An Eye for Art: Kurt Nahar, ”

July 5, 2015 at 2:30 pm (An Eye for Art) (, , , , , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed an informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week he talks about ‘Untitled 11’, mixed media collage on paper, 13 cm wide x 23 cm high, 2011, by Kurt Nahar.

Kurt Nahar, 'Untitled 6', mixed media collage on paper, 13,5 w x 23 h cm, 2011 - USD 95 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, ‘Untitled 6′, mixed media collage on paper, 13,5 w x 23 h cm, 2011 – USD 95 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Collage may seem like an easy medium. A stack of old magazines, a pair of scissors – and even those are not really necessary –, some regular craft glue and you are good to go. Others provide the images and the only thing left to do for you as an artist, is to create a composition with them. You are not even at risk of getting your hands dirty.

This untitled work from 2011 by Kurt Nahar proves however, that a good collage requires more than that.

The whole already delivers a strong image. It immediately attracts attention. The torn edges add a vulnerable note, while the man – is it a man? – rather seems to exude strength; a tension field that intrigues.

Different parts of the work contain similar contradictions. The transparent area to the left must be by Michelangelo, a type of house artist from the Catholic Church. The festive bottom part refers to the Swiss Guard of that same church. The chubby baby has been torn from the arms of the classical mother-with-child. What does the armor have to do with it? That radiates aggression. In reality the Swiss Guard wears a type of operetta helmet. One that is more likely to make you laugh, with its red crest.

Is ‘protection’ that which the various elements have in common?

From other work by Kurt Nahar it is evident that he has a strong aversion to violence, especially to senseless violence. He wants us to take note of figures who use their positions of power to legitimize violence.

Is this work then a portrayal of ‘how to protect oneself’ or is it the other way around, ‘what does protection embody?’ A sensitive shoulder, an open visor, a child that has been torn from his mother, and an army that closely resembles a tourist attraction.

I tend towards the latter, but the artist does not provide an answer. He only makes the viewer aware of the subject matter. The impact of the image alone causes you to think about it.

While many of Nahar’s collages are outright about politics, in this work more attention is given to the form and the message is merely implicit.

TEXT Rob Perrée, Amsterdam, June 2015

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2015

An article by Marieke Visser about Kurt Nahar was recently (April 7, 2015) published on the website of Africanah.org.

Want to see this and other work of Kurt Nahar ‘up close and personal’? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Steenbakkerijstraat 30, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Kurt Nahar please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/kurtnahar.

Print

More work by Kurt Nahar available in Readytex Art Gallery:

This work featured in a previous edition of ‘An Eye for Art’:

Kurt Nahar, 'Untitled', mixed media collage on paper, 20x29cm, 2011  - USD 125 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, ‘Untitled’, mixed media collage on paper, 20x29cm, 2011 – USD 125 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, 'Untitled 36', mixed media collage on paper, 27x18cm, 2011  - USD 125 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, ‘Untitled 36′, mixed media collage on paper, 27x18cm, 2011 – USD 125 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, 'This is not a pig', mixed media on paper, 47x49cm, 2012  - USD 500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, ‘This is not a pig’, mixed media on paper, 47x49cm, 2012 – USD 500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, 'Revo no, Pussy Si 14', mixed media collage on paper, 19x26cm, 2011  - USD 150 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, ‘Revo no, Pussy Si 14′, mixed media collage on paper, 19x26cm, 2011 – USD 150 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, 'Revo no, Pussy Si 5', mixed media collage on paper, 19x26cm, 2011  - USD 150 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, ‘Revo no, Pussy Si 5′, mixed media collage on paper, 19x26cm, 2011 – USD 150 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, 'Peaceful Visions I', mixed media  on hardboard, 60x90cm, 2008  - USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, ‘Peaceful Visions I’, mixed media on hardboard, 60x90cm, 2008 – USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, 'On the wall', mixed media collage on canvas, 67x81cm, 2011  - USD 575 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, ‘On the wall’, mixed media collage on canvas, 67x81cm, 2011 – USD 575 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, 'Kwakoe dada', mixed media on paper, 28x37.5cm, 2010  - USD 130 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, ‘Kwakoe dada’, mixed media on paper, 28×37.5cm, 2010 – USD 130 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, 'Het leven voor niets in een zothuis 8', mixed media collage on paper, 21x29cm, 2011  - USD 175 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, ‘Het leven voor niets in een zothuis 8′, mixed media collage on paper, 21x29cm, 2011 – USD 175 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, 'El mundo de los muertos', mixed media collage on paper, 19x28cm, 2009  - USD 150 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, ‘El mundo de los muertos’, mixed media collage on paper, 19x28cm, 2009 – USD 150 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, 'Dada en de appel I', mixed media  on wood, 30x125x3cm, 2008  - USD 250 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, ‘Dada en de appel I’, mixed media on wood, 30x125x3cm, 2008 – USD 250 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, 'Appeltje voor de dorst', applied art product, mixed media on canvas, 37x37x8cm, 2011  - USD 100 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kurt Nahar, ‘Appeltje voor de dorst’, applied art product, mixed media on canvas, 37x37x8cm, 2011 – USD 100 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

LOGO eye for art

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on July 6, 2015 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on July 2, 2015.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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Surinamese art with magic powers

July 5, 2015 at 12:12 pm (A Close Look, Elsewhere, Meanwhile ...) (, , , , , , , , , , , )

The turning point was a visit to the family altar of his mother in the Surinamese rain-forest. That was in 2005, tells Surinamese-Dutch artist Remy Jungerman (on Facebook) in a video in his exhibition. The reason for the visit was the passing away of his father. But that altar, that physical location with its winti-rituals, right at that moment, meant so much to Jungerman, that he decided to break with his earlier work. ‘This is what I really am,’ he says in the video, ‘Something I have been initiated in’.

