‘De Dragers van het Beeld’ / ‘The Carriers of the Image’ – 1 – Introduction

June 8, 2017 at 11:01 pm (Been there, Exposed) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

De Dragers van het Beeld, in English: The Carriers of the Image, is an art exhibition that was held in the foyer of Theatre Thalia, from April 28 until May 7, 2017. It was part of the celebration of 180 years Theatre Thalia. Eight visual artists worked with the theme of death, and more: resurrection from death, new life …

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi wrote a series of columns that we will be sharing on the SAX-blog. Today part 1. Please find the Dutch text under the English text. 

Dragers van het beeld
17951608_10158518038525494_1839296243347417041_n

A Sparkling New Life

Alakondre [literally meaning: of all countries] is the word that we should use to brand Suriname’, said Alida Neslo. With that statement she found an immediate ally within me. This alliance would be continued, as I became the coordinator for visual arts of a team dedicated to celebrate the 180th anniversary of Theatre Thalia in a fitting way. The celebration of 180 years Thalia should breathe new and sparkling life into the theatre.

The Theme

In many cultures death is seen as the end of one life and the beginning of another new life. As a team dedicated to the celebration of 180 years Thalia, we initially spoke more about death and the way in which different cultures process death. But almost simultaneously, the discussion started to revolve around what happens after death: reincarnation, the afterlife, rebirth, etc. The most dominant question that came up was: How is this interpreted by different people and by different cultures? The theme for the celebration of Thalia 180 years, started to develop from here. Eros, Thanatos and Phoenix were brought forward as points of departure for the theme of the celebration. Eros as life energy, Thanatos as the non-violent peaceful death and the Phoenix as the symbol of eternal life; a cyclical life of passing and rebirth.

Visual Art

The theme was presented to the eight participating visual artists: Razia Barsatie, Anand Binda, Winston van der Bok, Soeki Irodikromo, Sri Irodikromo, Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, George Struikelblok and Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi. Each artist was inspired by an entirely different aspect of the theme.

The diverse interpretations of the theme are elaborated upon in various short columns, which will help the public to better understand what the works of art displayed in the celebratory exhibition of Theatre Thalia 180 years are actually about. This visual art exhibition was on display from April 28 until May 7, 2017. In addition to the visual art exhibition there also was a Living Art Show, which was presented within the dance program in the weekend of May 5-7, 2017. It was a collaboration between visual artists and performance artists. The artistic concepts, created by the visual artists, were interpreted and performed by the performance artists. The coordination of the Living Art Show was in the hands of Dweight Warsodikromo.

TEXT Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, 2017

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi is a female visual artist from Suriname. She works and lives in Paramaribo, Suriname, South America. Kit-Ling studied visual art in Suriname and in the Netherlands. In 2005 Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi added the short video-film as a medium to her artwork. Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi makes paintings and drawings, inspired by the tropical rainforest, and the richness of the diverse cultures in Suriname.

Kit-Ling was the featured visual artist at the 13th International Conference of the Association of Caribbean Women Writers and Scholars. This conference, The Caribbean, the Land and the People; Women’s Efforts, Women’s Lives, was held in Suriname, in May 2012. Kit-Ling was the recipient of the Bridget Jones Award for 2013.

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2017

PHOTOGRAPHY Ada Korbee & Marieke Visser, 2017

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‘De Dragers van het Beeld’ / ‘The Carriers of the Image’ – 1 – Introduction

‘De Dragers van het Beeld’ / The Carriers of the Image – 2 –  Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi

‘De Dragers van het Beeld’ / The Carriers of the Image – 3 –  Winston van der Bok

‘De Dragers van het Beeld’ / The Carriers of the Image – 4 –  Razia Barsatie

‘De Dragers van het Beeld’ / The Carriers of the Image – 5 –  Soeki Irodikromo

‘De Dragers van het Beeld’ / The Carriers of the Image – 6 –  Dhiradj Ramsamoedj

‘De Dragers van het Beeld’ / The Carriers of the Image – 7 –  Sri Irodikromo

‘De Dragers van het Beeld’ / The Carriers of the Image – 8 – Anand Binda 

‘De Dragers van het Beeld’ / The Carriers of the Image – 9 –  George Struikelblok

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Een sprankelend nieuw leven

Alakondre is het woord waarmee we Suriname moeten branden’, zei Alida Neslo en daarmee had ze in mij een bondgenoot gevonden. Dit bondgenootschap zette zich voort door als coördinator van beeldende kunst plaats te nemen in een team dat zich zou inzetten om 180 jaar Theater Thalia op gepaste wijze te vieren. De viering van 180 jaar Thalia moet Thalia weer nieuw en sprankelend leven inblazen.

