 cm wide x 40 cm high, 2013 – USD 200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

George Struikelblok, 'We tan nanga makandra', mixed media on canvas, 150 cm wide x 150 cm high, 2011 - USD 1300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

George Struikelblok, ‘We tan nanga makandra’, mixed media on canvas, 150 cm wide x 150 cm high, 2011 – USD 1300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

LOGO eye for art

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on July 02, 2014 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on July 02, 2014.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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An Eye for Art: Reinier Asmoredjo

June 18, 2014 at 11:26 am (An Eye for Art) (, , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed a new, informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week ‘Flower’, acrylic on paper, 46 cm wide x 60 cm high, 2011, by Reinier Asmoredjo.

Reinier Asmoredjo, 'Flower', acrylic on paper, 46x60 cm, 2011 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Reinier Asmoredjo, ‘Flower’, acrylic on paper, 46×60 cm, 2011 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Reinier Asmoredjo (Paramaribo, 1962) makes ceramic objects, colorful vases, but is primarily a painter.  A meticulous painter who seems to find technique important. He applies thin layers one on top of the other, with great eye for detail, in colors inspired by the sun, sourced from a rich imagination, skimming reality.

This work – ‘Flower’ from 2011 – struck me because of its simplicity. Asmoredjo does not work from a carefully thought-out theoretical concept. He paints everyday life as it manifests itself to him. Within that everyday life, women are his favorite theme.  Maroon women and Javanese women, usually in profile, placed within an environment in which there is room for symbols. This work is atypical insofar that it is done in a style that is somewhere between abstract and figurative, because it is limited to only a few colors and because it also involves a quite modest use of symbolism. On the foreground is a flower with virginally white leaves. The flower coincides with  a part of the woman’s forehead. The woman as a flower. That flower seems to, like a magnifying glass, direct the attention towards her hairdo. The round shape thereof is repeated as a frame or an encircling of the portrait. On the other hand, the  round shape is challenged by the white square on the left of the canvas. It seems as though it is put there for that reason. Why he paints the woman in blue, is not immediately clear. Blue is often seen as a symbol of perseverance. A female characteristic perhaps, which is greatly appreciated by Asmoredjo? That is possible. It is good that the artist raises questions and thus stimulates the imagination of the viewer.

Reinier Asmoredjo is highly productive. With reason. His themes may be somewhat limited, but he tries out many possibilities in order to give shape to them in the most surprising way possible.

TEXT Rob Perrée, Amsterdam, June 2014

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Want to take a closer, personal look at this work? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Reinier Asmoredjo please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/reinierasmoredjo.

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More work by Reinier Asmoredjo available in Readytex Art Gallery:

asmoredjo confrontation

Reinier Asmoredjo, 'Vurige liefde' [Flaming love], acrylic on canvas, 46x47 cm, 2009 - USD 350 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Reinier Asmoredjo, ‘Vurige liefde’ [Flaming love], acrylic on canvas, 46×47 cm, 2009 – USD 350 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Reinier Asmoredjo, 'Touch of the Sun', acrylic on canvas, 70x94 cm, 2011 - USD 700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Reinier Asmoredjo, ‘Touch of the Sun’, acrylic on canvas, 70×94 cm, 2011 – USD 700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Reinier Asmoredjo, 'Girls', acrylic on canvas, 70x103 cm, 2011 - USD 700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Reinier Asmoredjo, ‘Girls’, acrylic on canvas, 70×103 cm, 2011 – USD 700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

LOGO eye for art

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on June 18, 2014 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on June 18, 2014.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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A Close Look: Inspiration has various faces

June 5, 2014 at 7:44 pm (A Close Look) (, , , , , , , , , , , , )

About the exhibition ‘Inspired’ in the CBK Zuidoost (also on Facebook)

Inspiration has various faces

During exhibitions I often ask myself to what extent the location or the surroundings influence my perception. Inspired is an exhibition “about religion, rituals and death”. Presentation of such an exhibition in the Amsterdam Bijlmermeer is in principle very logical. No neighborhood in the city is so saturated with religion as Southeast. Due to the composition of the population – the majority of the residents come from Suriname, the Antilles or from Africa – is religion, whatever religion it is, and the accompanying rituals, an important part of daily life. Other uses are feverishly being sought for churches in the inner-city of Amsterdam in order to be able to retain the buildings, while in the Bijlmer homes and other locations are being sought in order to be able to provide shelter for the many believers. It is unavoidable that the ‘local’ resident experience the exposition ‘inspired’ differently than the average canal-belt resident. As a disbeliever but convinced Bijlmermeerder I have a sometimes confusing in-between position therein.