Remy Jungerman, 'FODU. Composition 24', (detail of a wall installation consisting of 24 panels for the Projects Room, 410x270x35cm, wood, textile, kaolin (pemba), 2015 / PHOTO Femke DIx, 2015

Remy Jungerman, ‘FODU. Composition 24′, (detail of a wall installation consisting of 24 panels for the Projects Room, 410x270x35cm, wood, textile, kaolin (pemba), 2015 / PHOTO Femke DIx, 2015

Video shown in the exhibition Crossing the water:

What that turning point led to, can be seen in his exhibition in the Haags Gemeentemuseum: six sculptural installations, of large geometric shapes. It is mostly squares that can easily go along with the art history further down in this museum – Mondriaan, Rietveld. But they also have patterns that Jungerman, who himself grew up in a Maroon community, borrowed from the rich visual traditions of the Maroons in the interior. In the 20’s of the previous century, these descendants from the run-away slaves, developed fabric with all kinds of geometric patterns. They are beautiful and Jungerman collected them in his studio. But he wanted more. He thus enrolled at the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam. He studied there with the objective to bring winti-traditions together with those other cultures that excelled in graphic abstractions in the 20’s: the European avant-gardes. Subsequently he named his exhibition Crossing the Water. About bridging oceans.

Mixing cultures is no mathematical formula and Jungerman knows that. His sculptures therefore represent primarily himself, his aesthetics, and his graphic predilections. According to his own insights he combines wood with checkered cloths, tablecloth plaids, Dutch Wax patterns, Maroon designs. A monochromatic blue panel à la Yves Klein hangs next to frames that are reminiscent of how Daan van Golden elevated ordinary handkerchiefs to art. A type of Mondriaan at the kitchen table.

But that perspective by no means makes it insignificant. Because what Jungerman especially does also, is approach his work with the ritualistic point of view from the winti-religion. The white that he paints with is kaolin, a type of clay used by winti to cover their skin and their African sculptures to guard against evil influences. Covered with this, his art works are protected. They are as a matter of fact, named after rituals: Fodu, Initiands, Obeah. He alternates the flat squares with cubes, one of which holds a jar that is wrapped in red thread, which clearly shows the meticulous way of working. An abstract work of art indeed, but also a small altar. And for a moment Jungerman takes us along, in our thoughts, to the altar of his mother.

He continuously brings elements together. On occasion, in an altar block with stoneware gin bottles next to rum bottles, it looks somewhat contrived – a bit too Benetton, colors hand in hand – but for the rest the combinations come together naturally in his unique sense of beauty, with reverence and spirituality. And the beauty is: spirituality is exactly that which Mondriaan and his associates strived for. Many visitors will forget that when seeing those solemnly hung abstract works of art in the strict museum halls, but therein lays a cosmic aim for higher things as well. With color and life Jungerman brings back that look of Mondriaan’s aesthetics. Bridging oceans, that mission has been completely successful.

Exhibition: Remy Jungerman (also on Facebook), Crossing the Water, April 11 until August 16, 2015, in Haags Gemeentemuseum. Stadhouderslaan 41, the Hague, the Netherlands. Tuesday-Sunday 11:00 am-7:00 pm.

More information about this artist can be found on his website: www.remyjungerman.com and on his Facebook-page.

Invitation 'Crossing the Water'

Invitation ‘Crossing the Water’

During the opening of 'Crossing the Water' Remy Jungerman had an art conversation with Mondriaan-expert Hans Janssen, Haags Gemeentemuseum, April 11, 2015 / PHOTO Femke Dix, 2015

During the opening of ‘Crossing the Water’ Remy Jungerman had an art conversation with Mondriaan-expert Hans Janssen, Haags Gemeentemuseum, April 11, 2015 / PHOTO Femke Dix, 2015

From May-July 2015 Remy Jungerman was invited by Marc Straus Gallery for a residency in New York City. On July 19, 2015, from 11:00am-18:00pm you’re cordially invited to the Open Studio (on Facebook) to see the result from the three months residency. Where: 286 Grand Street, New York, NY 10002, USA.