Het thema

In veel culturen wordt de dood gezien als het einde van een bepaald leven en het begin van een ander nieuw leven. Als team dat zich wilde inzetten voor de viering van 180 jaar Thalia, spraken we eerst meer over de dood en het verwerken van de dood binnen verschillende culturen. Maar bijna simultaan werd er ook gesproken over wat er na de dood gebeurt: de reïncarnatie, het hiernamaals, de wedergeboorte etc. Daarbij werd vooral de vraag gesteld: Hoe wordt dit gezien door verschillende mensen, verschillende culturen? Van daaruit is het thema rond de viering van Thalia 180 jaar zich verder gaan ontwikkelen. Eros, Thanatos en Phoenix (Feniks) werden als uitgangspunten voor het thema binnen de viering van 180 jaar Thalia naar voren geschoven. Eros als levensenergie, Thanatos als de geweldloze zachte dood en de Phoenix als symbool van een eeuwig leven; een cyclisch leven van heengaan en wedergeboorte.

Beeldende kunst

Het thema werd voorgelegd aan de acht (8) deelnemende beeldende kunstenaars, te weten Razia Barsatie, Anand Binda, Winston van der Bok, Soeki Irodikromo, Sri Irodikromo, Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, George Struikelblok en Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi. Elke kunstenaar werd geïnspireerd door een geheel andere aspect van het thema.

De diverse interpretaties van het thema zijn in verschillende korte columns uiteen gezet en op deze manier kwam het kunstminnend publiek meer te weten over de inhoud van de kunstwerken die in de feestexpositie van Theater Thalia 180 jaar te zien waren. Deze beeldende kunstexpositie was te zien vanaf 28 april tot en met 7 mei 2017. Naast de beeldende kunstexpositie is er ook een Living Art Show gepresenteerd binnen het dansprogramma in het weekend van 5 tot en met 7 mei 2017. Het betrof een samenwerking tussen beeldende kunstenaars en performance artiesten. De kunstconcepten kwamen van de beeldende kunstenaars, maar werden geïnterpreteerd en uitgevoerd door de performance kunstenaars. De coördinatie van de Living Art Show was in handen van Dweight Warsodikromo.

 

 

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Surinamese participation in Plein Air Curacao 2015 (clippings & videos)

April 7, 2015 at 3:16 pm (A Close Look) (, , , , , , , )

Every other year, the tropical island of Curaçao hosts a successful Plein Air Festival. During this festival, local and international plein air artists paint outdoors at various locations on Curaçao. With oils, watercolors, pastels and other media these artists bring to life the beauty of Curaçao, its people and its culture to be permanently exposed abroad through paintings in homes, galleries and musea.

The third edition of the Plein Air Curaçao festival, February 26-March 7, 2015, successfully hosted both Plein Air and Plein Eau painting. Artists came from all corners of the world for the 10-day Caribbean art extravaganza. Artist George Struikelblok (Suriname) lent his expertise and enthusiasm to the Curaçao version of “Big Power of Small Blocks” whereby kids from orphanages and other youth group homes created their art by painting on small wooden blocks. Together with blocks painted by local artists, these “Curaçao Cubes” were exhibited and sold. Proceeds went towards the art programs at these institutions. The festival ended with an exciting 3-hour quick-draw competition and bustling street fair in the historic downtown area of Willemstad.

AD, March 2, 2015

AD, March 2, 2015  

Amigoe, February 27, 2015 1

Amigoe, February 27, 2015 1

Amigoe, February 27, 2015 2

Amigoe, February 27, 2015 2

Clipping, February 28, 2015

Clipping, February 28, 2015

Express, MArch 5, 2015

Express, MArch 5, 2015

Explore Curacao, March 2015

Explore Curacao, March 2015

AD, March 3, 2015

AD, March 3, 2015

 

There was a large delegation from Suriname who participated. Peter Thielen made videos, a series of 11. We show the first one here, the rest can be seen in our Vimeo-collection or on the FVAS Facebook page.

