Thursday night feature: Presentation Sibylle Szaggars Redford

May 5, 2016 at 4:47 pm (Coming up, Inspired, Uncategorized) (, , , , , )

What: Thursday Night Feature: Presentation Sibylle Szaggars Redford

When: May 5, 2016, 19:00-21:00 hrs (presentation starts at 19:30 hrs)

Where: Readytex Art Gallery, Steenbakkerijstraat 30, Paramaribo, Suriname

Sibylle Szaggars Redford is a German born multimedia environmental artist from the US, who is currently in Suriname within the framework of the U.S. Department of State’s Art in Embassies program (also on Facebook). In Suriname she will, as she does elsewhere, visit several indigenous communities to gain inspiration for the artworks that she will create for the new building of the US embassy in Suriname, which opens later this year.

Also in Suriname are two other artists, Gregory Leon Baird & Karsten Staiger, both – as well as Szaggars Redford – in the project The Way of the Rain.

The work of Sibylle Szaggars Redford is fascinating. From her spiritual consciousness of our connection to life, the land, and the world, she creates art aimed at raising our awareness of environmentally unsound practices. She gets her inspiration from nature, ancient cultures such as the Hopi and the Pueblo tribes in the USA, from Morocco, or as in her most recent work the monsoon rains in the New Mexican High Desert. This is where she developed her ‘Rainfall’ series by placing her abstract watercolor compositions out in the rain, allowing it to interact with the work. This concept gradually developed into her Way of the Rain project, a multimedia performance that she has presented at, among other places, the National Young Arts Foundation in Miami and the Sundance Film Festival in Salt Lake City. These performances are a fascinating fusion of visual art with dance, music, light and spoken word.

During her presentation at the Thursday-night-feature at Readytex Art Gallery on May 5th, Sibylle Szaggars Redford will use photos and videos to introduce the public to her The Way of the Rain project and to her unique collaboration with the rain.

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Press release U.S. Embassy Paramaribo, May 3, 2016: U.S. Embassy Welcomes Art in Embassies Exchange Artist Sibylle Szaggars Redford

mv sib

Sibylle Szaggars Redford

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JAN First Thursday

Readytex Art Gallery

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SAX/Sranan Art Xposed nr. 11

January 30, 2016 at 8:08 pm (Headlines, Interesting reads) (, , , , , , )

January 2016 brings a well-filled edition of Sranan Art Xposed. If you haven’t received a mail yet, please send us a mail at srananart@gmail.com and mention whether you want the Dutch and/or the English edition. It is free of charge.

cover sax 11

Cover SAX 11

Download SAX nr. 11 here:

SAX 11 Nederlandse editie jan16

SAX 11 English edition jan16

Sranan Art Xposed keeps working towards a steadily growing digital platform. The great thing about this method of communicating and publishing is that it allows you the opportunity to react. By liking something, or sharing something, or by placing your comments. Go ahead and do this to your heart’s content!

WEBLOG https://srananart.wordpress.com/

FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/pages/SAXSranan-Art-Xposed/121474048032615

PHOTOS www.flickr.com/photos/srananart/

VIDEOS http://vimeo.com/user6622619

INSTAGRAM http://instagram.com/srananart

TWITTER http://twitter.com/srananart

GOOGLE +  

REACTIONS srananart@gmail.com (also for signing up to our mailing list ‘Leuke Dingen’-mailings and SAX Dutch and/or SAX English)

 

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First Thursday night feature of 2016: ‘Nude beginnings’

January 7, 2016 at 3:32 pm (Coming up) (, , , , , )

What: First Thursday night feature of 2016: ‘Nude beginnings’ (Facebook)


When: January 7, 2015, 18:00-21:00 hrs


Where: Readytex Art Gallery, Steenbakkerijstraat 30, Paramaribo, Suriname


The theme on this night will be centered around nudes. Not from one single artist, but from four different artists who are all, some more than others, known to paint nudes from time to time. Each of course in his own way, in his own style. On the second floor you will find paintings of whole and half naked figures by Reinier Asmoredjo, Kenneth Flijders and Rinaldo Klas and on the third floor the nudes of Wilgo Vijfhoven.

JAN First Thursday

Readytex Art Gallery

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An Eye for Art: Hanka Wolterstorff, ‘Vaas’ [Vase]

November 13, 2015 at 10:50 am (An Eye for Art) (, , , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed an informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week he talks about ‘Vaas’ [Vase], ceramics, 28 cm wide x 31 cm high x 18 cm deep, 2014, from Hanka WolterstorffThis will be our last edition for the time being. We hereby thank all regular An Eye for Art readers!