Open Studio Remy Jungerman / PHOTO Courtesy Remy Jungerman

Open Studio Remy Jungerman / PHOTO Courtesy Remy Jungerman

TEXT Sandra Smets

Sandra Smets (Haarlem, 1970) is an art historian, and writes mostly about contemporary art, including art in public spaces. She has worked at the Centrum Beeldende Kunst Rotterdam for over ten years and is, since 2006, a visual arts employee at the NRC Handelsblad. She also writes for various magazines, artist catalogues and publications, about the art of the reconstruction and developments in the twentieth century. Website: www.sandrasmets.nl

This article was previously published in Dutch as ‘Surinaamse kunst met toverkracht’ in NRC Handelsblad, April 23, 2015.

NRC Handelsblad, April 23, 2015

NRC Handelsblad, April 23, 2015

PHOTOGRAPHY Femke Dix

Femke Dix (Paramaribo, 1989) is a student at the University of Applied Photography in Amsterdam. She started making photographs in 2005 and after studying something else it became the job of her dreams after all. In a year’s time she will finish her study and she will enter the field as a freelance photographer. She established Femfoto (on Facebook) in 2010 and it exists for 5 years already. She is most interested in documentary photography and she is currently working on a photographical documentary about the burial customs of the Afro-Surinamese community. Website: www.femfoto.nl 

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, June 2015

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‘Possible Paradise’, Photography by Diana Blok

June 26, 2015 at 8:14 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , )

The book 'Possible Paradise' with photos by Diana Blok & text by Annette de Vries / PHOTO COVER Diana Blok,2003

The book ‘Possible Paradise’ with photos by Diana Blok & text by Annette de Vries / PHOTO COVER Diana Blok,2003

Forgotten paradise

Sometimes the stacks fall over.

Then I really need to start doing something about my excessive book collection.

This time, a book fell out that I had forgotten about.

Possible Paradise from Diana Blok.

An artist from Uruguay who has lived in the Netherlands for a long time.

It is a photographic report of her visit to Suriname.

From over ten years ago already.

A wonderful collection of photos of primarily people, but also buildings and locations.

Beautiful people, picturesque buildings, special locations.

Those photos have already seen the light once in an exhibition.

In CBK Zuidoost.

A logical place.

In Suriname they have never been shown.

Even the book has never made the crossing before.

The photographs are probably in one of those cold grey metal storage cabinets now.

Forgotten, abandoned.

The books are collecting dust on the shelf of a publisher.

And in my overly high stack of books.

There should be something that can be done about that.

That book has not made its visible fall to the ground for nothing.

It must surely be a sign.

A sign that wants to be seen/heard.

From the 'Possible Paradise' series / PHOTO Diana Blok,2003

From the ‘Possible Paradise’ series / PHOTO Diana Blok,2003

From the 'Possible Paradise' series / PHOTO Diana Blok,2003

From the ‘Possible Paradise’ series / PHOTO Diana Blok,2003

From the 'Possible Paradise' series / PHOTO Diana Blok,2003

From the ‘Possible Paradise’ series / PHOTO Diana Blok,2003

From the 'Possible Paradise' series / PHOTO Diana Blok,2003

From the ‘Possible Paradise’ series / PHOTO Diana Blok,2003

From the 'Possible Paradise' series / PHOTO Diana Blok,2003

From the ‘Possible Paradise’ series / PHOTO Diana Blok,2003

From the 'Possible Paradise' series / PHOTO Diana Blok,2003

From the ‘Possible Paradise’ series / PHOTO Diana Blok,2003

TEXT Rob Perrée

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

PHOTOS Diana Blok

Previously published in digital art magazine SAX Sranan Art Xposed, January 2015, nr. 10

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Tembe Tori, June 2015, number 9 has arrived

June 18, 2015 at 10:29 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , )

In April 2012 the first edition of Tembe Tori was published. One page, printed with black ink on both sides, with news about former mining town Moengo. During a few months Tembe Tori was distributed regularly in the Moengo community and in Paramaribo. A good way to reach the people in Moengo, a small town in the Marowijne district in Suriname, where artist Marcel Pinas has established the Kibii Foundation, the Tembe Art Studio, the Contemporary Art Museum Moengo and the Marowijne Art Park. Although Tembe Tori served its purpose well, the 9th edition just never came … Until June 2015.

Tembe Tori, number 9 is now a fact. And starting with this edition, the newsletter has four pages and is printed in full color. In addition, Tembe Tori is currently also available digitally so people anywhere in the world can read up on what’s happening in Moengo. Available in Dutch only, Tembe Tori will be published monthly until at least September when the Moengo Festival will be held for the 3d time.