From March 9 through March 18, 2017 Art Foundation Curaçao will host the 4th Plein Air Festival on the tropical island of Curaçao. Local and international artists will paint on land as well as underwater. A variety of media will be used with emphasis on oils, watercolors and pastels. Workshops are given for adults, teens and kids. Paintings made on the last day of the festival are entered in a contest. Paintings made during the festival will be put up for sale.

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An Eye for Art: George Struikelblok – ‘Wan Tranga Famiri′

February 26, 2015 at 10:06 am (An Eye for Art) (, , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed an informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week ‘Wan Tranga Famiri’, mixed media on canvas, 35 cm wide x 60 cm high, 2009, by George Struikelblok.

George Struikelblok, ‘Wan Tranga Famiri’, mixed media on canvas, 141 cm wide x 208 cm high, 2009 - USD 2500 / PHOTO  Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

George Struikelblok, ‘Wan Tranga Famiri’, mixed media on canvas, 141 cm wide x 208 cm high, 2009 – USD 2500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Recently a ‘Giant Painting’ was installed in the departure hall of the Johan Adolf Pengel airport at Zanderij. Led by George Struikelblok (Paramaribo, 1973) – in his capacity as chairman of the Federation of Visual Artists in Suriname (FVAS) – 30 Surinamese artists contributed to this enormous painting. The result: a colorful jumble of images, which make it hard to recognize the work of the individual artists. A true collaborative project, in more ways than one. Because the project generated a lot of publicity, I could look at it without having actually seen it in real life. It did not surprise me that I was still able to immediately recognize Struikelblok’s contribution. He has a signature style that works almost like a company logo. Black outlined figures referring to people, blank heads, letters and numbers lost somewhere on the canvas, like a puzzle asking to be solved, rows of ‘teeth’ placed vertically or horizontally elsewhere on the surface, and perhaps most importantly: mobile multiple colors.

This painting is a good example thereof. The light blue background pushes the central image towards the front. This is made up of much more intense colors. Bright red, green and black dominate. Because Struikelblok paints in a seemingly sloppy way – there are no neat lines that fully connect, ‘spilled’ drops can be seen all over, forms run over or through each other – a dynamic is created that seduces and sparks curiosity.

Because his paintings are always somewhere between abstract and figurative, it is always guessing what exactly you see, or rather what you see in it. At first sight it is to me, a passionate embrace between two lovers. The sparks fly off of it. From some distance, but still quite close by: two other figures that seem to observe. In any case they radiate less energy. The title however, ‘Wan Tranga Famiri’ (Strong family), refers to a close-knit family. These figures could then be, or must be, the children of the excited pair. That is the downside of titles. They take away a part of your freedom. I would have preferred to see those other two in a competitive or an envious role …

Struikelblok uses love as his main theme for quite a while now. With that he has not made it any easier for himself. Somebody once said: happiness is the death of art. Because of his way of painting, because of the emotional impact of his paintings, because of the strength of his images, he has been able to, for now, refer that statement to the land of fiction.

 

TEXT Rob Perrée, Amsterdam, February 2015

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2015

Want to take a closer, personal look at this work? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Steenbakkerijstraat 30, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about George Struikelblok please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/georgestruikelblok.

Print

A previous edition of An Eye for Art about George Struikelblok can be read here:

https://srananart.wordpress.com/2014/07/02/an-eye-for-art-george-struikelblok-lob-makandra-2/ 

NOTE! This work has been sold.‘Lob Makandra 2’, mixed media on canvas, 35 cm wide x 60 cm high, 2012 - USD 350 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

‘Lob Makandra 2’, mixed media on canvas, 35 cm wide x 60 cm high, 2012 – SOLD / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

More work by George Struikelblok available in Readytex Art Gallery (also look at the page Owner 2 Owner):

George Struikelblok, ‘Den Lobi Wan’, mixed media on canvas, 225 cm wide x 151 cm high, year unknown - USD 2500 / PHOTO  Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

George Struikelblok, ‘Den Lobi Wan’, mixed media on canvas, 225 cm wide x 151 cm high, 2012 – USD 2500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

George Struikelblok, 'We tan nanga makandra', mixed media on canvas, 150 cm wide x 150 cm high, 2011 - USD 1300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

George Struikelblok, ‘We tan nanga makandra’, mixed media on canvas, 150 cm wide x 150 cm high, 2011 – USD 1300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

George Struikelblok, 'Mi lobi yu', mixed media on canvas, 57 cm wide x 145 cm high, 2013 - USD 800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