Hanka Wolterstorff, 'Vaas' [Vase],

Hanka Wolterstorff, ‘Vaas’ [Vase], ceramics, 28 cm wide x 31 cm high x 18 cm deep, 2014 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff (Hoorn, the Netherlands, 1943) simply calls this work ‘Vaas’ [Vase]. That seems logical, because it looks like a vase. Yet by doing so, she sells her work, as well as herself, short. She diminishes it by giving it the name of a utensil. I have nothing against utensils, they are necessary, but they are evaluated specifically based on their functionality. They are made for a specific purpose. That they can also be beautiful, different, original, or even visually stunning, is nice, but those are not the reasons why they end up on the shelves of stores such as the HEMA, Blokker of the Bijenkorf.

I am afraid that this vase would not make the HEMA. It is much to unpractical ánd to special for that. It contains strange edges that make it rather fragile. It would seem to me also, that the dishwasher wouldn’t do this vase any good either. Especially the colors would stand to suffer from it. At the same time, it is those exact disadvantages that are largely responsible for the quality of the work.

Wolterstorff often starts with flat slab of clay. She rolls out her clay until she has something like a piecrust. Then she starts cutting and folding. She searches for shapes that are not obvious. Because a vase conjures up a certain standard shape for most people, she deviates from that. She ‘sticks’ pieces together in such a way that they become a surprise. Moreover, and this is true for her other objects as well, she manages to add movement to a static object. She does this by applying color to the objects in a loose, almost careless manner. They run into one another as though they are still wet; sometimes they are transparent, other times they cover all traces; they seem to react to each other, but they are always disrupted by a color that doesn’t quite belong within the range. In this case light blue.

I would never put flowers in this vase. Not because it is not waterproof, I am quite sure that it is, but because it would be waste for this vase. Art simply just isn’t functional.

TEXT Rob Perrée, Amsterdam, November2015

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2015

Want to see this and other work of Hanka Wolterstorff ‘up close and personal’? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Steenbakkerijstraat 30, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Hanka Wolterstorff please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/hankawolterstorff.

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More work by Hanka Wolterstorff available in Readytex Art Gallery:

Hanka Wolterstorff, 'Untiltled I', ceramics, 2007 - USD 125 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, ‘Untiltled I’, ceramics, 2007 – USD 125 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, 'Speelbal van de natuur', ceramics, 40wx35hx30d cm, 2011 - USD 250 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, ‘Speelbal van de natuur’, ceramics, 40wx35hx30d cm, 2011 – USD 250 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, 'De golfslag van Coronie', ceramics, 60wx38hx32d cm, 2011 - USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Hanka Wolterstorff, ‘De golfslag van Coronie’, ceramics, 60wx38hx32d cm, 2011 – USD 300 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

LOGO eye for art

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on November 13, 2015 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on November 12, 2015.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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An Eye for Art: Soeki Irodikromo, ‘Coming together’

October 28, 2015 at 11:30 am (An Eye for Art) (, , , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed an informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week he talks about ‘Coming together’, acrylics on canvas, 71 cm wide x 93.5 cm high, 2013, from Soeki Irodikromo.

Soeki Irodikromo, 'Coming together', acrylics on canvas, 71 cm wide x 93.5 cm high, 2013 - USD 1800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Soeki Irodikromo, ‘Coming together’, acrylics on canvas, 71 cm wide x 93.5 cm high, 2013 – USD 1800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

The titles of art works are often too literal. They state that which the viewer sees. They add nothing to the work or to the viewing experience and the creativity of the viewer. In my opinion a title should be suggestive, raise questions, trigger curiosity and be somewhat puzzling.

The title of this work from Soeki Irodikromo (Pieterszorg, Commewijne, 1945) – ‘Coming Together’ – might initially seem literal. Figures coming together. That much is clear. But the title can actually refer to more aspects of the painting. Various colors, shapes, styles and symbols also come together. It is an abundantly filled convergence. The title hides that excessiveness within.

That abundance makes it into an enigmatic work. What exactly is happening here? Who are the figures? Is it a greeting? A planned meeting? A symbolic encounter? A meeting between lovers? It remains unclear. That uncertainty is strengthened because the artist allows the figurative and the abstract to mingle with each other. Furthermore, he works with symbols and characters that represent a language that I can only babble, but can’t speak nor read.

Irodikromo once said that Suriname is a melting pot of cultures. Its inhabitants accept the differences and more importantly, they are willing to share the different aspects of those cultures with each other. Looked at from that perspective, ‘Coming Together’ is a logical painting, an illustration of the country where the artist was born. It is not at all necessary to try to disentangle the elaborately tangled knot that he presents us with. That knot is supposed to be a knot. That knot is Suriname.