Distribution points:

Tori Oso (Facebook), Frederik Derbystraat 76, Paramaribo // Zus & Zo (Facebook), Grote Combéweg 13a, Paramaribo // Readytex Art Gallery (Facebook), Steenbakkerijstraat 30, Paramaribo // Moengo Festival-kantoor (PAS-gebouw) (Facebook), Verlengde Keizerstraat 92, Paramaribo // Tembe Art Studio, Moengo
Tembe Tori 9, page 1

Tembe Tori 9, June 2015, number 9, page 1

Tembe Tori 9, page 2

Tembe Tori 9, June 2015, number 9, page 2

Tembe Tori 9, page 3

Tembe Tori 9, June 2015, number 9, page 3

Tembe Tori 9, page 4

Tembe Tori 9, June 2015, number 9, page 4

BACK ISSUES: Number 0, 6 & 9

Tembe Tori, number 0, front

Tembe Tori, April 26, 2012, number 0, front

Tembe Tori, number 0, back

Tembe Tori, April 26, 2012, number 0, back

Tembe Tori, November 9, 2012, number 6

Tembe Tori, June 2015, number 9

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An Eye for Art: Sunil Puljhun – ‘Dans 2’ [Dance 2]

June 17, 2015 at 10:06 pm (An Eye for Art) (, , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed an informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week he talks about ‘Dans 2’ [Dance 2], mixed media on paper, 48 cm wide x 65 cm high, 2014, by Sunil Puljhun.

Sunil Puljhun, 'Dans 2' [Dance 2], mixed media on paper, 48x65cm, 2014 - USD 155 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sunil Puljhun, ‘Dans 2′ [Dance 2], mixed media on paper, 48x65cm, 2014 – USD 450 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

It was a surprise to me, this work. I know Sunil Puljhun (Paramaribo, 1978) as an artist who makes dark and sometimes also gloomy works. A lot of black and gray with here and there a patch of light.

Those works are also dark regarding content: abuse, violence and power are recurring themes.

This work seems to indicate a drastic turnaround. In and partially hidden behind a jumble of cheerful light colors and shapes, is a dancing blue figure. It’s not just the figure that’s whirling, but the shapes are whirling along. Who encourages what or who encourages whom is not entirely clear. It is a cheerful painting.

That proves to be a misunderstanding. Four years ago Puljhun lost his father. As the eldest son it was his responsibility to decide how his father would be laid to rest. In his culture this means taking care of the rituals associated with a Hindu burial. Rituals he knew hardly anything about. He started studying all kinds of rituals and almost inevitably also came across dance, a ritual in which movement and facial expressions have substantive and symbolic meaning. At the same time, during this tragic event surrounded by rituals, he was confronted with himself: who am I really? What does it mean to have Hinduism as my religion? Whereas his dark work is generally speaking about the harsh world out there, in this case it is all about him. That requires a different form also. That is how the trusted black starts making way for color.

I called ‘Dans 2’ a painting. That is not entirely correct. Puljhun has been engaged in digitally altering images for a while now, and in this case the paintbrush has gotten the company of the computer. They work together harmoniously.

It is not clear whether the artist will continue on this ‘light’ path. It could be an incidental step, caused by an incidental event. From it he has in any case learned that there are more options available to him when it comes to expressing himself.

TEXT Rob Perrée, Amsterdam, June 2015

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, Bahamas, 2015

Want to see this and other work of Sunil Puljhun ‘up close and personal’? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Steenbakkerijstraat 30, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Sunil Puljhun please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/sunilpuljhun.

Print

More work by Sunil Puljhun available in Readytex Art Gallery:

Sunil Puljhun, 'Dans 1' [Dance 1], mixed media on paper, 48x65cm, 2014 - USD 155 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sunil Puljhun, ‘Dans 1′ [Dance 1], mixed media on paper, 48x65cm, 2014 – USD 155 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sunil Puljhun, ‘Papegaai V’ [Parrot V], mixed media on paper, 47x63cm, 2012 – USD 155 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sunil Puljhun, 'Untitled 2', mixed media on paper, 47x63cm, 2011  - From: 'The Weight of Darkness'  - USD 550 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sunil Puljhun, ‘Untitled 2′, mixed media on paper, 47x63cm, 2011 – From: ‘The Weight of Darkness’ – USD 550 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

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John Lie A Fo – ‘La Verticale de l’Équateur’ in Habitation Clément, Martinique

June 13, 2015 at 1:14 pm (Elsewhere, Meanwhile ...) (, , , , , , , )

Banner 'La verticale de l’Équateur’

What: La Verticale de l’Équateur [The vertical of the equator], a solo exhibition by John Lie A Fo 

When: June 5-July 12, 2015

Where: Habitation Clément (also on Facebook), Martinique

John Lie A Fo in front of his work / PHOTO Courtesy John Lie A Fo

John Lie A Fo in front of his work / PHOTO Courtesy John Lie A Fo

The exhibition, which is named La Verticale de l’Équateur, opened in Habitation Clément in Martinique on June 5th, 2015. The exhibition is a collaborative effort of the Fondation Clément (also on Facebook) in Martinique and Anne-Marie Pichard-Libert of Galerie l’Encadrier from Cayenne, French Guiana.

John Lie A Fo, 'Orion' / PHOTO Courtesy John Lie A Fo

John Lie A Fo, ‘Orion’ / PHOTO Courtesy John Lie A Fo

In La Verticale de l’Équateur John Lie A Fo presents twenty large canvases in acrylic paint, which are as we are used to seeing from him, steeped in spirituality. They make reference to the relationship between the spirit world and that of man, and as usual they attest to the artist’s pride in, and fascination with the traditions and the rituals of the different cultures in his home country, Suriname. 