George Struikelblok, ‘Mi lobi yu’, mixed media on canvas, 57 cm wide x 145 cm high, 2013 – USD 800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

LOGO eye for art

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on February 26, 2015 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on February 26, 2015.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

 

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SURIFESTA FVAS Giant Painting, December 13 & 14, 2014

December 11, 2014 at 4:39 pm (Coming up) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

What: SURIFESTA FVAS (also to be found on Facebook) Giant Painting 2014. With: George Struikelblok, Dorette Kuster, Patrick Tjon Jaw Chong, Dakaya Lenz, Erwin de VriesRon FluGlenn Fung LoyRinaldo KlasSoeki IrodikromoAnand Binda, Leo Wong Loi Sing, Jules Brand-Flu, Reinier AsmoredjoAugust Bohé, Ray Daal, Stanny Handigman, Cliff Rasidin, Ardie Setropawiro, Sri Irodikromo, Manuela Tjin A Soe, André Sontosoemarto, Kim Sontosoemarto, Daniel Djojoatmo, Dhiradj RamsamoedjKurt NaharRanjan AkloeLeonnie van EertArti AbhelakhJohan Doelradjak

When: December 13 & 14, 2014, 10:00 hrs till late

Where: Sidewalk Café ‘t Vat, Kleine Waterstraat 1, Paramaribo 

Flyer

Flyer

The previous giant painting, made by FVAS members in 1997. Participants: Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, Ron Flu, Glenn Fung Loy, Rinaldo Klas, Soeki Irodikromo, Anand Binda, Reinier Asmoredjo, August Bohé, Ray Daal, Stanny Handigman, Sharda Harkhoe, Cliff Rasidin, Ardie Setropawiro, Micheal Wong Loi Sing, Anita Hartmann — at Johan Adolf Pengel International Airport

The previous giant painting, made by FVAS members in 1997. Participants: Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, Ron Flu, Glenn Fung Loy, Rinaldo Klas, Soeki Irodikromo, Anand Binda, Reinier Asmoredjo, August Bohé, Ray Daal, Stanny Handigman, Sharda Harkhoe, Cliff Rasidin, Ardie Setropawiro, Micheal Wong Loi Sing, Anita Hartmann — at Johan Adolf Pengel International Airport

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Elsewhere … in La Guyane Française: ‘Made in Surinam’

October 15, 2014 at 9:35 am (Elsewhere) (, , , , , , , , , , )

What: L.A.V.A.G. at L’Encadrier: Made in Surinam. Discover the works of Surinamese artists in an atmosphere of colors: Rinaldo Klas,  Kenneth Flijders, George Struikelblok, Wilgo VijfhovenSri Irodikromo, Reinier Asmoredjo and Dhiradj Ramsamoedj. All artists are core artists affiliated with Readytex Art Gallery.

When: October 17-November 22, 2014. Vernissage: October 17, 2014, 19:00 hrs. Opening hours: Wednesday and Thursday from 18:00-20:00 hrs, Friday and Saturday from 18:00-21:00 hrs. Saturday October 18, the day after the opening: from 10:00-13:00 hrs

Where: L.A.V.A.G. (L’Encadrier), 70, rue Léopold Heder, Cayenne, La Guyane Française

Poster

Poster

In 2010 Readytex Art Gallery and Galerie L’Encadrier in Cayenne, La Guyane Française, started a pleasant cooperation which would create wonderful opportunities for artists working with Readytex Art Gallery. Since then several partner artists of Readytex Art Gallery in Paramaribo have been invited yearly, to exhibit their work at Galerie L’Encadrier. Here a report from 2011, from DevSur.

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An Eye for Art: George Struikelblok – ‘Lob Makandra 2’

July 2, 2014 at 9:08 am (An Eye for Art) (, , , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed a new, informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week ‘Lob Makandra 2’, mixed media on canvas, 35 cm wide x 60 cm high, 2012, by George Struikelblok.

‘Lob Makandra 2’, mixed media on canvas, 35 cm wide x 60 cm high, 2012 - USD 350 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

‘Lob Makandra 2’, mixed media on canvas, 35 cm wide x 60 cm high, 2012 – USD 350 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

George Struikelblok (Paramaribo, 1973) is a multifaceted artist. Paintings, installations, sculptures, assemblages, art in public spaces: no medium seems taboo for him. Several years ago he even brought one of his paintings literally to life, by making a performance out of it, a dance led by live music.