I am still inclined however, to link especially the characters, the symbols and the styles, to those different cultures. Perhaps that is a natural human act: a riddle must be solved. I do not get much further than that. I can detect hints of the CoBrA-movement in his imagery (his education in Rotterdam is undoubtedly partially responsible for that), I see symbols that could refer to Javanese mythology, I see a type of expressionism that leans more towards the international than the national, but that is as far as I get. For me many of the riddles remain riddles.

TEXT Rob Perrée, New York, October 2015

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2015

Want to see this and other work of Soeki Irodikromo ‘up close and personal’? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Steenbakkerijstraat 30, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Soeki Irodikromo please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/soeki.

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More work by Soeki Irodikromo available in Readytex Art Gallery:

Soeki Irodikromo, 'Transformation', acrylics on canvas, 63x77cm, 2015 - USD 1500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Soeki Irodikromo, ‘Transformation’, acrylics on canvas, 63x77cm, 2015 – USD 1500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Soeki Irodikromo, 'Duality', acrylics on canvas, 105x148cm, 2005-2015 - USD 2800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Soeki Irodikromo, ‘Duality’, acrylics on canvas, 105x148cm, 2005-2015 – USD 2800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Soeki Irodikromo, 'Battle', acrylics on canvas, 75.5x75.5cm, 2012 - USD 1500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Soeki Irodikromo, ‘Battle’, acrylics on canvas, 75.5×75.5cm, 2012 – USD 1500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Soeki Irodikromo, 'Owrukuku', acrylics on canvas, 147x119cm, 2009 - USD 3000 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Soeki Irodikromo, ‘Owrukuku’, acrylics on canvas, 147x119cm, 2009 – USD 3000 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

LOGO eye for art

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on Ocober 28, 2015 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on October 28, 2015.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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Xavier Robles de Medina in Zimbabwe

October 26, 2015 at 9:53 am (Elsewhere, Meanwhile ...) (, , , , )

Xavier Robles de Medina is a Surinamese artist working in painting and sculpture. In 2012 Robles de Medina graduated from the Savannah College of Art and Design, in the USA, with BFA’s in Painting and Animation. Robles de Medina has exhibited internationally and is represented by Catinca Tabacaru Gallery (on Facebook) in New York. He is currently an artist in residence at WOW, Amsterdam, where he lives and works. During four weeks in July and August 2015 he was an artist in residence with Dzimbanhete Arts Interactions in Harare, Zimbabwe.

Xavier Robles de Medina, 'Nharira Cave', chromatic ink pen on paper, 28 x 19 cm, 2015 / PHOTO Courtesy Xavier Robles de Medina, 2015

Xavier Robles de Medina, ‘Nharira Cave’, chromatic ink pen on paper, 28 x 19 cm, 2015 / PHOTO Courtesy Xavier Robles de Medina, 2015

Xavier Robles de Medina, 'Nharira Cave', chromatic ink pen on paper, 28 x 19 cm, 2015 / PHOTO Courtesy Xavier Robles de Medina, 2015

Xavier Robles de Medina, ‘Nharira Cave’, chromatic ink pen on paper, 28 x 19 cm, 2015 / PHOTO Courtesy Xavier Robles de Medina, 2015

An article was published in The Herald on September 11, 2015, and also an article in the ISSUU Magazine Povo, Issue 7, September 2015.

ISSUU Magazine Povo, Issue 7, September 2015 - 1 -

ISSUU Magazine Povo, Issue 7, September 2015 – 1 –

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ISSUU Magazine Povo, Issue 7:

Xavier Robles de Medina is a Surinamese artist working in painting and sculpture. His sensibilities are deeply rooted in an observational drawing practice as well as an objective dissection of the painting as a three-dimensional object. He questions social and artistic categorizations, in search for a truth regarding his identity as it relates to the painting tradition. His distinctions during his BFA include First Place for Black and White Drawing, as well as the Canson Award at the 2010 Foundations Honours Show. His work has been published on the cover of Strathmore canvas pads, the cover of the Savannah College of Art and Design graduate catalog, and reviewed in both Sranan Art Xposed vol. 5 and the Savannah Morning News. In 2012 Robles de Medina graduated from the Savannah College of Art and Design, in the USA, with BFA’s in Painting and Animation. In 2014, Robles de Medina was a guest speaker at the Academie voor Hoger Kunst – en Cultuuronderwijs, in Paramaribo, Suriname. Robles de Medina has exhibited internationally and is represented by Catinca Tabacaru Gallery in NY. He is currently an artist in residence at WOW, Amsterdam, where he lives and works.