John Lie A Fo, 'Jaran Kepang' / PHOTO Courtesy John Lie A Fo

John Lie A Fo, ‘Jaran Kepang’ / PHOTO Courtesy John Lie A Fo

In his creation the artist stays true to himself and his expressions, but he does choose to use titles that are more universal. For the occasion of the exhibition a beautiful catalogue has been published, which is also named La Verticale de l’Équateur.

John Lie A Fo, 'The Red Release' / PHOTO Courtesy John Lie A Fo

John Lie A Fo, ‘The Red Release’ / PHOTO Courtesy John Lie A Fo

John Lie A Fo, 'It's still going on' / PHOTO Courtesy John Lie A Fo

John Lie A Fo, ‘It’s still going on’ / PHOTO Courtesy John Lie A Fo

Good to know: Readytex Art Gallery also has work in stock by John Lie A Fo. Just visit the gallery in Steenbakkerijstraat 30, Paramaribo, Suriname. Or take a look on the website.

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An Eye for Art: Sri Irodikromo – ‘Corn Rows I’

June 4, 2015 at 12:05 am (Uncategorized) (, , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed an informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week he talks about ‘Corn Rows I’, mixed media on canvas, 66 cm wide x 70 cm high, 2014, by Sri Irodikromo.

Sri Irodikromo, ‘Corn Rows II′, mixed media on canvas, 66x70cm, 2014 – USD 700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sri Irodikromo, ‘Corn Rows II′, mixed media on canvas, 66x70cm, 2014 – USD 700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

A regal portrait. This is how you portray dignity, this is what style looks like, this is what you call class. On the one hand this is due to the classic profile of the woman, corresponding to the classical ideals of beauty, much like the profiles of women in Egyptian tombs, but on the other hand the headdress has much to do with it.

At the same time the decorations on her head cause an enigma. It looks as though only her head is adorned, but the decorative elements continue throughout the work. Around the head they are just more accentuated, the colors are sharper, flaming almost. Towards the edges of the work they gradually disappear into nothingness.

Where they originate from remains unclear to me. It looks like a fusion of classical ornaments and Caribbean motifs. Maybe they are just made up and they are only intended to suggest those references. Do their origins really matter? What stands out is that a large part of the ornaments are rimmed with an extra lick of orange paint. It seems put on top of it. By doing so Sri Irodikromo strengthens the layers, the depth that the portrait already has. Moreover, these accents literally give luster to the whole. They play a major role in the color play that is so artfully played out in this work. From large contrasts to smooth transitions. From disappearing to appearing.

Titles are not meant to explain, but to give hints. ‘Corn Rows I’ doesn’t really seem like a title that likes to hint. Rows of corn? What should I think of that? Does the woman have something to do with planting corn? She is much too stately for that. Does the title then have something to do with hair that has been braided onto the head after all?

I have to make do with the certainty of a beautiful work with an uncertain meaning that partially derives its beauty from the mystery that surrounds it. A present-day sibling of the Mona Lisa?

 

TEXT Rob Perrée, Florence, May 2015

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld

Want to see this and other work of Sri Irodikromo ‘up close and personal’? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Steenbakkerijstraat 30, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Sri Irodikromo please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/sri.

Print

More work by Sri Irodikromo available in Readytex Art Gallery:

Sri Irodikromo, ‘Corn Rows II′, mixed media on canvas, 70x70cm, 2015 – USD 700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sri Irodikromo, ‘Corn Rows II′, mixed media on canvas, 70x70cm, 2015 – USD 700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sri Irodikromo, 'Adjuba (vlijtige)' [Adjuba (industrious)], ceramics, 18x33x15cm, 2008 - USD 400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sri Irodikromo, ‘Adjuba (vlijtige)’ [Adjuba (industrious)], ceramics, 18x33x15cm, 2008 – USD 400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sri Irodikromo, 'Baka sei', mixed media on canvas, 68x114cm, 2011  - USD 900 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sri Irodikromo, ‘Baka sei’, mixed media on canvas, 68x114cm, 2011 – USD 900 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sri Irodikromo, 'Pangi', mixed media on canvas, 53x77cm, 2012  - USD 700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sri Irodikromo, ‘Pangi’, mixed media on canvas, 53x77cm, 2012 – USD 700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sri Irodikromo, 'Blauw Misi', mixed media on canvas, 70x100cm, 2013  - USD 800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sri Irodikromo, ‘Blauw Misi’, mixed media on canvas, 70x100cm, 2013 – USD 800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sri Irodikromo, bloc note cover, 23/50 - USD 120 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sri Irodikromo, bloc note cover, 23/50 – USD 120 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sri Irodikromo, bloc note cover, 23/50 - USD 120 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sri Irodikromo, bloc note cover, 23/50 – USD 120 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sri Irodikromo, bloc note cover, 23/50 - USD 120 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sri Irodikromo, bloc note cover, 23/50 – USD 120 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

LOGO eye for art

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on June 3, 2015 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on June 3, 2015.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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An Eye for Art: Kenneth Flijders – ‘Untitled 2′

May 20, 2015 at 5:43 pm (An Eye for Art) (, , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed an informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week he talks about ‘Untitled 2’, mixed media on paper, 56 cm wide x 42 cm high, 2013, from Kenneth Flijders.