Yet it is especially because of his paintings that he is so well known, not just in Suriname, but also abroad.

There are several possible explanations for this, the most important one being their recognizability. Struikelblok often works in the same style. There are almost always moving, black outlined figures, which refer to people. Their heads look like balloons. Faces, let alone facial expressions, are missing. Their bodies resemble a type of fan. Often they are surrounded by a row of numbers or letters. There are always, as are in the bottom right of this painting, two rows of ‘teeth’ somewhere. The shapes contrast in color with their background. That background has no identity. It reminds me of a palette asking for fresh paint. The color panes always incorporate drops. His ‘Pollockian’ working method probably has something to do with that: Just like the American artist Jackson Pollock he lays his canvases on the floor and works on them straight from the paint can.

The colorfulness of his canvases is another thing that really catches the eye. They radiate happiness. They are a visual translation of optimism. Also in their symbolic significance, they refuse to become bleak.

That colorfulness is more than a stylistic device. Struikelblok’s theme revolves around love, in many varieties. This work is a clear example thereof: two figures, seeking contact with one another, who are about to embrace. Whereas in his earlier work his absent father was a recurring theme, it seems as though since becoming a father himself, this personal drama has been dealt with, or at least pushed towards the background.

George Struikelblok is a successful artist. That is in the first place due to the type of work that he makes, but also because he realizes that as an artist you have to be active, must take the initiative, and direct your view towards the wider world. Struikelblok is a Surinamese artist who thinks internationally.

TEXT Rob Perrée, Amsterdam, June 2014

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

Want to take a closer, personal look at this work? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Maagdenstraat 44-upstairs, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about George Struikelblok please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/georgestruikelblok.

Print

More work by George Struikelblok available in Readytex Art Gallery:

George Struikelblok, 'Mi lobi yu', mixed media on canvas, 57 cm wide x 145 cm high, 2013 - USD 800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

George Struikelblok, ‘Mi lobi yu’, mixed media on canvas, 57 cm wide x 145 cm high, 2013 – USD 800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

George Struikelblok, 'Untitled 4', mixed media on vinyl, 40 cm wide x 40 cm high, 2013 - USD 200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

George Struikelblok, ‘Untitled 4’, mixed media on vinyl, 40 cm wide x 40 cm high, 2013 – USD 200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

George Struikelblok, 'We tan nanga makandra', mixed media on canvas, 150 cm wide x 150 cm high, 2011 - USD 1300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

George Struikelblok, ‘We tan nanga makandra’, mixed media on canvas, 150 cm wide x 150 cm high, 2011 – USD 1300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

LOGO eye for art

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on July 02, 2014 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on July 02, 2014.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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Group exhibition ‘WAT – Working Apart Together’, at De Hal

March 28, 2014 at 1:31 pm (Exposed) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

The first vernissage of Readytex Art Gallery in 2014 just opened its doors. Starting from March the 26th, the public could enjoy the group exhibition WAT – Working Apart Together. In De Hal at de Grote Combéweg 45, where 14 artists present their most recent works of art. Though the artists each work independently, their works still contain a surprising amount of elements, turning this into a cohesive presentation. For visitors the exhibition WAT offers the exiting challenge to discover that cohesiveness and perhaps even identify it.

Banner

Banner

After the positive reactions of the public to the group exhibitions of the past two years, Readytex Art Gallery decided to work according to that same concept  for 2014. This year, instead of two large exhibitions with each time new artworks of just one artist, the gallery will organize two large exhibitions with new works of art by multiple artists. It is a concept that works quite well for the artists, the gallery and for the public as well.

Kurt Nahar and two RAG Team members in front of his installation / PHOTO Ada Korbee, 2014

Kurt Nahar and two RAG Team members in front of his installation / PHOTO Ada Korbee, 2014

Visitors admiring Sri's work / PHOTO Ada Korbee, 2014

Visitors admiring Sri’s work / PHOTO Ada Korbee, 2014

Opening Night / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang, 2014

Opening Night / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang, 2014

The exhibition WAT offers new work by the following artists affiliated to the gallery: Dhiradj Ramsamoedj, George Struikelblok, Hanka Wolterstorff, Kenneth Flijders, Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, Kurt Nahar, Reinier Asmoredjo, René Tosari, Rinaldo Klas, Roddney Tjon Poen Gie, Soeki Irodikromo, Sri Irodikromo, Sunil Puljhun and Wilgo Vijfhoven.