Remy Jungerman, ‘Ultimate Resistance’, 2014 and Hamid El Kanboui, without title (portraits), 2013 | PHOTO Courtesy CBK Zuidoost

Remy Jungerman, ‘Ultimate Resistance’, 2014 and Hamid El Kanboui, without title (portraits), 2013 | PHOTO Courtesy CBK Zuidoost

Remy Jungerman, ‘Ultimate Resistance’, 2014 | PHOTO Courtesy artist

Remy Jungerman, ‘Ultimate Resistance’, 2014 | PHOTO Courtesy artist

In the first space Inspired immediately sets the tone. A large sculpture from Remy Jungerman (Moengo, 1959) captures full attention. Two cubes, with a small space between them, are placed one on top of the other. They are covered with Vlisco-materials (a Dutch company that could never have existed without slavery and colonialism) and finished thereafter with kaolin, a white, porcelain-like cement material which is found under the bauxite in the Surinamese interior (Moengo), (just as the materials) is used during winti rituals and today still under the appropriate brand name Power Pemba being traded by the Moengo Minerals company. Jungerman has succeeded in implicitly mixing the theme into a sculpture which makes an impression even without those connotations.

 Hamid El Kanboui, untitled (portraits), 2013 | PHOTO Courtesy artist

Hamid El Kanboui, untitled (portraits), 2013 | PHOTO Courtesy artist

Jungerman’s work faces towards a wall with six ‘drawings’ (a reference to the six days in the story of creation) from Hamid El Kanbouhi (Larache, 1976). In his increasingly familiarstyle of rough, mostly black lines and spots, he sketches simple and thus moving scenes which show how cultures (read also: religions) allow themselves to be identified but also to be mixed.  Contradictions go hand in hand. His loose style results in a beautiful contrast with Jungerman’s austere work.

Lena Davidovich, ‘Raised from the Death’, 2004 | PHOTO Courtesy artist

Lena Davidovich, ‘Raised from the Death’, 2004 | PHOTO Courtesy artist

It is dangerous to have two home strikes at the start of an exhibition. The other works seem to immediately need to compete with them. That is not always successful. Lena Davidovich (Bobruisk, 1970) tells the unbelievable (!) story of a Nigerian clergyman who gets a second chance after dying in a car accident: ‘Raised from the Death’ (2004). Superstition, religion and rituals have formed a monstrous alliance. The story is a sort of visual diary laid out in an animation and a showcase in which the scenes from the video are explained. The scenes are painted expressionistic, with an effective use of color; the animation has been filmed in a seemingly clumsy manner (William Kentridge has made this style popular) which gives rise to emotions. Because the commentary voice is that of the dead clergyman, the work – intentional or unintentional – gets a comparative tone.

Avantia Damberg, ‘The After Life’, 2014 | PHOTO Courtesy artist

Avantia Damberg, ‘The After Life’, 2014 | PHOTO Courtesy artist

That comparative tone is missing in the work of Curaçao’s Avantia Damberg (Leeuwarden, 1977). She also contributed an animation: – ‘The After Life’ (2014) – and a series of drawings which are apart from the animation. The content of the animation is derived from conversations which Damberg conducted with religious friends. These havebeen converted in a lively, indicative manner into moving scenes, but the added storytelling voice has too much of a messenger’s tone formy taste. She attempts to steer me too much. Art is for open questions, not for steering.