Kenneth Flijders, 'Untitled 2', mixed media on paper, 50 cm wide x 42 cm high, 2013 - USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders, ‘Untitled 2′, mixed media on paper, 50 cm wide x 42 cm high, 2013 – USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

The first association that comes to mind is an ancient petroglyph. Somewhere in a deep cave in France. This is most likely due to the earthy colors.

The striking thing is that Kenneth Flijders (Paramaribo, 1956) usually paints from reality, figuratively, with colors that are inspired by that reality, but which are inclined to add some extra sparkle, and to exaggerate a little. These often comprise of everyday scenery, scenes from a story, anecdotes.

This work is far removed from reality. It looks like a combination of shapes, or rather a jumble of shapes and lines. They overlap, they connect with each other, and they seek each other out. I consciously use words suggestive of activity, because the whole makes a moving and active impression. This is enhanced by the layers, the suggestion of depth in foreground as well as in background, by the whimsicality of the lines and the various gradations of brown.

It is also possible to look at this work as a top view. Then something remarkable happens. Then those two dark shapes to the left of the surface could be people who contact each other in one way or another. A greeting? A conflict? Shapes become bodies, lines become arms and legs. Your own imagination then takes hold of the work and a story might yet emerge. The suspected abstraction must then perhaps backtrack after all.

Kenneth Flijders says that he likes to experiment, with the material, with the style and with the content.

This work shows how valuable the result of such an experiment can be. The canvas holds an undeniable attraction and it intrigues because it is open to interpretation.

TEXT Rob Perrée, Florence, May 2015

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2015

Want to see this and other work of Kenneth Flijders ‘up close and personal’? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Steenbakkerijstraat 30, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Kenneth Flijders please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/kennethflijders.

Print

More work by Kenneth Flijders available in Readytex Art Gallery:

Kenneth Flijders, 'Untitled I', mixed media on paper, 57 cm wide x 38 cm high, 2013 - USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders, ‘Untitled I’, mixed media on paper, 57 cm wide x 38 cm high, 2013 – USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders, 'Mamio I', acryl on canvas, 143 cm wide x 140 cm high, 2013 - USD 1200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders, ‘Mamio I’, acryl on canvas, 143 cm wide x 140 cm high, 2013 – USD 1200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

From a series of three: Kenneth Flijders, 'Every day a drop creates us 3', mixed media on paper, 100 cm wide x 80 cm high, 2013 - USD 350 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

From a series of three: Kenneth Flijders, ‘Every day a drop creates us 3′, mixed media on paper, 100 cm wide x 80 cm high, 2013 – USD 350 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders, 'Untitled V', screenprint, 63 cm wide x 46 cm high, 2010 - USD 225 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders, ‘Untitled V’, screenprint, 63 cm wide x 46 cm high, 2010 – USD 225 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders, 'I shall call you Adam', mixed media on hardboard, 55 cm wide x 125 cm high x 2.5 cm deep, 2011 - USD 750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders, ‘I shall call you Adam’, mixed media on hardboard, 55 cm wide x 125 cm high x 2.5 cm deep, 2011 – USD 750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders, 'Untitled 5', mixed media on paper, 27.5 cm wide x 34.5 cm high, 2012 - USD 200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders, ‘Untitled 5′, mixed media on paper, 27.5 cm wide x 34.5 cm high, 2012 – USD 200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders 'brokopondo' work was chosen as a design for one of the art wraps, a unique product from the Readytex Art Gallery, 180x100cm, 100% cotton / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kenneth Flijders ‘brokopondo’ work was chosen as a design for one of the art wraps, a unique product from the Readytex Art Gallery, 180x100cm, 100% cotton / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

LOGO eye for art

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on May 20, 2015 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on May 20, 2015.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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An Eye for Art: Rinaldo Klas – ‘Composition′

May 6, 2015 at 11:49 am (An Eye for Art) (, , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed an informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week he talks about ‘Composition’, acrylics on canvas, 126 cm wide x 110 cm high, 2015, from Rinaldo Klas.

Rinaldo Klas, ‘Composition’, acrylics on canvas, 126 cm wide x 110 cm high, 2015 - USD 1400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Rinaldo Klas, ‘Composition’, acrylics on canvas, 126 cm wide x 110 cm high, 2015 – USD 1400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

This recent work by Rinaldo Klas (Moengo, 1954) surprised me. In recent years his work was generally figurative. They were based on reality, albeit somewhat stylized. The environment surrounding the people or the animals was abstracted. You could venture a guess at the identity, but it was not clearly given. There was often a social message hidden within. For Klas for example, nature, the preservation of nature, is an important theme.