The exhibition provides the public with impulses other than those of a solo exhibition. In WAT Readytex Art Gallery presents a variety of art works: paintings, batik, and sculptures from wood and ceramics. Viewers can also enjoy a diversity of styles. Kurt Nahar for example, presents a selection that was inspired by his recent participation in the ‘Bienal de Pintura Mural Internos‘ in Cuba. In his new art Sunil Puljhun returns  to abstraction and color, contrary to the black and white works he’d been previously immersed in. Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi works from a renewed focus: she researches the Surinamese biodiversity, concentrating especially on bird species. Wilgo Vijfhoven shows transitions in his work and uses a somewhat different visual imagery. Dhiradj Ramsamoedj presents research on canvas, which provides insights into a project that he will soon develop into a series of outdoor, public sculptures.  George Struikelblok gives an exciting new twist to his work and with that offers a glimpse into what is to come at a larger presentation next year.

Readytex Art Gallery and her partner artists invite the public to visit the exhibition WAT – Working Apart Together.  Everyone is welcome in De Hal from Wednesday the 26th until Sunday the 30th of March from 19:00 – 21:00 hrs.

Banner

Banner

TEXT / TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2014

 

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‘Functional Art’ by FVAS-members, De Hal, December 11, 12 & 13, 2013

December 11, 2013 at 4:44 pm (Exposed) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

What: Surifesta exhibition Functional Art by FVAS-members: George StruikelblokKim SontosoemartoKit-Ling Tjon Pian GiSri IrodikromoDorette Kuster, Patrick Tjon, Stanny Handigman, Arti AbelakhRahied Abdoel, Shaundell Horton en Ron Flu.

When: December 11-13, 2013, 10:00-12:30 hrs and 18:00-21:00 hrs

Where: De Hal (Facebook), Grote Combéweg 45, Paramaribo

Introducing the movable garbage bins!

Movable garbage bins

Movable garbage bins

Some pictures of the first day of the exhibition, by FVAS-member photographer Peter Thielen.

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

PHOTO Peter Thielen BNO, 2013

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An exhibition in CBK Zuidoost ‘Gedeelde Erfenis. Slavernijverleden in de kunst’ [Shared Heritage. History of slavery in art]

July 17, 2013 at 3:57 pm (A Close Look) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Twenty artists participate in Gedeelde Erfenis’. They come from or live in Suriname, Curacao, Denmark, Panama and the Netherlands. They represent different generations. They all have their own history. They make use of various media. A colorful group, which by itself already results in great variety. Variety in approach, perception and visual results. Consciously or subconsciously, the exhibition raises the question about how divided that shared past is being looked at.

Frank Creton remains closest to the gruesome aspects of reality in his figurative paintings: the poor treatment of the slaves. On a slightly abstracted canvas, Runny Margarita shifts that reality slightly by confronting a frightened overseer with the ghosts of killed slaves. The photographic works of Brett Russel (also on Twitter, and interesting interview) distance themselves in an ironic way. In Rode 2 he portrays a house slave. Vain, well conscious of his higher status, overly decked out, against a colorful, artificial background which is reminiscent of traditional photo studios that use  dream world wallpaper. Nardo Brudet (also on Twitter) goes one step further in the photographic work Happy Ending. He shows a happy black family which keeps slaves as well. The house slave in his picture is white. Staging and theme remind me of Yinka Shonibare (also on Twitter), the British/Nigerian artist.

Brett Russel, ‘Rode 2’, 2012 | PHOTO Courtesy artists ‘Gedeelde Erfenis’

Brett Russel, ‘Rode 2’, 2012 | PHOTO Courtesy artists ‘Gedeelde Erfenis’

In her work Sara Blokland (also on Facebook) often focuses on the way in which people are represented. In her  Representation of a Family she prints family photos on expensive looking tableware. She presents it like an installation in a china cabinet. With this she not only makes a play of the way in which blacks were displayed to the public in the past – as public entertainment – but also of the way in which Western museums exhibit ‘colonial’ objects. The ceramic heads of Helen Martina denounce the prejudice among many whites, that all blacks look alike. “You can’t tell one from another.” Many representations therefore comply with that cliché. In the Rodchenko-like photo montages of Henny Overbeek the portrayal of the black man as being only out for sex and thus by definition unfaithful, seems to be the theme.