Saliou Traoré, ‘I am so surprised’, 2014 | PHOTO Courtesy artist

Saliou Traoré, ‘I am so surprised’, 2014 | PHOTO Courtesy artist

In the filmed performance of Saliou Traoré (Burkina Faso) – ‘I am so surprised’ from 2014 – the artist plays the role of a Christian pastor who attempts to win souls on location in the Bijlmer. Because he has little success and because his presentation can hardly be more cliche-like, the work is seen as a mockery or at least a critical approach to the phenomenon. If that is also the intention . . . ???

Kostana Banovic, ‘Tevhid’, 2014 | PHOTO Courtesy artist

Koštana Banović, ‘Tevhid’, 2014 | PHOTO Courtesy artist

The video-installation ‘Tevhid’ (2014) from Koštana Banović (Sarajevo, 1965) is in fact a registration of various mourning rituals spread over three monitors. In this way a composition of scenes emerge which allows the work to rise far above the regular documentary. Unfortunately the work has too little physical space. Bigger projection would have given the work more impact. The presentation is too discreet.

Ida van der Lee, ‘The Remembrance Cabinet’, 2009 | PHOTO Courtesy artist

Ida van der Lee, ‘The Remembrance Cabinet’, 2009 | PHOTO Courtesy artist

Ida van der Lee’s work – ‘The Remembrance Cabinet’ from 2009 – also has presentation problems. The table and the whole-lot-of spaces-cabinet almost stand in the way. They are both filled with objects that give rise to memories of deceased loved ones. As visitor you may add your own object there.  Because the objects are personal and have little emotional or esthetic value for the average viewer, the work gets the character of being an arbitrary display. The work is too private to be able to estimate its value. I was a bit ashamed of my sober approach, but the presentation misses the load which a personal subject as this needs for it to appeal in a universal manner.

Inspired is an interesting and daring exposition. Such a theme can quickly lead to one on one works – flat translations of the theme – or giving space to misplaced emotions. That did not happen. There is unbalance in the quality: the first space has a higher level than the second. That is not always caused by the work of the artists, but surely also by the lack of space which they have there.

I am curious about what the reaction to this exhibition would have been if it was presented in a gallery somewherein the center of Amsterdam. Lots of Bijlmer residents most likely have more affinity with the theme and are most likely better able to identify the customs and procedures due to their cultural background. On the one hand that fact makes it, as they say, logical that Inspired stands in CBK Zuidoost (also on Facebook), while on the other hand that also forms a valid motive and a challenge to stage the exhibition elsewhere.

TEXT Rob Perrée, Amsterdam, May 2014

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

TRANSLATION David F. Michael

 

What: Inspired [Bezield], seven artists about religion, rituals and death: Koštana Banović, Avantia Damberg, Lena Davidovich, Remy Jungerman, Hamid El Kanbouhi, Ida van der Lee and Saliou Traoré

When: until June 29, 2014. Opening hours: Tuesday, Wednesday & Saturday: 11:00-17:00 hrs, Thursday: 11:00-20:00 hrs, Saturday: 10:00-17:00 hrs, or by appointment

Where: CBK Zuidoost (also on Facebook), Anton de Komplein 120, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

 

A video (trailer of Posso Entrar [May I Enter]) by Koštana Banović:

 

A video (trailer of Traffic Mum) by Saliou Traoré:

 

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An Eye for Art: Roddney Tjon Poen Gie

June 4, 2014 at 1:53 pm (An Eye for Art) (, , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed a new, informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week ‘Missing link’, acrylic on canvas, 190 cm wide x 150 cm high, 2009, by Roddney Tjon Poen Gie.

Roddney Tjon Poen Gie, 'Missing link', acrylic on canvas, 190wx150h, 2009 - USD 1200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Roddney Tjon Poen Gie, ‘Missing link’, , acrylic on canvas, 190wx150h, 2009 – USD 1200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

This painting is from Roddney Tjon Poen Gie (Paramaribo, 1962). He is currently attracting attention because he has just made an enormous sculpture for the Sculpture Park in Moengo. He also makes small sculptures. He works with ceramic, but especially with pieces of wood or branches which he finds in his immediate surroundings. His paintings seem to be placed in the distance due to that three-dimensional work. Still, the differences between his three-dimensional work and his ‘flat’ work are less than they seem.