How you did you get  to go to Dzimbanhete and the artist residency
Catinca had been hinting at doing a residency in Zimbabwe for some time. When plans started to solidify with Dzimbanhete Arts Interactions I got even more excited that we were going to be hosted by one of the pillars of the Zimbabwe art community. For me it made a lot of sense because of my history and culture as a Surinamese person, and dealing with certain issues of politics and identity in my work. And coming from a culture that is strongly influenced and connected to the African continent, I just knew it was going to be hugely inspiring.

What were your expectations of Zimbabwe and first impressions on arriving in Zimbabwe
I tried not to develop any expectations, regardless of what I had heard and read beforehand. When I arrived in Harare I was supposed to be picked up, but I think there was some confusion regarding my arrival time and because it was the middle of the night the airport was empty except for some taxi’s and one guy working at an airport shop, and even though I must have seemed completely weird and foreign to him he lent me his personal cell phone without hesitation. So I really felt a strong friendliness and hospitality from the moment I landed, and that is my prime impression of the people I met; a boundless empathy for others, even for complete strangers.

Are there any similarities between Zimbabwe and Suriname?
There are so many similarities that I noticed both in the bigger picture and in how people seem to treat each other on a personal level. Zimbabwe is a much larger country, and the population is ethnically less diverse so I wasn’t expecting the similarities to be as pervasive. But both exist in a post-colonial climate and achieved independence around the same time; after independence both faced huge challenges and went through periods of extreme economic hardship accompanied by hyperinflation and corruption, and I believe these factors determined many of the social and cultural similarities.

I noticed there is a sincerity, warmth, and approachability that is also very reminiscent of Suriname. There are so many similarities in micro details in cuisine, music, aesthetics, spirituality – too many to name, which is probably very directly resulted from the African diaspora, and cultural exchanges between Africa and the Caribbean. 

Your work is a mixture of painting, sculpture, graphite pencil any preference medium, what determines the medium you use?
Sometimes I’ll think that the material I use is just practical, and that what makes the work is actually a particular way I transform the material. But then, I’ll try to paint with acrylic, or watercolour and realize that I really just don’t like using it, or somehow it doesn’t compliment my hand as well so it certainly isn’t arbitrary. Most of the time, I’ll have an idea for a subject and concept and immediately envision it in a particular material. In general I have a strong tendency to engage in a hyper-refining and super-smoothing; I think about surface a lot and achieving a luscious and rich texture to carry the form and subject to the degree where emotional and conceptual meaning is completely intertwined with the way I use the materials. Even when there is a subject and discernible form, I believe the work lives in this abstract realm where the material is just as much subject as the literal depiction.

What inspired the body of sculptures that include “A Freeze is Coming’?

When I lived in Bed-Stuy, a very Caribbean neighbourhood in Brooklyn, I noticed these advertisements for hair products everywhere. On a personal level this reminded me a lot of Surinamese contemporary culture; at the same time it also made me think of Abstract Expressionist painters, and then strangely also of Renaissance or Baroque painting, because of the dynamism. All of these allusions strongly encouraged me to explore these images further, so I started to dissect them by cutting them into grids and rearranging them to be completely abstract fields of organic form. The form in the collages read so strongly to me, that I knew the works needed to be translated into sculptures or friezes. The materials I used for those works are also largely from similarities I drew between elements in Pop culture and painting history. “A Freeze is Coming” is made from a naturally black urethane, the actual same material used for Batman merchandise objects, like the Bat mobile toy, an object that is synonymous to painting in that it is in a chronic state of transformation.

“Counter” looks like Samora Machel former Mozambican president and Cecil John Rhodes, British imperialist, an unlikely team. Can you tell us more about the two men in that painting and what inspired it?
The men who inspired “Counter” are Wilfred Hawker and Surendre Rambocus, who attempted a counter-coup against the military regime in Suriname in 1981. Both men were executed, and the history of this event, the injustice, the trauma lingers and remains unresolved. The source image I used for the painting was already so symbolic of the way these events have been remembered or more so forgotten, that translating it through paint in a particular hazy manner becomes an homage to these men, but also to an archetype, a history many countries with a dictatorship or communist past share.

What is your understanding of contemporary art?
I feel very fortunate that I have been able to study painting in the United States, where the professors and education I enjoyed were excellent. It also gave me a strong understanding of one of the most important foundations of the contemporary art world: art education at university level. In New York City I was able to work for several art manufacturing companies and learned about that side of the contemporary art world, the importance of paying attention to detail, the culture of outsourcing and superstar artists and mega galleries. Furthermore, I was able to form a partnership with Catinca Tabacaru Gallery, which has taught me a lot about the contemporary art world in relation to what I do and who I am. I feel grateful to know the contemporary art world in Suriname, and now in Zimbabwe as well, where art is not really commoditised or even valued to the degree it is in wealthier countries; only the absolute most extreme art die-hards stick around and in many ways that makes it interesting. I think my understanding of the contemporary art world mainly lives as a culmination of all these experiences and insights.