In her mixed media-works Patricia Kaersenhout shows, on the one hand, the wealth of black culture (in the fabrics for example), but on the other hand she also wants to draw attention to the vulnerability of the blacks. An illustration of the dualism of a black woman born in the Netherlands?

Carla Kranendonk and Renée Koldewijn each in their own way, express their admiration for the black woman. The first, places her at the center in large collages. She finds herself surrounded by pictures of black heroes – men – but she in no way gives the impression of being affected by this. Koldewijn chooses to make colorful little statuettes of women, who, through the way in which they have folded their traditional headscarves, communicate amongst each other in a language that cannot be understood by outsiders. It would not surprise me if the figurines were also an ironic answer to the prejudice confirming  Aunt Jemima-like figures which have for a long time appeared in advertisements and which are still being sold to tourists. In a triptych Iris Kensmil has painted three black women in an expressionistic style, with lots of green, as if they have to be absorbed by their natural surroundings. Female slaves whose freedom was bought, who each in her own way accomplished something, that in Iris’s eyes, makes them heroes. [Note Rob Perrée: these works of Iris Kensmil were indeed made within the framework of ‘Gedeelde Erfenis’, but they are displayed solely in the Schuttersgalerij of the Amsterdam Museum (also on Facebook and Twitter).]

Renée Koldewijn, ‘Talking Heads’, 2013 | PHOTO Courtesy artists ‘Gedeelde Erfenis’

Renée Koldewijn, ‘Talking Heads’, 2013 | PHOTO Courtesy artists ‘Gedeelde Erfenis’

Iris Kensmil, 'Kapitein 2', 2009-2013 | PHOTO  Gert Jan van Rooij

Iris Kensmil, ‘Kapitein 2’, 2009-2013
| PHOTO Gert Jan van Rooij

Remy Jungerman (an interesting interview in UPRISING NEWS), Ken Doorson and Jeannette Ehlers (also on Twitter and an interesting interview in UPRISING NEWS) portray black resistance heroes. The first made screen-prints in red, white and blue of a picture of his ancestor Broos. He thus refers implicitly to his double identity. Doorson uses dramatic colors to give his hero Boni a characteristic and valiant head. Ehlers shows, through the Haitian Toussaint, how successful a revolt can be. All three artists have chosen a hero who could be a hero because Winti spirits offered him protection.

Remy Jungerman, ‘Captain Broos’, 2007 | PHOTO Courtesy artists ‘Gedeelde Erfenis’

Remy Jungerman, ‘Captain Broos’, 2007 | PHOTO Courtesy artists ‘Gedeelde Erfenis’

Another form of revolt appears in the collage-like works of Hector Raphaela. In it he suggests that music served as a secret language.  With it slaves could build or maintain their own culture. By opting for loose image elements on a monochromatic surface, Raphaela has succeeded in visualizing the improvisational character of music.

Hector Ceferino Raphaela, untitled, 2009 | PHOTO Courtesy artists ‘Gedeelde Erfenis’

Hector Ceferino Raphaela, untitled, 2009 | PHOTO Courtesy artists ‘Gedeelde Erfenis’

Both Antonio Guzman (also on Twitter) and George Struikelblok went in search of their own DNA. Guzman photographed the door of the fort in Ghana through which blacks were herded to be taken away. In his works he wants to show that that door can also symbolize coming home, being proud of your roots. Struikelblok comes home in a totally different way. In a moving painting of two black shadows separated by blood splatters, he proves that he is much more than an artist who paints somewhat interchangeable, template-like, colorful canvases. He comes home in an artistic sense.

Antonio Guzman, ‘Susa and the Door’, Aguadulce, Panama, 2009 | PHOTO Courtesy artists ‘Gedeelde Erfenis’

Antonio Guzman, ‘Susa and the Door’, Aguadulce, Panama, 2009 | PHOTO Courtesy artists ‘Gedeelde Erfenis’

George Struikelblok, ‘Gelijke’, 2012 | PHOTO Courtesy artists ‘Gedeelde Erfenis’

George Struikelblok, ‘Gelijke’, 2012 | PHOTO Courtesy artists ‘Gedeelde Erfenis’

How diverse, how layered and how individual can black be? In the video work Atlantic Transformerz, Charl Landvreugd (also on Facebook and on Twitter) illustrates that by letting black heads appear and disappear. The changes are accompanied by penetrating techno-music.