What immediately catches the eye are the colors which Tjon Poen Gie uses. They display rays of joy. Still, with this painting you could ask yourself if the colors are not being used as contrast, to ask attention for the serious content. Is it not notable that he also portrays the colors in words? Does that not indicate that he is ‘warning’ about a readily available interpretation? Is the shuffling and splashing with colors in the background not another indication of that?

So as he says himself: “I am a mix of a Chinese and a Creole.” As such, to lots of fellow nationals he lacks a clear identity. He resists that because he is in the first place Surinamese. That is why he attempts to bring different cultures together in his work. That is why he mixes Chinese language signs with those of the Maroons. That is why he combines positive water elements – he sees water as symbolic of the Chinese who worked on the Surinamese water management – with the proud colors of the maroons. That is why the central figure in this painting is a mixture of human and animal, a symbol of fusion.

Is the title – ‘Missing Link’- a message to the viewer? Must they go in search of the missing link? Do they insufficiently see the links between the different races? Do they insufficiently see that unity can also hide in diversity?

There is yet another factor which diminishes the alleged difference between painting and sculpture. Roddney Tjon Poen Gie convincingly shows in this work how you could bring space into a painting. The central figure stands clearly in the foreground. The background is the décor for the space in which he (or she) moves.

TEXT Rob Perrée, Amsterdam, May 2014

TRANSLATION David F. Michael, 2014

Want to take a closer, personal look at this work? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Roddney Tjon Poen Gie please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/roddneytjonpoengie.

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More work by Roddney Tjon Poen Gie available in Readytex Art Gallery:

Roddney Tjon Poen Gie, 'Lifebuoy', acrylic on driftwood, 110wx79h, 2010 - USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Roddney Tjon Poen Gie, ‘Lifebuoy’, acrylic on driftwood, 110wx79h, 2010 – USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Roddney Tjon Poen Gie, 'Submerged', acrylic on wood, 80wx85hx55d, 2014 - USD 350 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Roddney Tjon Poen Gie, ‘Submerged’, acrylic on wood, 80wx85hx55d, 2014 – USD 350 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Roddney Tjon Poen Gie, 'Guards', acrylic on wood, 90wx170hx60d, 2009 - USD 1200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Roddney Tjon Poen Gie, ‘Guards’, acrylic on wood, 90wx170hx60d, 2009 – USD 1200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Roddney Tjon Poen Gie, 'Drager' [Carrier], acrylic on wood, 101wx102hx9d, 2009 - USD 700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Roddney Tjon Poen Gie, ‘Drager’ [Carrier], acrylic on wood, 101wx102hx9d, 2009 – USD 700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Roddney Tjon Poen Gie, 'Seduction', acrylic on canvas, 132wx92h, 2009 - USD 785 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Roddney Tjon Poen Gie, ‘Seduction’, acrylic on canvas, 132wx92h, 2009 – USD 785 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

LOGO eye for art

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on June 04, 2014 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on June 04, 2014.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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An Eye for Art: Humhrey Tawjoeram

May 21, 2014 at 8:14 am (An Eye for Art) (, , , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed a new, informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This time the untitled art work from the exhibition New Impressions, watercolor on paper, 48 cm wide x 68 cm high, 2007, by Humphrey Tawjoeram.

Humphrey Tawjoeram, untitled, watercolor on paper, 48 cm wide x 68 cm high, 2007 (Exhbition 'New Impressions' - USD 400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Humphrey Tawjoeram, untitled, watercolor on paper, 48 cm wide x 68 cm high, 2007 (Exhibition ‘New Impressions’) – USD 400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Humphrey Tawjoeram (1964, Redi Doti, Para, Suriname) calls himself an emotional painter. In fact he doesn’t like to make sketches before he starts with a painting or a watercolor. He prefers to just let whatever comes, come. That does not mean however that he doesn’t allow himself to be inspired. The everyday surroundings, especially nature, are things that he soaks up explicitly. Those are then translated into his work.