Do you have work that you say “This is mine” Not for sale, not even for exhibition? 

I don’t at all. I spend so much time with the work, conceptualizing, creating, and refining, that by the time the work is finished and hanging on the wall I feel it’s very much over. Not dead, but to me I’m done with it, and I’m probably more interested in the next work/idea. Right now sales make me very happy, to know that someone likes it enough to spend money on it and hang it in their house. I think that’s the best part of being young and relatively unknown: whenever I sell work I feel confident it’s coming from a very real emotional need to live with the work, right now I want to just revel in that and offer up everything I do.

What did you take away from your interactions at Dzimbanhete?
Just the memory of all the amazing people I was able to hang out with for a month, the conversations, the moments when everything clicked and we felt so strongly connected, as well as the moments of tension and friction where we had to talk things out and work through issues. Also I feel I got to know Catinca, Raphael, Justin, and Rachel, a lot better in certain scenarios we wouldn’t have shared anywhere else, and living with them for a month really strengthened our friendship.

One particular aspect I’ve been thinking about a lot is the music culture. Certain people I met at Dzimbanhete would spend the whole day with music, playing the mbira, walking around with it, and I want to adopt that attitude in my own practice more. This complete effortless sense, that it’s not second nature, but first nature, and casual. 

What are your thoughts on the art scene in Zimbabwe from what you were exposed to? Any advice to the artists you worked with?

The Zimbabwe art scene is really very strong, like I said before, I believe it’s a small group of highly committed artists and art supporters. I wish I could have spent more time in some of the artist’s personal studios; I should really be asking artists like Admire Kamudzengerere, Misheck Masamvu, and Chiko Chazunguza for advice! But the advice I would give students and younger artists is to study these amazing individuals who are fully committed to culture, community, and making work.

What else did you get up to while in Zimbabwe?
We went to Mbare and experienced Harare city life quite a bit. We also did some touristy things like Great Zimbabwe, and Snake World. We were very lucky that most of the galleries in Harare were having openings and events during the time we were there, so outside of the residency and the artists we met through that, I feel we were privileged in gaining an understanding of how things operate in the city and in  galleries there.

You represented your country at tennis, Why did you not pursue a career in tennis?
I’m too short.

You have done short stories are you still writing?
During my stay in Zimbabwe I did come up with a plot about a foreigner who travels to an exotic land and gets attacked by baboons while meditating in the forest, though this idea requires quite a bit of refining. I think my short stories and writing are an extension of my greater passion for metaphor, composition, and human narrative. In a sense my drawings and paintings are also like poems or short stories. There is a relationship to language in everything I do thus writing is never completely divorced from my process.

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Open House. Exhibition of landscape paintings by A. Murugesan

October 23, 2015 at 11:19 pm (Meanwhile ...) ()

What: Open House. Exhibition of landscape paintings by A. Murugesan

When: Opening evening: Thursday, October 22, 2015, 19:00 hrs / Friday & Saturday, October 23 & 24, 2015, 10:00-19:00 hrs

Where: Anton Dragtenweg 254, Paramaribo, Suriname

Invitation

Invitation

A. Murugesan, 'Evening Light Paramaribo North' / PHOTO Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan, ‘Evening Light Paramaribo North’ / PHOTO Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan, 'Galibi' / PHOTO Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan, ‘Galibi’ / PHOTO Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan, 'Kronenberg Plantation' / PHOTO Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan, ‘Kronenberg Plantation’ / PHOTO Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan, 'Sluice in Suriname' / PHOTO Courtesy A. Murugesan

A. Murugesan, ‘Sluice in Suriname’ / PHOTO Courtesy A. Murugesan

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An Eye for Art: Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘In Search of 1’

October 14, 2015 at 2:07 pm (An Eye for Art) (, , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed an informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week he talks about ‘In Search of 1’, acrylics on canvas, 80 cm wide x 60 cm high, 2000, from Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi.

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘In Search of 1’, acrylics on canvas, 60 cm wide x 80 cm high, 2000 - USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘In Search of 1’, acrylics on canvas, 60 cm wide x 80 cm high, 2000 – USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

A surprising work, this colorful painting.

Abstraction is not popular in contemporary Surinamese art, let alone geometric abstraction. And compared to Tjon Pian Gi’s other figurative work, this canvas seems an exception or a bold experiment. Yet it is still a logical extension of that other work.

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi is inspired by her surroundings, but specifically by Surinamese nature and Surinamese culture, both traditional and more contemporary. This is especially noticeable in the portraits that she has painted of Surinamese women. Surinamese women are traditionally the designers of the well-known pangi textiles. In the arts they usually appear when they are worn, as a pattern or as a decorative element within a larger whole of visual elements. Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi gives them a life of their own. She paints them on canvas, meaning that she paints her personal interpretation of them on canvas. Just like how she always subjects reality to her own will or her own imagination. The subdued colors particularly, are indicative of this.