This work is completely different. My first association is an explosion of shapes and colors. This assumes a high degree of coincidence. That is not so. There is after all a reason why Klas calls it a ‘Composition’. Those apparently random shapes and colors have been composed indeed. The colorful, whimsical shapes disperse from a center – black hole? – in a shape resembling a star. They partially overlap and at the same time they manage strengthen each other. The image is full of movement. Not in the least because the strokes and the splatters of paint are engaged in some sort of battle. Was Pollock looking on over his shoulder? Even though on the whole it seems abstract, there are still enough shapes that stimulate the imagination and that can lead to interpretation. Moreover, an explosion of forms and colors can also symbolize liberation. Is it psychology of the cold soil or is it possible that Klas feels liberated because he no longer has the responsibility of the academy resting on his shoulders?

The public generally expects an artist to stick to a certain style or a specific theme. That makes looking and understanding less complicated. On the other hand however, an artist who always stays within the lines, shows very little in the way of artistic development. I suspect that in this case, Klas was trying something out. Is a painting strong when it limits itself to abstract shapes and colors?

If that was his intention, then he was indeed successful.

TEXT Rob Perrée, Amsterdam, May 2015

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2015

Want to see this and other work of Rinaldo Klas ‘up close and personal’? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Steenbakkerijstraat 30, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Rinaldo Klas please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/rinaldoklas.

Print

More work by Rinaldo Klas available in Readytex Art Gallery:

Rinaldo Klas, ‘In Space’, acrylics on canvas, 144 cm wide x 110 cm high, 2015 - USD 1500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Rinaldo Klas, ‘In Space’, acrylics on canvas, 144 cm wide x 110 cm high, 2015 – USD 1500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Rinaldo Klas, ‘Toekan’, acrylics on canvas, 60 cm wide x 80 cm high, 2015 - USD 800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Rinaldo Klas, ‘Toekan’, acrylics on canvas, 60 cm wide x 80 cm high, 2015 – USD 800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Rinaldo Klas, 'Mountains of Gold I’, acrylics on canvas, 130 cm wide x 100 cm high, 2012 - USD 1400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Rinaldo Klas, 'Goudkoorts IV’ [Gold rush IV], acrylics on canvas, 187 cm wide x 144 cm high, 2012 - USD 2250 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Rinaldo Klas, 'From the sky III’, acrylics on canvas, 130 cm wide x 100 cm high, 2012 - USD 1400 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Rinaldo Klas, 'Goudputten 18’ [Gold pits 18], acrylics on canvas, 30 cm wide x 20 cm high, 2012 - USD 200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Rinaldo Klas, 'Red Ibis’, acrylics on canvas, 50 cm wide x 50 cm high, 2014 - USD 500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

LOGO eye for art

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on May 6, 2015 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on May 6, 2015.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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Inspired – Surinamese Inspiration in South-Africa: the Nature Collages of Jon Daamen

April 28, 2015 at 1:31 pm (Inspired, Outspoken) ()

“I obtain the most beautiful colors from flower petals, the most beautiful shapes from seeds and seed pods. The seeds of the African tulip*, a large tree with red flowers, that I brought with me from Suriname, are wonderful to work with. Airy, translucent, filling and at the same time creating space and depth.”

Up

Jon Daamen, ‘Omhoog’ [Up]. Jon Daamen: “This collage is made with flower petals from roses and bougainvillea from my garden here and also with flower petals from the flamboyant that stood in our garden in Togo. Coming from Suriname are the ‘fayalobi’-flowers, the Spathodea-seeds and the ‘speldeknoppen’. And then there are also ‘fijnbos’ flowers from the most Southern part of Africa in it.” / PHOTO Niels Bastiaensen

In her studio in Tuinplaas on the South African Cape, Jon Daamen is busily experimenting. She makes two-dimensional collages from natural material and thus portrays landscapes with great atmospheres. The type of creations for which she became well known when she lived and worked in Suriname. Because of her move to South Africa, her artistry was put on the back burner for many years, until an unexpected visit to her former home country rekindled the spark. Halfway through 2014 she was briefly in Suriname for the first time in 17 years. She left with a bag filled with seeds and pods. And with a heart filled with inspiration to start making art again.

But picking the thread back up after such a long hiatus is a struggle …  She has explored Surinamese nature as few others have during the 25 years that she lived there. She is not as yet familiar with African plants; she has never before worked with them.

Zon’ (Sun) Jon Daamen: “A collage from the Surinamese days. The butterflies are from Spathodea-seeds. I found the two other materials at the Costerie creek. The collage Jon Daamen, ‘Zon’ [Sun]. Jon Daamen: "'Zon' was made years ago in Suriname. By now too old to remove the glass from it, because the leaves have become extremely fragile and brittle.”

Jon Daamen, ‘Zon’ [Sun]. Jon Daamen: “‘Zon’ was made years ago in Suriname. By now too old to remove the glass from it, because the leaves have become extremely fragile and brittle.” / PHOTO Niels Bastiaensen

“I struggle with Cape landscapes, Surinamese skies and two kinds of light. And because my work is often suggestive, a mixture of accents and emptiness, it has to be just right to be recognizable for others. The images in my mind’s eye cannot be compared to the reality of here and now. Light in Suriname falls totally different from the way it does here, because here the sun sits much lower and throws much longer shadows. In the early mornings it often looks as though everything is bathed in silver and as night falls we have a more orange-tinted light. The long shadows give a lot of depth to the landscape.”