That translation is usually abstract.  That is quite noticeable in this work, a watercolor from 2007. They are in fact organic shapes, but they don’t portray anything other than just themselves. They can be interpreted as natural shapes, as shapes that resemble plants or other ‘growths’ from nature. Tawjoeram aims to keep that as open as possible. Where he is concerned, viewers may interpret it however they like.

To him they are compositions, compositions that usually work from the middle towards the edges of the surface. Just like a knot that is being untied.  His colors are subdued, but I am under the impression that he chooses to do so consciously in order to allow the few accents that he does add, the few more pronounced color planes that he does include, to stand out better.

Occasionally, like a few years ago for example, it seems as though a bit more figuration sneaks into his work. Those are the times when he is wondering ‘what’s next’. The great thing about it is that he then consults his cultural background.  And then it becomes noticeable that he belongs to the original inhabitants of Suriname. The Arawaks. He then needs those special roots to find a way out of a bogged down creative process. His ancestors and the rituals and customs associated with them, provide the incentive to do so.

His watercolors in particular, remind me of the work by Georgia O’Keeffe (1887-1986), the American painter who found inspiration in the landscape of New Mexico.  Comparable use of color, sensual, organic shapes that remain somewhere in between the abstract and the figurative, and an inexhaustible love of nature.

TEXT Rob Perrée, Amsterdam, May 2014

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Want to take a closer, personal look at this work? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Humphrey Tawjoeram please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/humphreytawjoeram.

Print

More work by Humphrey Tawjoeram available in Readytex Art Gallery:

Humprey Tawjoeram, 'Untitled 1181602', Siberian chalk on paper, 51x66cm - USD 250 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Humprey Tawjoeram, ‘Untitled 1181602′, Siberian chalk on paper, 51x66cm – USD 250 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Humprey Tawjoeram, 'Vreemde omgeving' [Strange surroundings], mixed media on paper, 48x68cm, 2007 (from the exhibition 'New Impressions') - USD 400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Humprey Tawjoeram, ‘Vreemde omgeving’ [Strange surroundings], mixed media on paper, 48x68cm, 2007 (from the exhibition ‘New Impressions’) – USD 400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Humprey Tawjoeram, 'Identiteit' [Identity], mixed media on paper, 34x49cm, 2007 (from the exhibition 'New Impressions') - USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Humprey Tawjoeram, ‘Identiteit’ [Identity], mixed media on paper, 34x49cm, 2007 (from the exhibition ‘New Impressions’) – USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Humprey Tawjoeram, 'Chaos', acrylic on canvas, 65x120cm, 2011 - USD 650 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Humprey Tawjoeram, ‘Chaos’, acrylic on canvas, 65x120cm, 2011 – USD 650 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Humprey Tawjoeram, 'Landscape 5 0353', acrylic on paper, 70x50cm, 2011 - USD 400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Humprey Tawjoeram, ‘Landscape 5 0353′, acrylic on paper, 70x50cm, 2011 – USD 400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

oog-voor-kunst-kleur-rgb

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on May 21, 2014 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on May 21, 2014.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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An Eye for Art: Marcel Pinas

May 7, 2014 at 10:15 am (An Eye for Art) (, , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed a new, informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This time the art work ‘Mi o luku yu 8339′, print & mixed media on canvas, 93 cm wide x 70 cm high, 2009, by Marcel Pinas.

Marcel Pinas, '', / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Marcel Pinas, ‘Mi o luku yu 8339′, print & mixed media on canvas, 93x70cm, 2009 – USD 1500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Many Surinamese know Marcel Pinas (Pelgrimkondre, 1971) for his colorful paintings with (decorative) elements referring to the disappearing Maroon culture – especially to the Afaka script, which was developed and used in his native region in the beginning of the 20th century – but also to different games he used play as a child, symbols of a happy past.

Many also know him for his large installations. In those he usually refers to the dangers threatening the interior (such as environmental pollution) and to the friendly hospitality which is so typical for his people.