Several years ago, the Surinamese born artist Remy Jungerman created a series of lithographs of existing pangi-designs. His fascination for them however, went in a different direction. Research taught him that the designs originated from the same period as the work of the members of the artist group De Stijl, in particular from Piet Mondriaan. He brought them into the present by printing them layer upon layer, creating the impression of depth, and thus strengthening the suggestion of mutual influence.

Tjon Pian Gi chooses the Surinamese culture as her theme because she is deeply moved by it and because she wants to prevent its manifestations from becoming completely lost. Although she may not truly want to imitate reality, the method she uses is still a form of documentation.

TEXT Rob Perrée, Amsterdam, New York, October 2015

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2015

Want to see this and other work of Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi ‘up close and personal’? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Steenbakkerijstraat 30, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/kitlingtjonpiangi.

Print

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi also published two books, still available at Readytex Art Gallery, Steenbakkerijstraat 30, Paramaribo.

De kracht van vrouwen/The Strength of Women

KL F

More work by Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi available in Readytex Art Gallery:

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘In Search of 2’, acrylics on canvas, 60 cm wide x 80 cm high, 2000 - USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘In Search of 2’, acrylics on canvas, 60 cm wide x 80 cm high, 2000 – USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘In Search of 3’, acrylics on canvas, 60 cm wide x 80 cm high, 2000 - USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘In Search of 3’, acrylics on canvas, 60 cm wide x 80 cm high, 2000 – USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Marronmeisje’ [Marroon girl], acrylics on canvas, 80 cm wide x 60 cm high, year unknown - USD 700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Marronmeisje’ [Marroon girl], acrylics on canvas, 80 cm wide x 60 cm high, year unknown – USD 700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Woman Artist 3’, conte on paper, 70 cm wide x 100 cm high, year unknown - USD 550 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Woman Artist 3’, conte on paper, 70 cm wide x 100 cm high, year unknown – USD 550 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Mercredi des Cendres 9 Witch 2’, acryl on wood, 30 cm wide x 30 cm high, year unknown - USD 275 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Mercredi des Cendres 9 Witch 2’, acryl on wood, 30 cm wide x 30 cm high, year unknown – USD 275 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Vermont Impressions II’, acryl on glass, 64 cm wide x 66 cm high, 2012 - USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Vermont Impressions II’, acryl on glass, 64 cm wide x 66 cm high, 2012 – USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Born on the wrong date 1’, from the series ‘Short Stories’, acryl on canvas, 80 cm wide x 60 cm high, 2012 - USD / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Kit-Ling Tjon Pian Gi, ‘Born on the wrong date 1’, from the series ‘Short Stories’, acryl on canvas, 80 cm wide x 60 cm high, 2012 – USD 650 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

LOGO eye for art

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on Ocober 14, 2015 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on October 14, 2015.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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An Eye for Art: Wilgo Vijfhoven – ‘The First …’

September 30, 2015 at 11:17 pm (An Eye for Art) (, , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed an informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week he talks about ‘The First …’, acrylics on canvas, 65 cm wide x 111 cm high, 2014, by Wilgo Vijfhoven.

Wilgo Vijfhoven, ‘The First ...’, acrylics on canvas, 65 cm wide x 111 cm high, 2014 - USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Wilgo Vijfhoven, ‘The First …’, acrylics on canvas, 65 cm wide x 111 cm high, 2014 – USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

There are several things that intrigue me about this work of art. I know that while Vijfhoven (Paramaribo, 1964) paints figuratively, he does not attempt to create a true image of reality. He wants to be free to bring his emotions into it. The predominance of red and the white ‘shadow’ he has laid over the face of his model, are proof thereof. Striking in this work however, are the wild lines that he has ‘leaked’ over his painting. Rather than just being a deviation from reality, this act seems more like a disturbance of reality. Especially the carelessness, the randomness and the messiness of the lines seem to attest to a lack of respect for the individual portrayed. Or are the lines actually there to decorate the whole? If that is so, then the opposite is true. Whatever the case, it is as though he invites the viewer to take some distance. Also literally, because the lines create a sense of depth.

Vijfhoven makes no secret of his love for women. They are almost always the subject of his paintings. The person in this painting however, remains a mystery. The gender is not clear. Man? Woman? Both are possible. Because of that, the color red can be interpreted in different ways. In his paintings of women the red adds a haze of eroticism to the whole. In this work the red strengthens the suggestion that the ‘model’ is a native Indian. A ‘redskin’ with a feathered headdress. An unexpected change of theme.