Charl Landvreugd, ‘Atlantic Transformerz’, 2010  | PHOTO Courtesy artists ‘Gedeelde Erfenis’

Charl Landvreugd, ‘Atlantic Transformerz’, 2010 | PHOTO Courtesy artists ‘Gedeelde Erfenis’

At the beginning of the exhibition stands a sculpture by Tirzo Martha (an interesting interview in UPRISING NEWS). A traditional, wooden, African sculpture with combs stuck into it. A critical commentary on the blacks who cling to the clichéd image of their past: slavery. In fact Martha brings down those who continue to see themselves as victims and refuse to believe in themselves, in what they themselves can do and what they are.

Tirzo Martha, ‘The Afro-Healing’, 2012 | PHOTO Courtesy artists ‘Gedeelde Erfenis’

Tirzo Martha, ‘The Afro-Healing’, 2012 | PHOTO Courtesy artists ‘Gedeelde Erfenis’

This exhibition clearly shows that a shared heritage does not equal a shared opinion of that heritage. It also shows that engagement and visual art don’t have to bite each other.

Gedeelde Erfenis. Slavernijverleden in de Kunst (also on Facebook) is open up until August 31st in CBK Zuidoost, Amsterdam Zuidoost, the Netherlands.

When: June 20-August 31, 2013. Opening hours: Tue-Wed 11:00-17:00, Thu 11:00 am-20:00, Fri 11:00 am-17:00, Sat 10:00-17:00

Where: CBK Zuidoost, Anton de Komplein 120, Amsterdam. the Netherlands

The opening of this exhibition is a part of the program line of Culture 1102, ie Imagine IC, CBK Zuidoost and Bijlmer Parktheater. Click here for the full program.

From September 12th thru October 20th the exhibition continues in the Kunstenlab, Deventer, the Netherlands (also on Facebook).

TEXT Rob Perrée, Amsterdam, June 2013

The original Dutch version of this article previously appeared in the local Surinamese newspaper de Ware Tijd of June 29th 2013.

Rob Perrée works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of the Dutch art magazine Kunstbeeld. His website: http://robperree.com.

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld

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Elsewhere – George Struikelblok in IDB exhibition

August 10, 2012 at 1:56 pm (Elsewhere) (, , , , )

Artwork of Surinamese visual artist George Struikelblok is currently included in an art exhibition of the IDB Cultural Center in Washington DC in the USA. This exhibition of art from the art collection of the IDB features work from major artists from Latin America and the Caribbean, including George Struikelblok. With the exhibition Art in Society: The Power of Culture, the IDB celebrates the 20th anniversary of the IDB Cultural Center. The exhibition is open from August 1 to September 28, from Monday thru Friday, 11 am-6 pm in the IDB Cultural Center Gallery, 1300 NY Avenue NW, Washington DC, USA. The flyer for the exhibition can be downloaded here.

Invitation ‘Art in Society. The Power of Culture’

Not only is this early work, ‘I miss you’, from 1999, by George Struikelblok featured in the exhibition, it is also purchased by the IDB for their collection. It is the first Surinamese work ever bought by the IDB.

George Struikelblok, ‘I miss you’, oil & acrylic paint on canvas, 210x150cm, 1999 | PHOTO Collection George Struikelblok

The IDB Cultural Center has an excellent reputation for high caliber art exhibitions in the Washington, DC metro area as well as internationally, having won the 2010 Washington, DC Mayor’s Award for Visionary Leadership in the Arts.

Established in 1992, the IDB Cultural Center and has two primary objectives:

1) contribute to social development by providing grants to small-scale cultural projects that have positive social impact in the Region

2) showcase the artistic expressions of the IDB member countries, with emphasis on Latin America and the Caribbean, through cultural programs that bring understanding between the Region and the rest of the world

The IDB Cultural Center Exhibitions Program and the Inter-American Concert, Lecture and Film Series stimulate dialogue and offer greater knowledge of the creativity of the Americas.  The Cultural Development Program funds projects for technical training, revival of cultural heritage and community values, and supports artistic initiatives. The IDB Art Collection, acquired over five decades, is managed by the Cultural Center and embodies the Bank’s mission to invest in the Region’s artists; and travelling exhibitions promote diversity and integration among nations.

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