Less famous are the drawings he has been making again in recent years – Afaka signs which playfully claim the white space for themselves  – and the mixed-media-works such as this one, ‘Mi o luku yu 8339’ from 2009. A detail of a house has been printed on canvas. Probably a home in a Maroon village in the district Marowijne. A house that stands for (his) youth. Why else is that little girl drawn on the left of the door frame? Childlike. In red and yellow. On the door itself, Afaka characters seemingly flutter downwards. Does the falling motion here refer to things getting lost? The largely intact house number does not have the power to stop that from happening.

A little beyond the middle Pinas has painted a larger shape. Bright red and bright blue, in stark contrast to the fading color of the house, yet corresponding to the red of the child. What it is I don’t know. I do know that it demands attention, that it wants to dominate. A youthful memory that must not be forgotten? An elementary monument for the Maroons?

Marcel Pinas wants to give their culture, in essence their pride,  back to the Maroons. That is why he stimulates and facilitates all kinds of creative activities for the young people in Moengo, who have more talent than opportunities. That is why he does everything he can to present art in his native region. That is why he makes paintings, drawings and installations which can and should be shown especially abroad, to thus lift his local story to an international level.

Whereas Erwin de Vries was for many years the unofficial representative of Suriname abroad, Marcel Pinas has now quite convincingly taken over that role from him.

TEXT Rob Perrée, New York, April 2014

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Want to take a closer, personal look at this work? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Marcel Pinas please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/marcelpinas/.

Print

More work by Marcel Pinas available in Readytex Art Gallery:

Marcel Pinas, 'Bakisi Kisi 8338', print and mixed media on canvas, 70x93cm, 2009 - USD 1500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Marcel Pinas, ‘Bakisi Kisi 8338′, print and mixed media on canvas, 70x93cm, 2009 – USD 1500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Marcel Pinas, 'Afaka libi 1', mixed media on canvas, 145x86cm, 2011 - USD 2500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Marcel Pinas, ‘Afaka libi 1′, mixed media on canvas, 145x86cm, 2011 – USD 2500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Marcel Pinas, 'Kibri a kulturu 1', mixed media on canvas, 30x30cm, 2013 - USD 350 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Marcel Pinas, ‘Kibri a kulturu 1′, mixed media on canvas, 30x30cm, 2013 – USD 350 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Marcel Pinas, 'Afaka buku pikin 3', pen drawing on paper, 17x23cm, 2013 - USD 250 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Marcel Pinas, ‘Afaka buku pikin 3′, pen drawing on paper, 17x23cm, 2013 – USD 250 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

oog-voor-kunst-kleur-rgb

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on May 7, 2014 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on May 7, 2014.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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The new ‘SAX’ has arrived, edition 9!

April 29, 2014 at 9:53 pm (Interesting reads) (, , )

SAX 09 logo

It is with great pleasure that we present to you the latest edition of Sranan Art Xposed. It has once more become a varied issue with interviews, portraits, news and other fun items.

- Kurt Nahar went to Cuba

- DeKuS, a great new hot spot for art lovers in Paramaribo (also on Facebook)

- Purcy Tjin on SAX‘s first Artist’s Pages ever, with sehn-sucht

- Art in Development from Christopher Cozier

In this edition for now, the last contributions from Priscilla Tosari. Right from the start she has  covered, from her home in Amsterdam, all the art news from the Netherlands and has thought along and worked along as member of our core editing team. Thank you Priscilla, and good luck in all of your future endeavors!

We would also like to welcome a new colleague: Bart Krieger. He has previously written for SAX in de Ware Tijd and on the Sranan Art-blog: a double portrait about Annemarie Daniel and Ruben Cabenda who are studying at the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in the Netherlands.

Download it here:

SAX 9 Nederlandse editie apr14

SAX 9 English edition apr14

Or here where all the back issues can be found, in Dutch and English.

Do you know that you can follow us on Facebook? Like us and share the link with others so that we can acquire more readers for SAX !