From that point of view, the puzzling title – ‘The First …’ – suddenly becomes clearer. Wilgo Vijfhoven has afforded himself a little side trip within his own oeuvre. He left the women for what they are, and has diverted to another theme, a theme that is no less relevant in a multi cultural community such as that of Suriname.

The works that he is creating this year have yet to prove whether I am right …

TEXT Rob Perrée, Amsterdam, September 2015

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2015

Want to see this and other work of Wilgo Vijfhoven ‘up close and personal’? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Steenbakkerijstraat 30, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about Wilgo Vijfhoven please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/wilgovijfhoven.

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More work by Wilgo Vijfhoven available in Readytex Art Gallery:

Wilgo Vijfhoven, 'Moeder en kind' [Mother and child], acrylic on canvas 139x151cm, 2015 - USD 1200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Wilgo Vijfhoven, ‘Moeder en kind’ [Mother and child], acrylic on canvas 139x151cm, 2015 – USD 1200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Wilgo Vijfhoven, ‘Bamboe’ [Bamboo], acryl on canvas, 75 cm wide x 139 cm high, 2012, from the exhibition 'Rood' [Red] – USD 700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Wilgo Vijfhoven, ‘Bamboe’ [Bamboo], acryl on canvas, 75 cm wide x 139 cm high, 2012, from the exhibition ‘Rood’ [Red] – USD 700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Wilgo Vijfhoven, ‘Pauw’ [Peacock], acryl on canvas, 48.2 cm wide x 139.5 cm high, 2012, from the exhibition 'Rood' [Red] – USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Wilgo Vijfhoven, ‘Pauw’ [Peacock], acryl on canvas, 48.2 cm wide x 139.5 cm high, 2012, from the exhibition ‘Rood’ [Red] – USD 600 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Wilgo Vijfhoven, ‘Bamboe II’, acryl on canvas, 20 cm wide x 90 cm high, 2012, from the exhibition 'Rood' [Red] – USD 250 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Wilgo Vijfhoven, ‘Bamboe II’, acryl on canvas, 20 cm wide x 90 cm high, 2012, from the exhibition ‘Rood’ [Red] – USD 250 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Wilgo Vijfhoven, ‘Sfeer III’, mixed media on canvas, 71 cm wide x 101 cm high, 2009 - USD 650 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Wilgo Vijfhoven, ‘Sfeer III’, mixed media on canvas, 71 cm wide x 101 cm high, 2009 – USD 650 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on September 30, 2015 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on September 30, 2015.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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An Eye for Art: René Tosari – ‘Untitled 1’

September 16, 2015 at 12:00 pm (An Eye for Art) (, , , , )

In collaboration with art critic Rob PerréeReadytex Art Gallery has developed an informative initiative: An Eye for Art. Once every two weeks Rob Perrée discusses a work of art from the collection of Readytex Art Gallery. This week he talks about ‘Untitled 1’, mixed media on canvas, 150 cm wide x 100 cm high, 2014, by René Tosari.

René Tosari, 'Untilted 1', mixed media on canvas, 90x70.5cm, 2012 - USD 1100 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, ‘Untilted 1’, mixed media on canvas, 90×70.5cm, 2012 – USD 1100 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

Sometimes I wonder how hard it must be for an older artist to keep making exciting work. Exciting for himself, but also exciting for viewers, especially those who have been following him for years. René Tosari (Meerzorg, 1948) is one such an artist who has been going at it for about four decades. Because he has always been socially involved and because he has worked in tumultuous as well as peaceful times, alternately in Suriname and in the Netherlands, I never got the feeling that he was repeating himself. At best, his work was familiar to me, just like how you grow with your friends, even when those friends go off in a different direction.

This untitled work from 2012 has truly surprised me however. Not because of the way it has been painted. That is familiar. Ever since Tosari knew that he would return to Suriname and ever since he’s back, his paintings are more narrative, no longer filled with symbols and laden signs, more sober, closer to reality. They are like a type of visual diary looking back on memories, but at the same time also portraying current events. The content still contains the serious note it always had.

What I do find surprising is that this painting is almost hilarious. A couple that is experiencing an exceedingly happy moment. Infatuation? Burgeoning lust? Simple fun? The joyful sparks just jump off of it. The flowers that fly across the canvas from all sides symbolize those sparks. The couple is also shown as if in motion. Arms and legs seem to go off in all directions. I get a sense of catching them in a cheerful, but also intimate moment. That intimacy gets an extra charge because I can’t get past the feeling that the artist is probably one of the lovers himself. At least those glasses look very familiar to me.

To the outsider however, that little tidbit is of no consequence whatsoever. He sees a couple that is having an infectiously fun time. An unusual emotion in the ‘cathedral of art’. Unjustly so. This work quite adequately proves that.