For her African work she uses, just as she did in Suriname, seeds, pods, dried leaves of shrubs, trees and flowers.  But also ‘kapok’, tufts of horsehair that she finds in the barbed wire around her farm, feathers and insect wings. And sometimes also fish or turtle scales and the sloughed off skin of snakes, but only those that she finds, she doesn’t kill anything for it.

Jon Daamen, 'After the fires'. Jon Daamen: “This work is made with kapok in front of the clouds and termite wings in front of the water around the reeds in the foreground, both from Togo. From Suriname are the ‘speldeknoppen’ (Syngonanthus umbellatus, Eriocaulaceae-family), a Savannah plant. The stems are the fallen tree trunks, the heads are the sheep or brushes in the background, and the young whole plants stand like reeds in the foreground. For the burned down trees on the mountain face I used the tops of protea-stamens and for the mist flurries, the middle part of those same stamens. The smoke is horse hair that got stuck in my barbed wire. It is called ‘After the Fires’ because the whole has an atmosphere of a morning after the rains that extinguished the large fire of Hermanus. Two years ago, after a weekend on the farm, we drove away in the early morning completely bewildered by a fascinating landscape of blackened mountains, wisps of smoke and white clouds against a background of a lagoon flooded in silver morning light. The image is engraved in my memory and when I began working with black, silver and white, it came out automatically.”Work in progress: 'After the fires'  / PHOTO Courtesy Jon Daamen

Jon Daamen, ‘After the fires’. Jon Daamen: “This work is made with kapok in front of the clouds and termite wings in front of the water around the reeds in the foreground, both from Togo. From Suriname are the ‘speldeknoppen’ (Syngonanthus umbellatus, Eriocaulaceae-family), a Savannah plant. The stems are the fallen tree trunks, the heads are the sheep or brushes in the background, and the young whole plants stand like reeds in the foreground. For the burned down trees on the mountain face I used the tops of protea-stamens and for the mist flurries, the middle part of those same stamens. The smoke is horse hair that got stuck in my barbed wire. It is called ‘After the Fires’ because the whole has an atmosphere of a morning after the rains that extinguished the large fire of Hermanus. Two years ago, after a weekend on the farm, we drove away in the early morning completely bewildered by a fascinating landscape of blackened mountains, wisps of smoke and white clouds against a background of a lagoon flooded in silver morning light. The image is engraved in my memory and when I began working with black, silver and white, it came out automatically.”Work in progress: ‘After the fires’ / PHOTO Niels Bastiaensen

Work in progress: 'After the fires' / PHOTO Niels Bastiaensen

Work in progress: ‘After the fires’ / PHOTO Courtesy Jon Daamen

Because of her residence on three continents, she recognizes forms and landscapes from all over, in all kinds of natural materials, even in stamen and cauliflowers. Only the surroundings are different. In South Africa everything is easy on the eye and arranged in planes and groups. Is that why the experimental collages that Jon Daamen currently makes are much fuller than what she previously did? She thinks this is indeed the case. “The images I make now are abstracter, wilder and fuller. Maybe because I do in fact miss the fullness, the messiness, the colorfulness of  Paramaribo.”

Baardskeerdersbos  Art Route

Baardskeerdersbos Art Route

Baardskeerdersbos  Art Route

Baardskeerdersbos Art Route

Baardskeerdersbos  Art Route

Baardskeerdersbos Art Route

Baardskeerdersbos  Art Route

Baardskeerdersbos Art Route

On April 18 & 19, 2015, the collages of Jon Daamen were part of an exhibition in the Baardskeerdersbos  Art Route, an attractive and much visited initiative from the artist village of the same name, where the painters, photographers, sculptors, ceramists and guest artists open their homes for the public three times a year. Incorporated in the work that Jon Daamen has shown there, are seeds obtained from the pods that she picked up under the Spathodea at the Van ’t Hogerhuysstraat in Paramaribo.

* Spathodea campanulata, better known as African Tulip

Jon Daamen / Courtesy Jon Daamen

Jon Daamen / Courtesy Jon Daamen

Jon Daamen / Courtesy Jon Daamen

Jon Daamen / Courtesy Jon Daamen

TEXT Chandra van Binnendijk

Chandra van Binnendijk (Paramaribo, 1953) is editor and publicist. From 1977 until 1988 she was part of the news editors of various newspapers and radio stations, and was a correspondent for various Caribbean media. After ten years she said goodbye to active journalism and is since focusing mostly on culture, art and history. She has co-written several art publications amongst which Twintig jaar beeldende kunst in Suriname 1975 – 1995 (Amsterdam, KIT Publishers,
1995) and she was author and compiler of the art catalogue Zichtbaar (Paramaribo, 2005) about the art collection of De Surinaamsche Bank. Recent publications in which she was involved as co-author and co-compiler are Bouwstenen voor een betere wereld. 250 jaar vrijmetselarij in Suriname (Paramaribo, 2011) and TOR. A People’s Business (Paramaribo, 2012).

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