BLOG http://srananart.wordpress.com/
FACEBOOK http://www.facebook.com/pages/SAXSranan-Art-Xposed/121474048032615
PHOTOS http://www.flickr.com/photos/srananart/
VIDEOS http://vimeo.com/user6622619
TWITTER http://twitter.com/srananart
REACTIONS srananart@gmail.com

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An Eye for Art: Sri Irodikromo

April 23, 2014 at 9:42 am (An Eye for Art) (, , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed a new, informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This time the art work ‘Hebi’, mixed media on canvas, 157 cm wide x 152 cm high, 2013, by Sri Irodikromo.

Sei Irodikromo, ‘Hebi’, mixed media on canvas, 157 cm wide x 152 cm high, 2013 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sei Irodikromo, ‘Hebi’, mixed media on canvas, 157 cm wide x 152 cm high, 2013 – USD 1750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

The head of a woman. In profile. From very close up. Of indefinable age. It is impossible to tell what is going on in her head.  She does not appear to be looking at anything. Her look seems to be somewhere in between despondent and sad.  She has been painted in loose strokes. Detailed, but the paint seems to hardly touch the canvas. That ‘careful’ way of painting lends a high degree vulnerability to the portrait.

White, yellow, orange and red are the main colors. The woman is traditionally clothed.  Surrounding her head, underneath the paint, several symbols are visible. Decorations that refer to the maroon culture. They seem to swirl. The red paint stains on her face have a dramatizing effect. Right above her lips is a line of stitching. Does the work really consist of two sewn together pieces, or is it a matter of suggestion?  In either case it serves to underline the vulnerability of the whole.

Sri Irodikromo is born in Schiedam in 1972. Her artistic education however, begins at the  Nola Hatterman Institute in Suriname. She now lives and works in Suriname as well, following  a period of several years when she studied at the ‘Vrije Kunst Academie’ in The Hague. Her work can be viewed as symbolic for the country. She repeatedly incorporates signs and symbols from every ethnic group in the country. As though she wants to prove that a multi-cultural population can also form a unity. Even though the backgrounds and the cultures are different, in day to day life they do come together.

That unifying factor is also translated by Sri in the way she works. She combines (sometimes in one work) various techniques: she does batik, she paints, she draws, she sews, she stencils. She is equally generous in her choice of size. This work – ‘Hebi’ from 2013 – measures 157 x 152 cm. The batik work ‘Ingiwinti’ that Sri contributed to Paramaribo SPAN in 2010, was monumental in size. It hung many meters down.

Women are usually the subject of her work.  Though multi-cultural Suriname may live together harmoniously, it is often women who determine how that cohabitation is actually arranged in practice. They are the dominant factor. The same applies to the work of Sri Irodikromo.

TEXT Rob Perrée, New York, April 2014

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Want to take a closer, personal look at this work? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Sri Irodikromo please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/sri/.

Print

Sri Irodikromo in her studio during 'Paramaribo SPAN' / PHOTO Roy Tjin, 2010

Sri Irodikromo in her studio during ‘Paramaribo SPAN’ / PHOTO Roy Tjin, 2010

Sri Irodikromo's first Ingiwinti work, in her home / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2010

Sri Irodikromo’s first Ingiwinti work, in her home / PHOTO Marieke Visser, 2010

Sri Irodikromo, 'Ingiwinti', 2010 / PHOTO Nicholas Laughlin

Sri Irodikromo, ‘Ingiwinti’, 2010 / PHOTO Nicholas Laughlin

A blog post was written about this work of art by Sri, for the Paramaribo SPAN-blog.

More work by Sri Irodikromo:

Sri Irodikromo, 'Denki', mixed media on canvas, 65x100cm, 2010 - USD 850 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sri Irodikromo, ‘Denki’, mixed media on canvas, 65x100cm, 2010 – USD 850 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sri Irodikromo, 'Pari', mixed media on canvas, 38x158cm, 2012 - USD 900 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sri Irodikromo, ‘Pari’, mixed media on canvas, 38x158cm, 2012 – USD 900 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

oog-voor-kunst-kleur-rgb

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on April 23, 2014 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on April 23, 2014.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

 

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