TEXT Rob Perrée, Amsterdam, September 11, 2015

TRANSLATION Cassandra Gummels-Relyveld, 2015

Want to see this and other work of René Tosari ‘up close and personal’? That’s possible at Readytex Art Gallery, Steenbakkerijstraat 30, Paramaribo. www.readytexartgallery.comFor more information about René Tosari please visit the website http://readytexartgallery.com/renetosari.

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More on the Sranan Art blog about René Tosari please look here.

More work by René Tosari available in Readytex Art Gallery:

René Tosari, 'Untitled', mixed media on canvas, 91x70cm, 2015 - USD 950 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, ‘Untitled’, mixed media on canvas, 91x70cm, 2015 – USD 950 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, 'Untitled 2', 70x65cm, 2011 - USD 1000 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, ‘Untiled 2’, 70x65cm, 2011 – USD 1000 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, 'Untitled', mixed media on canvas, 101.5x99cm, 2015 - USD 1200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, ‘Untitled’, mixed media on canvas, 101.5x99cm, 2015 – USD 1200 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, Carifesta '13', mixed media on canvas, 140x100cm, 2015 - USD 1500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, CArifesta ’13’, mixed media on canvas, 140x100cm, 2015 – USD 1500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, 'Intoduction by Rayman', mixed media on canvas, 150x100cm, 2012 - USD 1750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, ‘Intoduction by Rayman’, mixed media on canvas, 150x100cm, 2012 – USD 1750 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, ‘The world in motion’, mixed media on canvas, 150 cm wide x 110 cm high, 2014 - USD 1800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, ‘The world in motion’, mixed media on canvas, 150 cm wide x 110 cm high, 2012 – USD 1800 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, ‘Coronie libi de III’ [Coronie there is life III], mixed media on canvas, 92 cm wide x 149 cm high, 2010 - USD 1700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, ‘Coronie libi de III’ [Coronie there is life III], mixed media on canvas, 92 cm wide x 149 cm high, 2010 – USD 1700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, ‘Coronie libi de I’ [Coronie there is life I], mixed media on canvas, 100 cm wide x 140 cm high, 2010 - USD 1700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, ‘Coronie libi de I’ [Coronie there is life I], mixed media on canvas, 100 cm wide x 140 cm high, 2010 – USD 1700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, ‘Untitled I’, mixed media on canvas, 100 cm wide x 149 cm high, 2010 - USD 1700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, ‘Untitled I’, mixed media on canvas, 100 cm wide x 149 cm high, 2010 – USD 1700 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, ‘Dichtbij de oorsprong 18’ [Close to the source 18], mixed media on canvas, 160 cm wide x 250 cm high, 2010 - USD 3000 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, ‘Dichtbij de oorsprong 18’ [Close to the source 18], mixed media on canvas, 160 cm wide x 250 cm high, 2009 – USD 3000 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, ‘Diversity is power 1’, mixed media on canvas, 95 cm wide x 110 cm high, 2009 - USD 1500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

René Tosari, ‘Diversity is power 1’, mixed media on canvas, 95 cm wide x 110 cm high, 2009 – USD 1500 / PHOTO Readytex Art Gallery/William Tsang

A work by René Tosari from the 'Digi' series was used for an art wrap, as sold by the Readytex Art Gallery

A work by René Tosari from the ‘Digi’ series was used for an art wrap, as sold by the Readytex Art Gallery

A work by René Tosari from the 'Digi' series was used for an art wrap, as sold by the Readytex Art Gallery

A work by René Tosari from the ‘Digi’ series was used for an art wrap, as sold by the Readytex Art Gallery

LOGO eye for art

This edition of An Eye for Art has been sent as a RAG-mailing on September 16, 2015 and was published in Kunst en Cultuur in de Ware Tijd on September 16, 2015.

Because really looking at art and understanding art are not always obvious and easy to do, we hope that these regular reviews will at least offer you some insight into the process.  You will get to see how a connoisseur looks at art, discusses it, and then links the work to others within the international art world.

Of course you can only truly judge a work of art when you are actually standing in front of it yourself. We therefore hope to see you soon in Readytex Art Gallery  and are eager to hear what you think of this artwork, and which other works of art you find yourself drawn to. Please note that the artworks discussed are still available for purchase at the time that the review is published.

Rob Perrée is art historian and works as freelance writer, art critic and curator, specialized in contemporary (Afro-) American art, African art, Surinamese art and art using new media. His work has appeared in countless catalogues, books, magazines and newspapers. He is editor of Sranan Art Xposed, editor in chief of Africanah.org and a member of the editing team of Pf Photo Magazine. His website: http://robperree.com.

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